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Torii Kiyonaga: Colour Plates

Torii Kiyonaga: Colour Plates

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Torii Kiyonaga: Colour Plates

Length:
104 pages
6 minutes
Publisher:
Released:
Oct 18, 2016
ISBN:
9788822857071
Format:
Book

Description

Torii Kiyonaga (1752 – 1815) was a Japanese ukiyo-e artist of the Torii school. Originally Sekiguchi Shinsuke, the son of an Edo bookseller, he took on Torii Kiyonaga as an art name. Although not biologically related to the Torii family, he became head of the group after the death of his adoptive father and teacher Torii Kiyomitsu. In the field of bijin-ga, only the works of Suzuki Harunobu and a handful of others are generally regarded comparable with those of Kiyonaga. The women in Kiyonaga's prints are often described as seeming fuller and more mature than those of his predecessor Harunobu, whose prints often depict women who seem younger and thinner. Though a difference of personal styles accounts for this primarily, it also comes in part from Kiyonaga's use of larger sheets of paper. Also, a great proportion of Kiyonaga's work is in diptych or triptych form, making the work seem larger and more impressive overall.

Kiyonaga's Kabuki prints, depicting scenes on stage and the like, show a great attention to detail, and seek to depict real Kabuki scenes, rather than idealized versions.

Publisher:
Released:
Oct 18, 2016
ISBN:
9788822857071
Format:
Book

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Foreword

Torii Kiyonaga (1752 – 1815) was a Japanese ukiyo-e artist of the Torii school. Originally Sekiguchi Shinsuke, the son of an Edo bookseller, he took on Torii Kiyonaga as an art name. Although not biologically related to the Torii family, he became head of the group after the death of his adoptive father and teacher Torii Kiyomitsu.

The master Kiyomitsu died in 1785; since his son died young, and Kiyotsune, Kiyonaga's senior, was a less promising artist, Kiyonaga was the obvious choice to succeed Kiyomitsu to leadership of the Torii school. However, he delayed this for two years, likely devoting time to his bijin-ga and realizing the immense responsibility that would fall on his shoulders once he took over the school. Thus, in 1787, he began organizing the production of kabuki signboards and the like, which the school

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