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The Man with the Pan Pipes

AND OTHER STORIES

[ILLUSTRATED EDITION]

By

Mary Louisa Molesworth

Illustrated by W. J. Morgan

ILLUSTRATED &

PUBLISHED BY

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ISBN: 978-605-9285-77-3

About Author:

Mary Louisa Molesworth, Stewart (1839 – 1921) was an English writer of children's stories who wrote for children under the name ofMrs Molesworth. Her first novels, for adult readers, Lover and Husband(1869) to Cicely (1874), appeared under the pseudonym of Ennis Graham. Her name occasionally appears in print as M. L. S. Molesworth.

She was born in Rotterdam, a daughter of Charles Augustus Stewart (1809–1873) who later became a rich merchant in Manchester and his wife Agnes Janet Wilson (1810–1883). Mary had three brothers and two sisters. She was educated in Great Britain and Switzerland: much of her girlhood was spent in Manchester. In 1861 she married Major R. Molesworth, nephew of Viscount Molesworth; they legally separated in 1879.

Mrs Molesworth is best known as a writer of books for the young, such as Tell Me a Story (1875), Carrots (1876), The Cuckoo Clock (1877), The Tapestry Room (1879), and A Christmas Child (1880). She has been called the Jane Austen of the nursery, while The Carved Lions (1895) is probably her masterpiece. In the judgement of Roger Lancelyn Green:

Mary Louisa Molesworth typified late Victorian writing for girls. Aimed at girls too old for fairies and princesses but too young for Austen and the Brontës, books by Molesworth had their share of amusement, but they also had a good deal of moral instruction. The girls reading Molesworth would grow up to be mothers; thus, the books emphasized Victorian notions of duty and self-sacrifice.

Typical of the time, her young child characters often use a lisping style, and words may be misspelt to represent children's speech—jography for geography, for instance.

She took an interest in supernatural fiction. In 1888, she published a collection of supernatural tales under the title Four Ghost Stories, and in 1896 a similar collection of six tales under the title Uncanny Stories. In addition to those, her volume Studies and Stories includes a ghost story entitled Old Gervais and her Summer Stories for Boys and Girls includes Not exactly a ghost story.

A new edition of The Cuckoo Clock was published in 1914.

She died in 1921 and is buried in Brompton Cemetery, London.

* * * * *

THE MAN WITH THE PAN-PIPES

AND OTHER STORIES

BY

Mrs. MOLESWORTH

ILLUSTRATED BY W. J. MORGAN

Society for Promoting Christian Knowledge
LONDON

LONDON:

ENGRAVED AND PRINTED BY EDMUND EVANS

RACQUET-CT., FLEET-ST., E.C.

CHAPTER I.

hen I was a little girl, which is now a good many years ago, there came to spend some time with us a cousin who had been brought up in Germany. She was almost grown-up—to me, a child of six or seven, she seemed quite grown-up; in reality, she was, I suppose, about fifteen or sixteen. She was a bright, kind, good-natured girl, very anxious to please and amuse her little English cousins, especially me, as I was the only girl. But she had not had much to do with small children; above all, delicate children, and she was so strong and hearty herself that she did not understand anything about nervous fears and fancies. I think I was rather delicate, at least, I was very fanciful; and as I was quiet and gave very little trouble, nobody noticed how constantly I was reading, generally in a corner by myself. I now see that I read far too many stories, for even of good and harmless things it is possible to have too much. In those days, fortunately for me, there were not nearly so many books for children, so, as I read very fast, I was often obliged to read the same stories over and over again. This was much better for me than always getting new tales and galloping through them, as I see many children do now-a-days, but still I think I lived too much in story-book world, and it was well for me when other things forced me to become more, what is called, practical.

My cousin Meta was full of life and activity, and after awhile she grew tired of always finding me buried in my books.

It isn't good for you, Addie, she said. Such a dot as you are, to be always poking about in a corner reading.

She was quite right, and when mamma's attention was drawn to it she agreed with Meta, and I was given some pretty fancy-work to do and some new dolls to dress, and, above all, I was made to play about in the garden a good deal more. It was not much of a garden, for our home was then in a town, still it was better than being indoors. And very often when kind Meta saw me looking rather forlorn, for I got quickly tired with outdoor games, she would come and sit with me in the arbour, or walk about—up and down a long