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Romancing the Beat: Story Structure for Romance Novels: How to Write Kissing Books, #1

Romancing the Beat: Story Structure for Romance Novels: How to Write Kissing Books, #1

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Romancing the Beat: Story Structure for Romance Novels: How to Write Kissing Books, #1

ratings:
4.5/5 (7 ratings)
Length:
80 pages
53 minutes
Publisher:
Released:
Apr 19, 2016
ISBN:
9781519990723
Format:
Book

Description

What makes a romance novel a romance? How do you write a kissing book?

 

Writing a well-structured romance isn't the same as writing any other genre—something the popular novel and screenwriting guides don't address. The romance arc is made up of its own story beats, and the external plot and theme need to be braided to the romance arc—not the other way around.

Told in conversational (and often irreverent) prose, Romancing the Beat can be read like you are sitting down to coffee with romance editor and author Gwen Hayes while she explains story structure. The way she does with her clients. Some of whom are regular inhabitants of the New York Times and USA Today bestseller lists.

Romancing the Beat is a recipe, not a rigid system. The beats don't care if you plot or outline before you write, or if you pants your way through the drafts and do a "beat check" when you're revising. Pantsers and plotters are both welcome.

 

So sit down, grab a cuppa, and let's talk about kissing books.

Publisher:
Released:
Apr 19, 2016
ISBN:
9781519990723
Format:
Book

About the author

Gwen Hayes writes romance for adult and teen readers. You know...kissing books.  Gwen is represented by Deidre Knight of the Knight Agency.


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Inside the book

Top quotes

  • But you need to hint that the last thing this person wants is to meet the love of his or her life right now. In fact, H1 might not even know that he or she is unhappy. But you need to show the reader that something is missing and that something is H2.

  • Even if you plot out of order, the one thing you must know is your character’s flaw/wound/misconception about love. Don’t proceed without it. Remember, everything in your book is seen through the lens of the wounds of your characters.

  • Your characters each show themselves to you and the reader with a gaping hole in the place their hearts should be. At the end of your book, they go from hole-hearted to whole-hearted via love conquering all.

  • This goal may not be the Big Plot of your story. But it’s something they want or think they want. Give that goal some stakes, too.

  • Your book needs to show the process your protagonists endure to change so that by the end of the book they are able to give their whole heart to someone else and accept love in return.

Book Preview

Romancing the Beat - Gwen Hayes

here:

What is What

WHAT THIS BOOK IS:

This guide is for a very specific niche. I don’t go into depth about all the elements of great storytelling or story structure. I am going to delve only into the specifics of the internal/romance arc for romance novels, which is especially helpful for those who write shorter stories and category length.

A new tool for your writer’s toolbox.

A road map of the romantic journey your characters take in order to earn their happy ending by facing their biggest fears.

A vehicle for me to drop ‘80s references.

No, seriously. This book is littered with them.

Who this book is for:

Romance writers who have been told their books focus too much on the external plot.

Romance writers who know something is missing from their book, but are not sure where to look to find it.

Non-romance writers looking to strengthen the romantic elements of a different genre book.

Why I wrote this book:

It’s the first step in my world domination plan. I’m saving the world...one love story at a time.

Theme

BEFORE WE GET INTO the actual beats, let’s talk about theme. Many authors tell stories in order to explore themes of importance to them and maybe even persuade the reader to consider those ideals. Some just write stories and let the scholars of the future deduce theme from their works. I’m not concerned with the other themes. You are writing a romance, so your theme is already picked out for you.

Love Conquers All

In a broad sense, all romance books are about one theme: Love conquers all.

Romance readers have genre expectations just like any other genre. The biggest of those expectations is the HEA (happily ever after) or the HFN (happy for now). If love doesn’t conquer all at the end of your story, you didn’t write a romance. You might have a great story with romantic elements, but if your characters don’t have a happy resolution, then you need to find a different shelf for your finished book to live on. That’s not a bad thing; it’s just not a romance

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