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From the Publisher

Science, as we all know refers to a body of knowledge itself, of the type that can be rationally explained and reliably applied. Science is a unique combination of Theory and Practice. A thorough knowledge of this subject is almost impossible without proper practical demonstrations which are also termed as Scientific Activities or Projects.

In this book, 71+10 Science Activities, the author has taken up the simple facts and principles of Science, such as: Air Force, Pressure, Weight, Emulsification, Osmosis, Gravity and Motion, Rotation, Types of Energy, Vibrations, Good and Bad Conductors of Electricity, Experiments with Magnets, Light and Sound for children, and projected them in a very simple and lucid language for the readers-- particularly the school kids who can easily perform these activities at home or school , of course with the help and able guidance of their parents, elders or teachers.

The book is meant for children of all age groups, particularly from 6 to 13, who can perform and experience the thrill of these fun-filled experiments as well as learn the basic principles of Science easily and quickly.

Therefore, this book is a must read for all school kids, especially those from classes, five to nine to learn as well enjoy conducting all the 81 Fascinating Activities listed in the book, each explaining or proving some scientific theory or law.

So go ahead children, enjoy reading, learning and experimenting!

Published: V&S Publishers on
ISBN: 9789350574010
List price: $6.00
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