• book

From the Publisher

Mathematical modelling is often spoken of as a way of life, referring to habits of mind and to dependence on the power of mathematics to describe, explain, predict and control real phenomena. This book aims to encourage teachers to provide opportunities for students to model a variety of real phenomena appropriately matched to students’ mathematical backgrounds and interests from early stages of mathematical education. Habits, misconceptions, and mindsets about mathematics can present obstacles to university students’ acceptance of a ‘‘models-and-modelling perspective’’ at this stage of mathematics education. Without prior experience in building, interpreting and applying mathematical models, many students may never come to view and regard modelling as a way of life. The book records presentations at the ICTMA 11 conference held in Milwaukee, Wisconsin in 2003. Examines mathematical modelling as a way of life, referring to habits of mind and dependence on the power of mathematics to describe, explain, predict and control real phenomena Encourages teachers to provide students with opportunities to model a variety of real phenomena appropriately matched to students’ mathematical backgrounds and interests from early stages of mathematical education Records presentations at the ICTMA 11 conference held in Milwaukee, Wisconsin in 2003
Published: Elsevier Science an imprint of Elsevier Books Reference on
ISBN: 9780857099549
List price: $97.95
Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
Availability for Mathematical Modelling: A Way of Life - ICTMA 11
With a 30 day free trial you can read online for free
  1. This book can be read on up to 6 mobile devices.

Related Articles

Nautilus
1 min read
Science

Graphing Human Uniqueness

Throughout this issue, we’ve explored the question of whether humans are unique, and if so, in what ways. In one interactive piece, “The Vocabulary of Our Uniqueness,” we asked readers which words best described what makes us special. And here are the results. Readers cast 1,234 votes for 56 different terms, which we have grouped together thematically (and subjectively). This is obviously not a rigorously precise survey, but it’s enough to give a general snapshot of how people think of the question. The number one choice turned out to be “science,” which also included the terms “math” and “ast
Nautilus
10 min read
Science

How to Build a Search Engine for Mathematics: The Surprising Power of Neil Sloane’s Encyclopedia of Integer Sequences.: The surprising power of Neil Sloane’s Encyclopedia of Integer Sequences.

On the average summer Saturday, the mathematician Neil Sloane woke up to a crisis. “There are always crises,” he said— albeit crises of the teapot tempest variety. One Saturday over breakfast, he faced an inbox message titled “edits from outer space.” Without authorization, a contributor in France had deleted an entry in Sloane’s Online Encyclopedia of Integer Sequences, which, like Wikipedia, is powered by volunteer contributors and editors. But everyday, tending his encyclopedia like a garden, weeding and pruning and planting, Sloane also delights in the more pleasant surprises. On that same
The Atlantic
14 min read
Science

How Aristotle Created the Computer

The history of computers is often told as a history of objects, from the abacus to the Babbage engine up through the code-breaking machines of World War II. In fact, it is better understood as a history of ideas, mainly ideas that emerged from mathematical logic, an obscure and cult-like discipline that first developed in the 19th century. Mathematical logic was pioneered by philosopher-mathematicians, most notably George Boole and Gottlob Frege, who were themselves inspired by Leibniz’s dream of a universal “concept language,” and the ancient logical system of Aristotle. Mathematical logic wa