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From the Publisher

Readings in Cognitive Science: A Perspective from Psychology and Artificial Intelligence brings together important studies that fall in the intersection between artificial intelligence and cognitive psychology.
This book is composed of six chapters, and begins with the complex anatomy and physiology of the human brain. The next chapters deal with the components of cognitive science, such as the semantic memory, similarity and analogy, and learning. These chapters also consider the application of mental models, which represent the domain-specific knowledge needed to understand a dynamic system or natural physical phenomena. The remaining chapters discuss the concept of reasoning, problem solving, planning, vision, and imagery.
This book is of value to psychologists, psychiatrists, neurologists, and researchers who are interested in cognition.
Published: Elsevier Science an imprint of Elsevier Books Reference on
ISBN: 9781483214467
List price: $93.95
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