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Tucson

Tucson

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Tucson

Length:
150 pages
39 minutes
Released:
Aug 24, 2015
ISBN:
9781439652916
Format:
Book

Description

After World War II, Tucson experienced burgeoning growth. People were drawn here by the mild winters. By 1950, Tucson's population reached 120,000, and it doubled to 220,000 by 1960. In 1952, the world-famous Arizona-Sonora Desert Museum was founded. Four years later, the Tucson Air National Guard Base was activated. During the 1960s, the Old Tucson Studios theme park, El Con Mall, the Tucson International Airport, the University of Arizona College of Medicine, Reid Park Zoo, and Pima Community College were established. In the 1970s, the Tucson Community Center and the Pima Air & Space Museum were established. Around 1984, Channel 12 began broadcasting. In the 1990s, Biosphere II was built, and in 2005, the Jewish History Museum and the Southern Arizona Transportation Museum were dedicated. Tucson has stood the test of time, surviving the difficult periods and thriving during the good times.
Released:
Aug 24, 2015
ISBN:
9781439652916
Format:
Book

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Tucson - Jane Eppinga

collection.

INTRODUCTION

Tucson grew from a collection of mud huts to a thriving metropolis. Today, E. Ross Browne would not say that Tucson was a place of resort for traders, speculators, gamblers, horse-thieves, murderers and vagrant politicians. From 1867 to 1877, Tucson served as the capital of the Arizona Territory. Tucson incorporated in 1877, making it the oldest incorporated city in Arizona. Located in the Sonoran Desert, it is surrounded by mountains. The city is blessed with 360 sunny days a year, and it must be admitted that it gets a tad warmish in the summer. Local industries include electronics and missile production. Tucson is the seat of Pima County, and its metropolitan area supports more than one million residents. So, hop onto the brand-new streetcars or take a walk down Tucson’s Turquoise Trail and learn about this fascinating city.

The five flags that have flown over Tucson include those of the state of Arizona, the Confederate States of America, the United States, Mexico, and Spain. On the walled presidio of San Agustín de Tucson flew the flag of Spain. When Mexico secured independence from Spain in 1821, Tucson flew the flag of Mexico. In 1853, Tucson became part of the Arizona Territory and the United States through the Gadsden Purchase, and a flag with 29 stars was raised over Tucson. In February 1862, Tucson was occupied by Confederate forces flying the Confederate flag until May 20, when it was recaptured by Union forces. On February 14, 1912, Tucson became part of the new state of Arizona.

One

TUCSON WALKS THE

TURQUOISE TRAIL

Downtown Tucson’s historical sites may be visited by walking its 2.5-mile Turquoise Trail, also known as the Presidio Trail. The Turquoise Trail, modeled after Boston’s famous Freedom Trail, guides residents and visitors to 23 of the city’s historical landmarks. The sites, marked with descriptive plaques, form a loop around downtown Tucson, from the Presidio Wall south to Carrillo Elementary School, northeast to the Hotel Congress and northwest to finish at the Telles Block, which is now Old Town Artisans. The sites are connected by a turquoise-colored line that is being painted on the sidewalk for most of the length of the trail. Two women responsible for this project are Gayle Hartmann and Marjorie Cunningham. A brochure marking the trail’s path and explaining its sites and their significance is available at the Metropolitan Tucson Convention and Visitors Bureau and at hotels and restaurants. The following images are a small sampling of what one will see walking the Turquoise Trail.

Fr. Eusebio Francisco Kino founded 21 missions in what is now northern Sonora, Mexico, and southern Arizona in the late 1600s and early 1700s. The missions in Arizona include San Xavier, Tumacácori, and Guevavi. His equestrian statues are located at Fifteenth Street and Kino Parkway in Tucson, Magdalena, Sonora, where he is buried, and his native Segno, Italy. Kino was 65 when he died in Magdalena, and his bones are on display in the courtyard of the church.

Saguaro National Park is home to the giant saguaro cactus, but it also hosts a variety of desert plants as well as quail, owls, and javelinas. Saguaro National Monument was created by outgoing president Herbert Hoover in 1933. On October 14, 1994, Pres. William Jefferson Clinton signed legislation enlarging Saguaro’s boundaries and making Saguaro National Park America’s 52nd national park. (Courtesy of Saguaro National Park.)

Pictured here are Saguaro National Park petroglyphs. Southwestern rock art, which predates written history, originated hundreds or perhaps thousands of years ago with the Hohokam people, who lived in the area that is now Tucson. These mysterious images from the past may have religious or ceremonial significance. They also may be solstice markers, clan symbols, or decorative motifs. (Both, courtesy of Saguaro National Park.)

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