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The Food Question - Health and Economy

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Length: 99 pages1 hour

Summary

This book was planned before Food Conservation was by the mass considered seriously. The writers of the various articles are thoroughly qualified to speak where they have spoken. They are practical, conscientious, Christian, and have at heart the best in the needs of humanity. Every one strikes a major chord in the song of healthful, economical living. The recipes are from the author of "Food and Cookery," who has had a score of years' experience in every station and phase of the preparation of food, under French, English, German, and Spanish chefs. He has been second cook in the Calumet Club of Chicago, the California Club, Los Angeles, and in many leading hotelsin various cities. For ten years, he has given his best thought and study to the preparation of the best in food, scientific, palatable, wholesome, and economic, most of this time in the Sanitarium and College of Medical Missionaries, Loma Linda, California. Special attention is called to the valuable tables of Food Elements, and to the newly demonstrated values of vitamines and the substances which destroy them.
We are grateful for the kind word spoken by Dr. Ray Lyman Wilbur, president of Stanford University, and first assistant to Mr. Hoover in the Federal Food Administration Department; also for the help and suggestions of Dr. Newton Evans, president of the College of Medical Evangelists, of Loma Linda, California.
The little book will, we believe, not only meet present needs, but be a safe counselor in the years to come.
Hoover   says—
Hoover
©International Film
"Letthe American woman stop, before anything is thrown away; and let her ask herself, 'Can it be used in my home, in some other home, orin the production of further food supply by feeding it to animals used also for food?'
"Let her order her meals so that there will be plenty—for there is plenty—but not too much.
"The intelligent woman of America must make a proper study of food ratios, sothat the most nutritious foods will appear in their proper proportions on the home table.
"The man who complains at the result of his wife's efforts to conserve food is doing her an inexcusable injury. He should never hesitate to coöperate in her wise conservation plans."
Wilson says—
"Inno direction can they [the women of America] so greatly assist as by enlisting in the service of the food administration and cheerfully accepting its direction and advice. By so doing, they will increase the surplus of food available for our own army and for exports to the allies. To provide adequate supplies for the coming year is of absolutely vital importance to the conduct of the war; and without a very conscientious elimination of waste and very strict economy in ourfood consumption, we cannot hope to fulfill this primary duty."

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