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Till We Have Faces: A Myth Retold

Till We Have Faces: A Myth Retold

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Ratings:
Rating: 4.5 out of 5 stars4.5/5 (52 ratings)
Length: 292 pages5 hours

Description

Till We Have Faces is the retelling of the myth of Cupid and Psyche by C.S. Lewis.
The author brilliantly reimagines the story of Cupid and Psyche, and he tells it from the perspective of Psyche’s ugly, bitter sister, Orual, for the first half of the novel. Orual loves Psyche to a harmful and dangerous extent and is deeply jealous that the god of love himself, Cupid, is the target of Psyche’s affections. This sets Orual on a deeply troubled and dark path of moral development.The story takes place in the fictitious kingdom of Glome, a primitive city-state where the people have occasional contact with Hellenistic Greece. This novel is a smart examination of envy, betrayal, loss, blame, grief, guilt, and conversion. In this, his final novel, Lewis reminds us of our own failings and the role that a much higher power plays in our lives.
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Till We Have Faces: A Myth Retold

Book Actions

Start Reading

Book Information

Till We Have Faces: A Myth Retold

Ratings:
Rating: 4.5 out of 5 stars4.5/5 (52 ratings)
Length: 292 pages5 hours

Description

Till We Have Faces is the retelling of the myth of Cupid and Psyche by C.S. Lewis.
The author brilliantly reimagines the story of Cupid and Psyche, and he tells it from the perspective of Psyche’s ugly, bitter sister, Orual, for the first half of the novel. Orual loves Psyche to a harmful and dangerous extent and is deeply jealous that the god of love himself, Cupid, is the target of Psyche’s affections. This sets Orual on a deeply troubled and dark path of moral development.The story takes place in the fictitious kingdom of Glome, a primitive city-state where the people have occasional contact with Hellenistic Greece. This novel is a smart examination of envy, betrayal, loss, blame, grief, guilt, and conversion. In this, his final novel, Lewis reminds us of our own failings and the role that a much higher power plays in our lives.
Read More