• book
    0% of 3D Fibre Reinforced Polymer Composites completed

From the Publisher

Fibre reinforced polymer (FRP) composites are used in almost every type of advanced engineering structure, with their usage ranging from aircraft, helicopters and spacecraft through to boats, ships and offshore platforms and to automobiles, sports goods, chemical processing equipment and civil infrastructure such as bridges and buildlings. The usage of FRP composites continues to grow at an impessive rate as these materials are used more in their existing markets and become established in relatively new markets such as biomedical devices and civil structures. A key factor driving the increased applications of composites over the recent years is the development of new advanced forms of FRP materials. This includes developments in high performance resin systems and new styles of reinforcement, such as carbon nanotubes and nanoparticles. This book provides an up-to-date account of the fabrication, mechanical properties, delamination resistance, impact tolerance and applications of 3D FRP composites. The book focuses on 3D composites made using the textile technologies of weaving, braiding, knitting and stiching as well as by z-pinning.
Published: Elsevier Science an imprint of Elsevier Books Reference on
ISBN: 9780080525822
List price: $170.00
Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
Availability for 3D Fibre Reinforced Polymer Composites
With a 30 day free trial you can read online for free
  1. This book can be read on up to 6 mobile devices.

Related Articles

Popular Science
4 min read
Fashion & Beauty

This Stuff Melts Your Crappy Fast Fashion Into Fabric Stronger Than Cotton

Eugenia Smimova Master's student Eugenia Smimova used different waste textiles with similar color, shredded them, dissolved them in the ionic liquid and spun new fibers. A few years ago, the New York Public Library extricated a wardrobe survey printed in the 1941 edition of the magazine Design for Living from its archives. The survey, which peered into the armoires of collegiate women across the country, is a fascinating time capsule—and not just because pants are conspicuously absent. The women's sparse closets are shocking by current U.S. standards. Most owned as few as three and half blouse
Newsweek
3 min read
Fashion & Beauty

Camel Hair Was the Glamour Garment of the 1930s

If it’s often said that cockroaches will survive the coming nuclear apocalypse, a case could also be made for the survival potential of Camelus bactrianus. About 1.4 million of these twin-humped camels call northern Asia home; many can be found knocking about the Gobi Desert, a place of 90-mile-per-hour winds where the temperature swings from minus 40 to plus 50 C. The climate is so inhospitable that nuking might actually improve things. Yet in spite of all, the camels amble on—partly because their hair has marvelous thermal insulation properties. Camel hair also has history. Between the two
Futurity
3 min read

Fuzzy Fibers for Rocket Engines Can Take the Heat

To stand up to the heat and pressure of next-generation rocket engines, the composite fibers used to make them should be fuzzy, say researchers. Their “fuzzy fibers” of silicon carbide act like Velcro and stand up to the punishment that materials experience in aerospace applications. The fibers strengthen composites used in advanced rocket engines that have to withstand temperatures up to 1,600 degrees Celsius (2,912 degrees Fahrenheit). Ceramic composites in rockets now being developed use silicon carbide fibers to strengthen the material, but they can crack or become brittle when exposed to