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From the Publisher

Volume 2 of a two-volume set by one of the foremost Egyptologists contains 20 chapters including Amen, and Amen-Ra, and the Triad of Thebes; Hapi, the God of the Nile; The Triad of Elephantine; Osiris; Isis; miscellaneous gods of the winds, senses, planets, and more; and Sacred Animals and Birds. 49 plates, 93 illustrations. 
Published: Dover Publications on
ISBN: 9780486139982
List price: $18.99
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