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From the Publisher

Republished unabridged from the final comprehensive edition, this work contains the largest single-volume collection of classical art motifs ever compiled. It reproduces material from Greek and Roman, medieval European, Islamic, Renaissance, baroque, and early nineteenth-century art, architecture, and design — in all, presenting artists, crafters, and students with more than 3,000 designs.
Featured design elements include networks, Gothic tracery, geometric designs, akanthos leaves, lotus ornamentation, animal ornamentation, grotesque figures, fret bands, chains, interlacements, rosettes, undulations, spirals, link borders, cresting borders, finials, crockets, gargoyles, foliations, panels, repeated ornaments, and hundreds of other elements. Other plates show decorated pottery vases, religious utensils, weapons, furniture, lamps, jewelry, and other artifacts, in addition to heraldic motifs and ornamental letters.

Published: Dover Publications on
ISBN: 9780486155265
List price: $17.95
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