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The Collected Poems of Emily Dickinson

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The Collected Poems of Emily Dickinson

ratings:
4/5 (320 ratings)
Length:
323 pages
1 hour
Released:
Jan 1, 2016
ISBN:
9781512405330
Format:
Book

Description

This collection of Emily Dickinson's work contains 444 of the nearly 1,800 poems that the prolific yet reclusive American poet privately penned during her lifetime. Although her bold and non-traditional writing style met with mixed reviews when first published, Dickinson is now considered one of America's greatest poets. Included here are such famous poems as "Because I could not stop for Death", "I'm nobody! Who are you?", and "Hope is the thing with feathers". Themes of love, loss, death, and immortality imbue Dickinson's work with a timeless quality; her unconventional poetry continues to provide insight into the human condition. This is an unabridged compilation of three series of Dickinson's poetry edited and published by her friends after her death—the first series in 1890, the second in 1891, and the third in 1896.

Released:
Jan 1, 2016
ISBN:
9781512405330
Format:
Book

About the author

Emily Dickinson was an American poet. She was born in Amherst, Massachusetts, into a prominent family with strong ties to its community.

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What people think about The Collected Poems of Emily Dickinson

4.0
320 ratings / 10 Reviews
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  • (5/5)
    A collection of the best of the best. Emily Dickinson is one of the most original poets of her time, and refused to follow the straight jacket rules often imposed on poets; as a result, she was not published widely in her lifetime (though she did have one or two poems in a magazine). Since that time, her original style has become much more appreciated, and this book collects a small sampling of her work. A good starting point for anyone who isn't familiar with Dickinson, because it gives a wide range of her works, and many of her all time best are included.
  • (4/5)
    I am marking this as finished but really I had to return it to the library before I was done. I read more than half and have read many of these poems before in other collections & anthologies so I feel comfortable with my rating.
  • (5/5)
    She wasn't appreciated by her family or the public of that day, but contrary to what I once assumed, this did not make her bitter. Poetry tends to be either traditional and soothing or modern and frayed, and Emily is definitely traditional and soothing. She bore no ill will to anybody, regardless of her social circumstances. They may not have liked her, but she liked them.............I mean, there can be, there can be a certain sadness there, but it is such a shy and tender sadness, that it isn't at all like the way people talk. These days we are used to people shouting, and sometimes you forget what a shy girl is really like.
  • (4/5)
    I am deplorably little read in poetry. I have ambitions to read more of this highly visual and emotional literary art form, one with amazing precedents and history, but I rarely do. I bought this collection of poems by one of my country's esteemed poets many years back, and have finally taken the time to read her poetry. Despite my limited expertise, I enjoyed her work. The poems were evocative of nature and eternity, and expressed intense emotions. They felt very intimate, but appealed to universal feelings. Her poems about nature were lush and full of awe, and revealed her deep love of the outdoors. Many of the natural elements described also functioned as metaphors for her feelings or ideas about life and love. My particular favorites were the poems that explored death and life and the mysteries of eternity. I have analyzed much more fiction and novels than poetry, and I know I am lacking in terminology, but I felt the rhythm of her meters (according to others she often used tetrameter rather than pentameter) and the effect of her abrupt breaks and pauses. According to one writer I unearthed online, Dickinson used "diamond hard language", and I find that a beautiful descriptor that accurately captures a sense of her words.The book I own is a complete collection of her poetry. I would love to examine these poems more deeply someday, with other people who are interested in delving into intricacies of subject and form. Whether I will actually do so is unknown; in the meantime, I am delighted that I finally acquainted myself with the work of an amazing poet. She has inspired me to read more poetry. I heard a speaker say once that people get too worked up about poetry, that they view it as a chore when it is an experience that should be felt and enjoyed. I am trying to drop my apprehensions and enjoy poetry, even if it means that I don't understand or get everything out of it that I can. Emily Dickinson was a lovely starting point.
  • (1/5)
    This edition advertises itself as "The Orginal Published Version" - which means, of course, that it's the version that was edited all to heck by a couple of literary hacks in New York. Until I actually tried to sit down and read it, I hadn't realized just how much the changes did matter. Poor Emily.
  • (5/5)
    Dickinson is one of my favorite poets. I love the convenience of this collection.
  • (5/5)
    Utterly brilliant.

    Although it's marked by time - and what really isn't? - in a way which isn't my marred, modern cup of tea, the sheer potency of Dickinson's language, rhythm, coinage of words and non-rhymes win me over completely, and take me to another level totally.

    I shan't say more on the poetry itself, but the imagery painted is sharp, veering from "the usual" in a way that has lived for more than a hundred years and will continue living forever, I'm sure.

    While this collection does not contain all of her poems, it is annotated with short sentences on names, places and references, e.g. to passages from the christian bible and other poets.

    This collection's only real flaw: it's too short.
  • (5/5)
    Not sure how much "editing" Emily's friends and relatives contributed to this collection, virtually all of which are poems which Emily did not publish or even title before her death in 1886. For example, the stark perplexity of "Going to Heaven!"And it takes but little understanding to come to the realization that Emily's decisions about publication were utterly compromised by the reversals, hypocrisies, and gravity of the Civil War. And the relentless fraud of the Churches who prayed through all the suffering on all sides.Finally, my readings largely concur with those who "see" that Emily Dickinson spoke robust and bold truth, with naked beauty, and unrelenting kindness. Example for all who suffer curiosity and compassion:Going to heaven!I don't know when,Pray do not ask me how,--Indeed, I'm too astonishedTo think of answering you!Going to heaven!--How dim it sounds!And yet it will be doneAs sure as flocks go home at nightUnto the shepherd's arm!Perhaps you're going too!Who knows?If you should get there first,Save just a little place for meClose to the two I lost!The smallest "robe" will fit me,And just a bit of "crown";For you know we do not mind our dressWhen we are going home.I'm glad I don't believe it,For it would stop my breath,And I'd like to look a little moreAt such a curious earth!I am glad they did believe itWhom I have never foundSince the mighty autumn afternoonI left them in the ground.
  • (2/5)
    This book is formatted well, like most of the Barnes & Noble classics. There’s a scholarly introduction, a brief biography with timeline, specific words defined on the page when necessary (sometimes there’s some overkill on this point, but it’s hard to know what audience will know what), and supplementary materials at the end, including questions for discussion or deeper contemplation. The poems themselves are divided into five sections based on theme (although for the life of me I’m still not sure what the final section “The Single Hound” is supposed to be about, and I think most of these poems found here could have easily fit into the earlier topics).However, I couldn’t rate this book any higher because as much as I thought I would love Emily Dickinson’s poetry, I didn’t. Her poems were too short for me to get into them or appreciate a deeper meaning in most cases. I found that I would start to get a bit into a poem and it didn’t last long enough to sustain interest or really tell a story. Out of this whole book of hundreds of her poems, I only truly enjoyed a handful. I didn’t find her style very interesting at all -- her words and descriptions were not vivid, lovely, or quite frankly, poetic. I don’t particularly care that she doesn’t follow a specific form or that she doesn’t always rhyme, but it would annoy me when she starts to rhyme but stops half way or does a half-hearted attempt at rhyming. It took me more than a year to finish this book and towards the end I just wanted it to be done already. Other people may love her, but Dickinson’s poetry is just not to my taste, and I much prefer my Edna St. Vincent Millay.
  • (3/5)
    The Collected Poems of Emily Dickinson contains a sizeable sample of the total works of the reclusive poet, who only came to prominence after her death. Containing 593 poems separated into five different themes, roughly a third of her overall productivity, this collection gives the reader a wonderful look into the talent of a woman who hid her art not only from the world but also her own family. Besides nearly 600 poems of Dickinson’s work, the reader is given a 25 page introduction to the poet and an analysis of her work by Dr. Rachel Wetzsteon who helps reveal the mysterious artist as best as she can and help the reader understand her work better. Although neither Wetzsteon’s introduction and analysis nor Dickinson’s work is wanting, the fact that this collection gives only a sample of the poet’s work is its main and only flaw.