• book

From the Publisher

This book covers a broad group of wastes, from biowaste to hazardous waste, but primarily the largest (by mass and volume) group of wastes that are not hazardous, but also are not inert, and are problematic for three major reasons: (1) they are difficult to manage because of their volume: usually they are used in civil engineering as a common fill etc., where they are exposed to environmental conditions almost the same way as at disposal sites; (2) they are not geochemically stable and in the different periods of environmental exposure undergo transformations that might add hazardous properties to the material that are not displayed when it is freshly generated; (3) many designers and researchers in different countries involved in waste management are often not aware of time-delayed adverse environmental impact of some large-volume waste, and also do not consider some positive properties that may extend the area of their environmentally beneficial application.
Published: Elsevier Science an imprint of Elsevier Books Reference on
ISBN: 9780080541471
List price: $360.00
Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
Availability for Solid Waste: Assessment, Monitoring and Remediation
With a 30 day free trial you can read online for free
  1. This book can be read on up to 6 mobile devices.

Related Articles

Nautilus
1 min read
Science

Spark of Science: Robbert Dijkgraaf: The director of the Institute for Advanced Study on the wonders of his childhood attic.

Robbert Dijkgraaf will sometimes let himself drift back to his childhood attic in the Netherlands. It was there that he did some of his first physics experiments, playing with discarded binocular optics that his father kept stacked in boxes. As he has risen to take the leadership of the Institute for Advanced Study, one of the world’s most prestigious academic institutions, those early experiences have not lost their power. “It’s very important to go back to the origin of your passion,” he says. They have also helped to shape his ideas about science education. Like many educators we talk to, D
Nautilus
4 min read

Can Remnants of Ancient Life Show Us How to Live Wisely Into the Future?

This is part 2 of Vincent Ialenti’s report on how how to think about nuclear waste in the environment over the very long term. Also see part 1, which ran on Facts So Romantic yesterday. In the next decade, nuclear-waste experts in Finland and Sweden hope to build the world’s first-ever long-term storage repositories for spent nuclear fuel*. To keep this dangerous, high-level waste from leaking over the many thousands of years during which it will remain active, the repositories will rely on four main barriers: First, used-up nuclear fuel rods are inserted into large, cast-iron inserts. Second,
NPR
2 min read
Science

PHOTOS: Scientists Take To Washington To Stress A Nonpartisan Agenda

Attendees from across the country descended on the nation's capital to speak up for science. The March for Science unfolded on the National Mall in Washington, D.C., on Saturday, and in multiple cities around the world. Coinciding with Earth Day, the event drew researchers, educators and scientifically-minded people. The event kicked off with open teaching sessions on the Mall, followed by a rally near the Washington Monument, and then a march that traveled to the U.S. Capitol building. NPR spoke to some of the participants about why they decided to attend the March for Science. Brad Slocum, a