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From the Publisher

Food Security, Poverty and Nutrition Analysis provides essential insights into the evaluative techniques necessary for creating appropriate and effective policies and programs to address these worldwide issues. Food scientists and nutritionists will use this important information, presented in a conceptual framework and through case studies for exploring representative problems, identifying and implementing appropriate methods of measurement and analysis, understanding examples of policy applications, and gaining valuable insight into the multidisciplinary requirements of successful implementation.

This book provides core information in a format that provides not only the concept behind the method, but real-world applications giving the reader valuable, practical knowledge.

* Identify proper analysis method, apply to available data, develop appropriate policy
* Demonstrates analytical techniques using real-world scenario application to illustrate approaches for accurate evaluation improving understanding of practical application development
* Tests reader comprehension of the statistical and analytical understanding vital to the creation of solutions for food insecurity, malnutrition and poverty-related nutrition issues using hands-on exercises
Published: Academic Press an imprint of Elsevier Books Reference on
ISBN: 9780080878867
List price: $122.95
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