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From the Publisher

Dr. R. Peter King covers the field of quantitative modeling of mineral processing equipment and the use of these models to simulate the actual behavior of ore dressing and coal washing as they are configured to work in industrial practice.

The material is presented in a pedagogical style that is particularly suitable for readers who wish to learn the wide variety of modeling methods that have evolved in this field. The models vary widely from one unit type to another. As a result each model is described in some detail.

Wherever possible model structure is related to the underlying physical processes that govern the behaviour of particulate material in the processing equipment.

Predictive models are emphasised throughout so that, when combined, they can be used to simulate the operation of complex mineral processing flowsheets. The development of successful simulation techniques is a major objective of the work that is covered in the text.

Covers all aspects of modeling and simulation Provides all necessary tools to put the theory into practice
Published: Elsevier Science an imprint of Elsevier Books Reference on
ISBN: 9780080511849
List price: $79.95
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