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The Tale of Squirrel Nutkin

The Tale of Squirrel Nutkin

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The Tale of Squirrel Nutkin

ratings:
3/5 (159 ratings)
Length:
35 pages
9 minutes
Publisher:
Released:
Aug 7, 2015
ISBN:
9789635277988
Format:
Book

Description

“A STORY FOR NORAH”


This is a Tale about a tail—a tail that belonged to a lit-tle red squirrel, and his name was Nutkin.
He had a brother called Twinkleberry, and a great many cousins: they lived in a wood at the edge of a lake.

In the middle of the lake there is an island covered with trees and nut bushes; and amongst those trees stands a hollow oak-tree, which is the house of an owl who is called Old Brown.

One autumn when the nuts were ripe, and the leaves on the hazel bushes were golden and green—Nutkin and Twinkleberry and all the other little squirrels came out of the wood, and down to the edge of the lake.

They made little rafts out of twigs, and they paddled away over the water to Owl Island to gather nuts.
Each squirrel had a little sack and a large oar, and spread out his tail for a sail.

They also took with them an offering of three fat mice as a present for Old Brown, and put them down upon his door-step.
Then Twinkleberry and the other little squirrels each made a low bow, and said politely—
"Old Mr. Brown, will you favour us with permission to gather nuts upon your island?"

But Nutkin was excessively impertinent in his man-ners. He bobbed up and down like a little red cherry, singing—
"Riddle me, riddle me, rot-tot-tote!
A little wee man, in a red red coat!
A staff in his hand, and a stone in his throat;
If you'll tell me this riddle, I'll give you a groat."


Now this riddle is as old as the hills; Mr. Brown paid no attention whatever to Nutkin.
He shut his eyes obstinately and went to sleep.

Publisher:
Released:
Aug 7, 2015
ISBN:
9789635277988
Format:
Book

About the author

YAZAR:MURAT UKRAYYetkinlikler:Aynı zamanda bir yazar olan ve yaklaşık genel araştırma konuları ile fizikle ve birleşik alan kramı ile ilgili 2006’dan beri kaleme aldığı yaklaşık 12 eseri bulunan Murat UKRAY, yine bunları kendi kurmuş olduğu çeşitli web siteleri üzerinden, kitaplarını sadece dijital elektronik ortamda, hem düzenli olarak yılda yazmış veya yayınlamış olduğu diğer eserleri de yayın hayatına e-KİTAP ve POD (Print on Demand -talebe göre yayıncılık-) sistemine göre yayın hayatına geçirerek okurlarına sunmayı ilke olarak edinirken; diğer yandan da, projenin SOSYAL yönü olan doğayı korumak amaçlı başlattığı "e-KİTAP PROJESİ" isimli yayıncılık sistemiyle KİTABINI KLASİK SİSTEMLE YAYINLAYAMAYAN "AMATÖR YAZARLAR" için, elektronik ortamda kitap yayıncılığı ile kitaplarını bu sistemle yayınlatmak isteyen PROFESYONEL yayıncılar ve yazarlar için de hemen hemen her çeşit kitabın (MAKALE, AKADEMİK DERS KİTABI, ŞİİR, ROMAN, HİKAYE, DENEME, GÜNLÜK TASLAK) elektronik ortamda yayıncılığının önünü açan e-YAYINCILIĞA 2010 yılı başlarından beri başlamıştır ve halen daha ilgili projeleri yürütmektedir..Aynı zamanda YAZAR KOÇLUĞU ve KUANTUM & BİRLEŞİK ANA KURAMI doğrultusunda, kişisel gelişim uzmanlığı konularında da faaliyet göstermektedir..Çalışma alanları:Köşe yazarlığı yapmak, Profesyonel yazarlık (12 yıldır), Blog yazarlığı, web sitesi kurulumu, PHP Programlama, elektronik ticaret sistemleri, Sanal kütüphane uygulamaları, e-Kitap Uygulamaları ve Yazılımları, Kişisel gelişim, Kuantum mekaniği ve Birleşik Alan teorisi ile ilgili Kuramsal ve Uygulama çalışmaları..


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What people think about The Tale of Squirrel Nutkin

3.0
159 ratings / 8 Reviews
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Reader reviews

  • (4/5)
    When the squirrels go to gather nuts from owl’s island, they are all polite and industrious, except for squirrel nutkin who torments the owl with riddles and then plays games. In the end, the owl catches him, but Nutkin gets away- minus half his tail!
  • (4/5)
    Nutkin is an obnoxious little squirrel who likes to cause trouble. He kept pestering the owl when they went to collect nuts on his property, and he wasn't particularly respectful to him. The owl ignored Nutkin for the first few times and waited for his behavior to change. As Nutkin's behavior worsened, the owl decided to take action against the annoying little squirrel, and Nutkin ended up losing half of his tail. This teaches readers that there are consequences for being annoying and rude to others. Recommended for ages 5 and up.
  • (3/5)
    This story's a good example of what can happen when you're obnoxious! Loved the illustrations in this Beatrix Potter tale.
  • (3/5)
    Lovely illustrations, but a stale, repetitive story. It's an interesting look at how social customs have changed; by today's standards, I'd say Nutkin is obnoxious, not necessarily rude, and certainly not deserving of the mutilation he received.
  • (4/5)
    This book is about a squirrel named Nutkin, who is very "impertinent" or in other words very disrespectful in particularly to a generous owl who lets all the squirrels from across the lake gather nuts from his island. Nutkin bounces about in front of the owl saying riddles while the other squirrels leave gifts for the owl in regards to his generosity. Day after day this continues until the owl decides to show Nutkin what he is capable of doing to rodents. Nutkin escapes from the owl but learned his lesson. I liked this book because it had an interesting theme. The book seems simply fun at first with no true meaning. However, as I continued to read I started to understand that the author was trying to cause the reader to reflect on the values of generosity and respect. For example, the squirrels that were kind and giving were not injured like Nutkin in the end.I also liked the imaginative qualities of this book. Besides the fact that the animals could talk, they could also row across a lake and use there tails as personal sails.
  • (3/5)
    Beatrix Potter is best known for her book The Tale of Peter Rabbit published in 1902 but that book was only the first in a collection of 23 tales featuring the animals and landscape of Potter's beloved Lake District. The Tale of Squirrel Nutkin is the second book in the popular series. Unlike Peter Rabbit's story Squirrel Nutkin's tale has little that will appeal to children in modern times. The illustrations, on the other hand, will still delight. All of Potter's tales are illustrated with her characteristic water color paintings that show little animals, ducks, rabbits, frogs, hedgehogs, squirrels, kittens, etc. going about their busy lives in the countryside. Often the main character is a mischievous youngster who gets into trouble but learns a valuable lesson. I love Potter's paintings because of their realistic details charmingly coupled with fantasy notions of animals with fanciful human attributes and occupations. The Tale of Squirrel Nutkin does not disappoint in this area. I think many adult art lovers will enjoy leafing through this book and will certainly appreciate the captivating little creatures and scenery. I love the gentle Victorian influences in the art and in the story. The story of the young red squirrel named Nutkin takes place during a fine Lake District autumn. Nutkin, his brother Twinkleberry and several of their cousins live on the shore of a lake. In the middle of the lake is an island covered with nut trees and bushes where lives the lord and master of the island, a large and powerful owl named Old Brown. The squirrels build rafts and sail over to the island each day for six days, (the seventh day being the Sabbath there is no action.) Each day they bring sacks and a different present to appease Old Brown so that he will grant them permission to collect nuts on his island. Each day nine or so polite little squirrels deliver their present and humbly seek permission, however there is one little squirrel who is consistently "excessively impertinent in his manners." You guessed it...Nutkin! He frolics around and teases Old Brown and every day he recites a different nonsense nursery verse or a silly riddle. He sings rudely, tickles Old Brown, skips, bobs up and down, laughs and even jumps on top of Old Brown! Mostly the owl just ignores him. Nutkin fools around while the other squirrels are working and plays marbles with oak-apples (acorns), sticks pine needles into robin's pincushions from a briar bush, and has a game of ninepins with a crab apple and some green fir cones. Eventually, in this tale of a tail, Nutkin pushes Old Brown too far. One frightful illustration shows the big owl with his talons around the throat of the helpless Nutkin. I'm sure you can guess what happens. I love the charming story, especially its quaint Victorian sentiments. One of the things I like best about it, however, is the very reason I do not think modern children will enjoy it. It contains several old riddles, one or two for each visit to the island, the answers to which can be found hidden in the text. For example here is an old Scottish riddle that Nutkin chirps at Old Brown on day six: Arthur O'Bower has broken his band, He comes roaring up the land! The King of Scots with all his power, Cannot turn Arthur of the Bower! Answer to the riddle: the wind. or how 'bout this one from day four: Hum-a-bum! buzz! buzz! Hum-a-bum buzz! As I went over Tipple-tine I met a flock of bonny swine; Some yellow-nacked, some yellow backed! They were the very bonniest swine That e'er went over Tipple-tine. Answer: bees The riddles are antiquated and even with the hint in the text young children who are the likely audience for this story will probably find them confusing or dull. Also confusing are the "presents" that the squirrels deliver to Old Brown. On the first day they give the owl three dead mice and on the second day, a fat dead mole. They give minnows and beetles. They wrap the beetles up in dock leaves secured with pine needle pins so they will look like plum puddings. The squirrels have human characteristics in that they speak and sing and make rafts and carry little canvas sacks...and well, they understand strange little riddles and know how to gift wrap. Talented rodents, these...but are they murderers, too? Explain to your child why squirrels kill other rodents like mice and moles in order to provide the payola for the Godfather owl crime boss. Well, you see, Johnny, squirrels are people and mice and moles are food so that's okay if they're dead. Um, owls are people, too, but they kill the squirrels if they don't get presents. Well, no, they're not human but they're people. No, our dog is not a person and he cannot sit at the table for supper. It's make-believe, Johnny. Sit quietly and I'll finish the story. Yes, the dead mice look real in the pictures and so do the squirrels...but the squirrels are pretend pretend and the mice are pretend real. The story is repetitious and not particularly long on action. Every day, paddle over to the island, give the owl a present, collect hazel nuts. Every day Nutkin acts like a nutter, gets in Old Brown's face, sings a riddle or nursery rhyme and goofs off while Twinkleberry and the cousins work. Finally violence erupts and the jolly (but perish the thought, rude) Nutkin is maimed as an ever present reminder of his impertinence. There is not much here to engage a modern child, especially not for one young enough to be content with such a short, picture driven story book. There are several difficult words for young children such as obstinately, gracious, nettle, scarlet, counterpane, Hackamore, waistcoat, groat, herring. These are not difficult for a well read child with access to a dictionary but again, it is likely not the well read child who will be enjoying these nursery books at mother or father's knee. My feelings on The Tale of Squirrel Nutkin and Beatrix Potter books in general are mixed. I love the art. I love the quaint Victorian text complete with a moral. I even love the old riddles. If these books were intended and marketed for crazy bookish old ladies with a nostalgic love for things Victorian, then...hip hip hooray! 5 stars! However, this book and the others of this series are to this day one of the most popular new baby gifts and have been a part of most every nursery library since they were written a century ago. Why then have I easily collected the entire set in several different sizes and formats from rummage sales (boot or jumble sales for my British friends)? Why? Because no one reads them and no children beg Mommy or Daddy for "just one more" before the lights are turned out. These are more or less purchased as classics (which they are) but they no longer seem to pass the kid test. I hope they never go out of print because they are works of art of a bygone day. However, since they have become somewhat obsolete they only get 3 stars from me when judged as a modern children's book.
  • (4/5)
    Avl, sans illus., on gutenberg.org. And if you know Potter's art, you can imagine the pix quite well for yourself. Good riddles; my favorite kind. Good lesson for the naughty little squirrel, too. I'm not a huge fan of Peter Rabbit, but I do like some of the other stories by Potter.
  • (5/5)
    This is a story of a naughty little squirrel name Squirrel Nutkin, who loves to tease Mr. Brown, an owl who lives on an island filled with nut trees, which fancy the other squirrels. Daily the squirrels came bringing gifts to Mr. Brown as to gain permission to harvest these nuts in return. While they are being polite, Squirrel Nutkin is prety much very naughty. He teases him with riddles, mostly ignore by the owl but when too much is too much one day, Mr. Brown punished Nutkins by having his tail torn off! This is a cute and enjoyable little story. It also teaches kids to not to tease people too much that they are out of line. The illustrations are beautiful. The riddles are cute. The plot and charcaters draws you in. Children would love to read or to be read to with this funny little "tail". Don't miss out inadding this book to your children's reading list.