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From the Publisher

"Does your brain need a workout? Are you wondering what to do? Well this could be the book for you! This is a great book for anyone who is looking for a challenge and, if you get too stuck, the author kindly also provided the answers at the end of each chapter!" — Splashes Into Books
Give your mind a playful workout with this collection of more than 100 inventive puzzles. Finding the solutions requires only minimal mathematical knowledge and will test your imagination as well as your brainpower. The motley collection ranges from conundrums and mathematical stunts to practical situations involving counting and measuring. Chess problems, magic squares, and a host of other intriguing scenarios will amuse and challenge puzzle enthusiasts and fans of recreational mathematics. Answers appear at the end of each chapter.
These puzzles are the inventions of a gifted Soviet mathematician, Yakov Perelman, whose popular science books on astronomy, physics, and mathematics inspired generations of readers. Perelman's distinctive style, abounding in wit and ingenuity, adds a special flair to his timeless riddles and brainteasers.

Published: Dover Publications on
ISBN: 9780486803456
List price: $8.95
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