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From the Publisher

Firsthand testimonies by 20 leaders in culture and science of their interactions with the Akashic field

• Provides important evidence for the authenticity of nonmaterial contact that human beings have with each other and with the cosmos

• Demonstrates that the increasing frequency and intensity of these experiences is evidence of a widespread spiritual resurgence

• Includes contributions by Alex Grey, Stanislav Grof, Stanley Krippner, Swami Kriyananda, Edgar Mitchell, and others

Knowing or feeling that we are all connected to each other and to the cosmos by more than our eyes and ears is not a new notion but one as old as humanity. Traditional indigenous societies were fully aware of nonmaterial connections and incorporated them into their daily life. The modern world, however, continues to dismiss and even deny these intangible links--taking as real only that which is physically manifest or proved “scientifically.” Consequently our mainstream culture is spiritually impoverished, and the world we live in has become disenchanted.

In The Akashic Experience, 20 leading authorities in fields such as psychiatry, physics, philosophy, anthropology, natural healing, near death experience, and spirituality offer firsthand accounts of interactions with a cosmic memory field that can transmit information to people without having to go through the senses. Their experiences with the Akashic field are now validated and supported by evidence from cutting-edge sciences that shows that there is a cosmic memory field that contains all information--past, present, and future. The increasing frequency and intensity of these Akashic experiences are an integral part of a large-scale spiritual resurgence and evolution of human consciousness that is under way today.

Topics: Spirituality , Meditation, Mindfulness, Cosmos, Telepathy, Philosophical, and Essays

Published: Inner Traditions on
ISBN: 9781594779947
List price: $16.95
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