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From the Publisher

Aeronautical Engineer's Data Bookis an essential handy guide containing useful up to date information regularly needed by the student or practising engineer. Covering all aspects of aircraft, both fixed wing and rotary craft, this pocket book provides quick access to useful aeronautical engineering data and sources of information for further in-depth information. Quick reference to essential data Most up to date information available
Published: Elsevier Science an imprint of Elsevier Books Reference on
ISBN: 9780080488288
List price: $47.95
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