Savannah Dawn (Unconsecrated Visions) by Janna Hill by Janna Hill - Read Online

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Savannah Dawn (Unconsecrated Visions) - Janna Hill

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Hill

Copyright © 2013 Janna Hill

All rights reserved . No part of this book may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means without permission in writing from the author.

All characters appearing in this work are fictitious. Any resemblance to real persons, living or dead is purely coincidental.

Dedication

To all of the dreamers in this realm.

Table of Contents

Copyright

Dedication

Preface

Chapter One

Chapter Two

About the Author

Every young girl has dreams. Some dream of being a supermodel or a nurse, a doctor or a fireman, a teacher, a writer or a rock star. Savannah Dawn has dreams too. But she mostly dreams of a life without nightmares. 

Chapter 1

My name is Savannah Dawn and I was named for the place of my conception, whatever that means. I’ll be eleven years old come next March. I love to swim and I hate school. I guess that’s all I know to say about myself except sometimes I see things... like in a dream. Not the stuff most folks talk about. I’ve never dreamed of falling off a cliff or being naked in public and besides those things aren’t scary. As a matter of fact, I think dreams like that are silly. There aren’t any cliffs around here and the only time I take my clothes off is to bathe and then I put them right back on.

The dreams used to bother me but they don’t anymore. When I was younger, I would wake up crying in the middle of the night. Mama would bring me a glass of milk and sit beside me in the dark. I’d tell her what I saw and she’d say, they’re just nightmares honey; nothing but unconsecrated visions.

As I got older I felt like Mama didn’t want to hear about the things that troubled my slumber. A few times it seemed to rile her, so I learned to stay quiet and get my own milk. When she mentioned it to the doctor, I told him I didn’t see things anymore. But I did. 

Most times what I dream comes to pass but every so often it doesn’t, and that’s a good thing. It gets tiresome seeing all the sorrow in people’s past and the tragedy some are headed for. Too bad I never saw what lay in store for Papa; it would have saved us all a heap of sorrow.

Preacher Zeb calls them revelations and says I shouldn’t tell a soul