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From the Publisher

Generatingfunctionology provides information pertinent to generating functions and some of their uses in discrete mathematics. This book presents the power of the method by giving a number of examples of problems that can be profitably thought about from the point of view of generating functions.

Organized into five chapters, this book begins with an overview of the basic concepts of a generating function. This text then discusses the different kinds of series that are widely used as generating functions. Other chapters explain how to make much more precise estimates of the sizes of the coefficients of power series based on the analyticity of the function that is represented by the series. This book discusses as well the applications of the theory of generating functions to counting problems. The final chapter deals with the formal aspects of the theory of generating functions.

This book is a valuable resource for mathematicians and students.
Published: Academic Press an imprint of Elsevier Books Reference on
ISBN: 9781483276632
List price: $31.95
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