KATCHA AND THE DEVIL - A European Fairy Tale by Anon E. Mouse by Anon E. Mouse - Read Online
KATCHA AND THE DEVIL - A European Fairy Tale
0% of KATCHA AND THE DEVIL - A European Fairy Tale completed

About

Summary

ISSN: 2397-9607 Issue 321
In this 321st issue of the Baba Indaba’s Children's Stories series, Baba Indaba narrates the European Fairy Tale "KATCHA AND THE DEVIL”.

ONCE upon a time, long, long ago and far, far away, there was once a woman named Katcha who lived in a village where she owned her own cottage and garden. She had money besides but little good it did her because she was such an ill-tempered vixen that nobody, not even the poorest laborer, would marry her. Nobody would even work for her, no matter what she paid, for she couldn't open her mouth without scolding, and whenever she scolded she raised her shrill voice until you could hear it a mile away. The older she grew the worse she became until by the time she was forty she was as sour as vinegar.

Now as it always happens in a village, every Sunday afternoon there was a dance either at the burgomaster's, or at the tavern. As soon as the bagpipes sounded, the boys all crowded into the room and the girls gathered outside and looked in the windows. Katcha was always the first at the window. The music would strike up and the boys would beckon the girls to come in and dance, but no one ever beckoned Katcha.

One Sunday afternoon as she was hurrying to the tavern she thought to herself: "Here I am getting old and yet I've never once danced with a boy! Plague take it, to-day I'd dance with the devil if he asked me!" Suddenly a stranger in hunter's green came in. He sat down at a table near Katcha and ordered drink. When the serving maid brought the beer, he reached over to Katcha and asked her to drink with him. At first she was much taken back at this attention, then she pursed her lips coyly and pretended to refuse, but finally she accepted…….

Just who was Katcha about to dance with? Was it the devil himself? When the devil grants a favour, there’s always a price to pay. Just what will the devil’s price be for Katcha? But, has the devil bitten off more than he can chew with Katcha? Well to find the answers to these questions, and others you may have, you will have to download and read this story to find out!

Baba Indaba is a fictitious Zulu storyteller who narrates children's stories from around the world. Baba Indaba translates as "Father of Stories".

Each issue also has a "WHERE IN THE WORLD - LOOK IT UP" section, where young readers are challenged to look up a place on a map somewhere in the world. The place, town or city is relevant to the story. HINT - use Google maps.

33% of the profit from the sale of this book will be donated to charities.
INCLUDES LINKS TO DOWNLOAD 8 FREE STORIES
Published: StreetLib on
ISBN: 9788826441597
Availability for KATCHA AND THE DEVIL - A European Fairy Tale by Anon E. M...
With a 30 day free trial you can read online for free
  1. This book can be read on up to 6 mobile devices.

Reviews

Book Preview

KATCHA AND THE DEVIL - A European Fairy Tale - Anon E. Mouse

You've reached the end of this preview. Sign up to read more!
Page 1 of 1

KATCHA AND THE DEVIL

A Fairy Tale

Baba Indaba Children’s Stories

Published By

Abela Publishing, London

2017

KATCHA AND THE DEVIL

Typographical arrangement of this edition

©Abela Publishing 2017

This book may not be reproduced in its current format

in any manner in any media, or transmitted

by any means whatsoever, electronic,

electrostatic, magnetic tape, or mechanical

(including photocopy, file or video recording,

internet web sites, blogs, wikis, or any other

information storage and retrieval system)

except as permitted by law

without the prior written permission

of the publisher.

Abela Publishing,

London, United Kingdom

2017

Baba Indaba Children’s Stories

ISSN 2397-9607

Issue 321

Email:

Books@AbelaPublishing.com

Website:

www.AbelaPublishing.com

An Introduction to Baba Indaba

Baba Indaba, pronounced Baaba Indaaba, lived in Africa a long-long time ago. Indeed, this story was first told by Baba Indaba to the