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HBR Guide to Making Every Meeting Matter (HBR Guide Series)

HBR Guide to Making Every Meeting Matter (HBR Guide Series)


HBR Guide to Making Every Meeting Matter (HBR Guide Series)

Length:
200 pages
2 hours
Released:
Nov 15, 2016
ISBN:
9781633692183
Format:
Book

Description

Make every minute count.

Your calendar is full, and yet your meetings don’t always seem to advance your work. Problems often arise with unrealistic or vague agendas, off-track conversations, tuned-out participants who don’t know why they’re there, and follow-up notes that no one reads—or acts on. Meetings can feel like a waste of time. But when you invest a little energy in preparing yourself and your participants, you’ll stay focused, solve problems, gain consensus, and leave each meeting ready to take action.

With input from over 20 experts combined with useful checklists, sample agendas, and follow-up memos, the HBR Guide to Making Every Meeting Matter will teach you how to:

  • Set and communicate your meeting’s purpose
  • Invite the right people
  • Prepare an achievable agenda
  • Moderate a lively conversation
  • Regain control of a wayward meeting
  • Ensure follow-through without babysitting or haranguing

Arm yourself with the advice you need to succeed on the job, from a source you trust. Packed with how-to essentials from leading experts, the HBR Guides provide smart answers to your most pressing work challenges.

Released:
Nov 15, 2016
ISBN:
9781633692183
Format:
Book

About the author



Inside the book

Top quotes

  • Note whether the purpose of the topic is to share information, seek input for a decision, or make a decision.

  • Share updates and review progress-to-date, including major milestones or upcoming activities (ask and answer “What did I do? What will I do?”).  •Identify questions and concerns related to progress (ask and answer “What are the potential roadblocks?”).

  • Outside general relationship-build-ing, consider that a business meeting has only three functional purposes:  1.To inform and bring people up to speed.  2.To seek input from people.  3.To ask for approval.

  • As a starting point, three to five short bullet points or sentences that articulate what you want to accomplish is more than enough.

  • Keep the meeting as small as possible. No more than seven people.

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HBR Guide to Making Every Meeting Matter (HBR Guide Series) - Harvard Business Review

HBR Guide to

Making Every Meeting Matter

Harvard Business Review Guides

Arm yourself with the advice you need to succeed on the job, from the most trusted brand in business. Packed with how-to essentials from leading experts, the HBR Guides provide smart answers to your most pressing work challenges.

The titles include:

HBR Guide to Better Business Writing

HBR Guide to Building Your Business Case

HBR Guide to Buying a Small Business

HBR Guide to Coaching Employees

HBR Guide to Dealing with Conflict

HBR Guide to Delivering Effective Feedback

HBR Guide to Finance Basics for Managers

HBR Guide to Getting the Mentoring You Need

HBR Guide to Getting the Right Job

HBR Guide to Getting the Right Work Done

HBR Guide to Leading Teams

HBR Guide to Making Every Meeting Matter

HBR Guide to Managing Stress at Work

HBR Guide to Managing Up and Across

HBR Guide to Negotiating

HBR Guide to Networking

HBR Guide to Office Politics

HBR Guide to Persuasive Presentations

HBR Guide to Project Management

HBR Guide to

Making Every Meeting Matter

HARVARD BUSINESS REVIEW PRESS

Boston, Massachusetts

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For details and discount information for both print and ebook formats, contact booksales@harvardbusiness.org, tel. 800–988-0886, or www.hbr.org/bulksales.

Copyright 2016 Harvard Business School Publishing Corporation

All rights reserved

No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in or introduced into a retrieval system, or transmitted, in any form, or by any means (electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording, or otherwise), without the prior permission of the publisher. Requests for permission should be directed to permissions@hbsp.harvard.edu, or mailed to Permissions, Harvard Business School Publishing, 60 Harvard Way, Boston, Massachusetts 02163.

The web addresses referenced in this book were live and correct at the time of the book’s publication but may be subject to change.

Library of Congress Cataloging-in-Publication Data

Title: HBR guide to making every meeting matter.

Other titles: Harvard business review guides.

Description: Boston, Massachusetts : Harvard Business Review Press, [2016] |

Series: Harvard Business Review guides

Identifiers: LCCN 2016025614 | ISBN 9781633692176 (pbk.)

Subjects: LCSH: Business meetings—Handbooks, manuals, etc. | Business meetings—Planning—Handbooks, manuals, etc.

Classification: LCC HF5734.5 .H397 2016 | DDC 658.4/56—dc23 LC record available at https://lccn.loc.gov/2016025614

eISBN: 9781633692183

What You’ll Learn

We all know what we’re supposed to do to run meetings effectively, but we seldom do them well. Why? Perhaps we think it’s just not worth the time to clarify what we hope to accomplish, craft an agenda, handpick participants, issue prework, and send out follow-up notes that detail key decisions and next steps. So we run meetings off the cuff or saddle participants with an overly ambitious agenda we have no hope of working through. Other meeting problems feel beyond our control. People nod their heads in our decision-making meeting but then show their true feelings with their lack of follow-through. Derailers. Latecomers. Blowhards. Nonparticipants. People who bring their agenda to your meeting.

The best way to prevent or overcome any of these obstacles is thoughtful and thorough preparation. This guide offers tips and scripts for curbing inappropriate behavior and making your meetings easier to prepare for, more efficient to conduct—and more productive.

You’ll learn how to:

Determine whether you even need to meet

Prepare a realistic agenda

Identify why you’re meeting—and articulate your purpose to attendees

Orchestrate group decision making

Prevent implementation roadblocks by giving participants equal airtime

Cope with chronic latecomers, windbags, and other people problems

Turn around a bad meeting

Run any type of meeting—from a status stand-up to a one-on-one walking check-in to a strategy off-site

Get the most out of digital meeting tools

Hold people accountable without hounding or micromanaging

Keep the momentum going with prompt meeting follow-up

Contents

Preface: The Condensed Guide to Running Meetings

The 5-minute version of everything you need to know.

BY AMY GALLO

SECTION ONE. Prepare

1.Do You Really Need to Hold That Meeting?

A simple tool to help you decide.

BY ELIZABETH GRACE SAUNDERS

2.Stop Calling Every Conversation a Meeting

We need a more effective vocabulary.

BY AL PITTAMPALLI

3.If You Can’t Say What Your Meeting Will Accomplish, You Shouldn’t Have It

Set a purpose by answering two questions.

BY BOB FRISCH AND CARY GREENE

4.How to Design an Agenda for an Effective Meeting

A productive meeting begins here.

BY ROGER SCHWARZ

5.The Key to Shorter, Better Meetings

A filter to help you articulate your purpose.

BY ANTHONY TJAN

6.The 50-Minute Meeting

Build in time for transition.

BY DAVID SILVERMAN

7.The Magic of 30-Minute Meetings

Give yourself less time, and you’ll get more done.

BY PETER BREGMAN

8.Meetings Need a Shot Clock

Tackle your agenda by beating the buzzer.

BY BOB FRISCH AND CARY GREENE

9.Are There Too Many People in Your Meeting?

Probably. A rule of thumb.

SECTION TWO. Conduct

10.Before a Meeting, Tell Your Team That Silence Denotes Agreement

Speak now or forever hold your peace.

BY BOB FRISCH AND CARY GREENE

11.Establish Ground Rules

Set expectations for participation.

12.Reach Group Decisions During Meetings

You have options for gathering input and moving forward.

13.The Right Way to Cut People Off in Meetings

Jellyfish!

BY BOB FRISCH AND CARY GREENE

14.Dealing with People Who Derail Meetings

Having an explicit purpose will get you back on track.

BY ROGER SCHWARZ

15.Refocus a Meeting After Someone Interrupts

Listen, validate, and redirect.

BY REBECCA KNIGHT

SECTION THREE Participate

16.Polite Ways to Decline a Meeting Invitation

Preserve your time—and the relationship.

BY LIANE DAVEY

17.How to Interject in a Meeting

Useful phrases to introduce ideas, disagree, and express confusion.

BY JODI GLICKMAN

18.Stuck in a Meeting from Hell? Here’s What to Do

Don’t just sit there and suffer.

BY MELISSA RAFFONI

19.7 Ways to Stop a Meeting from Dragging On

Break free from the silent majority.

BY JOSEPH GRENNY

20.When Your Boss Is Terrible at Leading Meetings

Three tactics for turning things around.

BY PAUL AXTELL

SECTION FOUR. Close and Follow Up

21.The Right Way to End a Meeting

With closure.

BY PAUL AXTELL

22.Don’t End a Meeting Without Doing These 3 Things

Make sure everyone’s on the same page.

BY BOB FRISCH AND CARY GREENE

SECTION FIVE. Specific Types of Meetings

23.What Everyone Should Know About Running Virtual Meetings

Just three things.

BY PAUL AXTELL

24.How to Run a Great Virtual Meeting

Rules matter more.

BY KEITH FERRAZZI

25.Conduct a Meeting of People from Different Cultures

Help them step outside their comfort zones.

BY REBECCA KNIGHT

26.Making Global Meetings Work

Inconvenience everybody equally.

BY JUNE DELANO

27.Give Your Standing Meetings a Makeover

Do away with the same old, same old.

BY MARTHA CRAUMER

28.How to Do Walking Meetings Right

Boost your creative thinking and engagement.

BY RUSSELL CLAYTON, CHRISTOPHER THOMAS, AND JACK SMOTHERS

29.Stand-Up Meetings Don’t Work for Everybody

Are they speedy, or sexist, ageist, and height-ist?

BY BOB FRISCH

30.Leadership Summits That Work

Stop putting your top people to sleep.

BY BOB FRISCH AND CARY GREENE

Appendix A: Meeting Preparation Checklist

Appendix B: Sample Agendas

Appendix C: Meeting Follow-Up Checklist

Appendix D: Sample Follow-Up Memo

Appendix E: Digital Tools to Make Your Next Meeting More Productive

There’s an app for that.

BY ALEXANDRA SAMUEL

Index

PREFACE

The Condensed Guide to Running Meetings

by Amy Gallo

Editor’s note: Here’s where to start if you need to organize a meeting soon—and you don’t have a ton of time to prepare, but you want to do it right. When you’re not so pressed for time, take a look at the rest of the book, which expands on themes raised here.

We love to hate meetings. And with good reason—they clog up our days, making it hard to get work done in the gaps, and so many feel like a waste of time.

Paul Axtell, author of Meetings Matter: 8 Powerful Strategies for Remarkable Conversations, says that this is a major pain point for nearly every manager he works with. People are absolutely resigned, he says. They have given up on the hope that it could be different. Axtell and Francesca Gino, author of Sidetracked: Why Our Decisions Get Derailed, and How We Can Stick to the Plan and a professor at Harvard Business School, weigh in here on whether much of the conventional wisdom on meetings holds true.

Keep the meeting as small as possible. No more than seven people.

Though research does not point to a precise number that’s ideal, there is evidence to suggest that keeping the meeting small is beneficial, says Gino. For one thing, you’re better able to notice body language when there are fewer people. In a group of 20 or more, you can’t keep track of the subtle cues you need to pick up, says Axtell. And if you want people to have the opportunity to contribute, limit attendance. In Axtell’s experience, limiting it to four or five people is the only way to make sure every one has the chance to talk in a 60-minute meeting.

The challenge with large meetings isn’t just that everyone won’t have a chance to talk but that many of them won’t feel the need to. When many hands are available, people work less hard than they ought to, explains Gino. Social psychology research has shown that when people perform group tasks (such as brainstorming or discussing information in a meeting), they show a sizable decrease in individual effort from when they perform alone. This is known as social loafing and tends to get worse as the size of the group increases.

That’s not to say that your 20-person meeting is doomed for failure. You just need to plan more carefully. The degree of facilitation has to go up, says Axtell. You have to be more thoughtful about getting input from the group and reading people in the room. You need someone who is masterful at managing the conversation.

Ban devices.

Both experts agree this is a good idea, for two reasons. First, we know devices distract us. Gino points out that many people think they can multitask—finish an e-mail or read through their Twitter feed while listening to someone in a meeting. But research shows they really can’t. Recent neuroscience research makes the point quite clear on this issue. Multitasking is simply a mythical activity. We can do simple tasks like walking and talking at the same time, but the brain can’t handle multitasking, says Gino. In fact, studies show that a person who is attempting to multitask takes 50% longer to accomplish a task and makes up to 50% more mistakes.

And those who pick up their devices during meetings may well be the worst multitaskers. "The research finds that the more time people spend using multiple forms of media

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