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Se sabe, aunque la Iglesia siempre ha pasado de puntillas sobre este hecho, que San Agustín, más tarde Padre de la Iglesia latina, tuvo en su juventud una amante que le dio un hijo al que amó con predilección. Vita brevis es la carta manuscrita que supuestamente Floria, su amante, le escribió al hilo de la lectura de sus Confesiones. En ella, con ironía y sarcasmo, critica a Agustín por haber abandonado el verdadero y auténtico amor humano para entregarse a uno divino, del que poco se sabe.
Published: Siruela on
ISBN: 9788498416251
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Availability for Vita brevis: La carta de Floria Emilia a Aurelio Agustín
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Considering the many classical allusions in this work, it is fitting that the conceit — of assuming a female persona writing to her lover — should come from classical literature (Ovid's Heroides). That the conceit as used in Gaarder's book was so effective is clear from the number of readers who entertain the idea that the letter is genuine.This is a short work, so it obviously can't be expected to reach the same scope as Sophie's World or the Solitaire Mystery, but even so, it lacks the philosophical acumen of the former and the sheer creativity of the latter. I can give you the thrust of the letter in one sentence: life is short, so you should enjoy it while you can. Aside from perhaps a few choice moments, I don't think you'll get much more out of this book than out of that sentence. You're welcome to try, but then perhaps life is too short?more
A fictional, philosophical letter from Saint Augustine's former lover, Flora Aemilia. The book is also known as 'Vita Brevis' which I like better than 'That Same Flower.' (Also the cover design here, with a tiny tiny picture of Augustine popping out of a naked woman's side is a bit silly).I read this a long time ago. I found it compelling except for the shakey framing device of the author 'discovering' the text of Flora Aemilia's letter to Augustine. I think it might have worked better without it.more

Reviews

Considering the many classical allusions in this work, it is fitting that the conceit — of assuming a female persona writing to her lover — should come from classical literature (Ovid's Heroides). That the conceit as used in Gaarder's book was so effective is clear from the number of readers who entertain the idea that the letter is genuine.This is a short work, so it obviously can't be expected to reach the same scope as Sophie's World or the Solitaire Mystery, but even so, it lacks the philosophical acumen of the former and the sheer creativity of the latter. I can give you the thrust of the letter in one sentence: life is short, so you should enjoy it while you can. Aside from perhaps a few choice moments, I don't think you'll get much more out of this book than out of that sentence. You're welcome to try, but then perhaps life is too short?more
A fictional, philosophical letter from Saint Augustine's former lover, Flora Aemilia. The book is also known as 'Vita Brevis' which I like better than 'That Same Flower.' (Also the cover design here, with a tiny tiny picture of Augustine popping out of a naked woman's side is a bit silly).I read this a long time ago. I found it compelling except for the shakey framing device of the author 'discovering' the text of Flora Aemilia's letter to Augustine. I think it might have worked better without it.more
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