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Transplant Nursing: Scope and Standards of Practice

Transplant Nursing: Scope and Standards of Practice

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Transplant Nursing: Scope and Standards of Practice

Length:
209 pages
1 hour
Publisher:
Released:
Feb 11, 2016
ISBN:
9781558106413
Format:
Book

Description

Transplant nursing is the delivery of specialized nursing care focused on protecting, promoting, and optimizing the health and abilities of both the transplant recipient and the living donor across the life span. Patient care includes prevention, detection, and treatment of illness and injury related to diseases treated by solid organ transplantation and to diseases that may result from living donation. Transplant nursing also addresses the prevention of further disease and the promotion of optimal health and well-being of organ recipients and donors.
ANA and the International Transplant Nurses Society convened a workgroup of transplant nurse experts from to update and expand the 2008 edition to accommodate ongoing and anticipated changes in their specialty and in health care. With input from numerous nurses, they developed this revised edition. It is a comprehensive delineation of the competent level of practice and professional performance common to and expected from transplant registered nurses in all practice levels and settings.
The publication’s scope of practice addresses what is expected of all transplant nurses, specifying the who, what, where, when, why, and how of their practice. This gives the context—the underlying assumptions, characteristics, environments and settings, education and training requirements, key issues and trends, and ethical and conceptual bases of transplant nursing—needed to understand and use the standards.
Those 16 standards, which offer a framework for evaluating practice outcomes and goals, are those by which all transplant nurses are held accountable for their practice. The set of specific competencies accompanying each standard serves as evidence of minimal compliance with that standard.
A foundational volume that is primarily for those directly involved with transplant nursing practice, education, and research, other nurses and allied healthcare providers, researchers, and scholars will find value in this content. It is also a resource for employers, insurers, lawyers, policy makers, regulators, and stakeholders involved in solid organ transplantation.
About ANA’s Specialty Nursing Standards
Since the late 1990s, ANA has partnered with other nursing organizations to establish a formal process for recognition of specialty areas of nursing practice. This includes the criteria for approving the specialty itself and the scope statement, and an acknowledgment by ANA of the standards of practice for that specialty. Because of the significant changes in the evolving nursing and healthcare environments, ANA’s approval of specialty nursing scope statements and its acknowledgment of specialty standards of practice remain valid for five years, starting from the publication date of the documents.
The standards in this publication are based on language from ANA’s Nursing: Scope and Standards of Practice, Second Edition, a helpful supplement to this specialty text, which in turn is of optimal use with two complementary ANA texts: Nursing’s Social Policy Statement and Guide to the Code of Ethics for Nurses. Together, these three books help guide nursing practice, thinking, and decision-making. The set is proving useful as a professional reference, classroom textbook, in-service training guide, and credentialing exam resource.
Publisher:
Released:
Feb 11, 2016
ISBN:
9781558106413
Format:
Book

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Transplant Nursing - American Nurses Association

The American Nurses Association (ANA) is the only full-service professional organization representing the interests of the nation’s 3.4 million registered nurses through its constituent member nurses associations and its organizational affiliates. ANA advances the nursing profession by fostering high standards of nursing practice, promoting the rights of nurses in the workplace, projecting a positive and realistic view of nursing, and lobbying the Congress and regulatory agencies on healthcare issues affecting nurses and the public.

The American Nurses Association (ANA) is a national professional association. This ANA publication, Transplant Nursing: Scope and Standards of Practice, Second Edition, reflects the thinking of the nursing profession on various issues and should be reviewed in conjunction with state board of nursing policies and practices. State law, rules, and regulations govern the practice of nursing, whereas Transplant Nursing: Scope and Standards of Practice, Second Edition, guides nurses in the application of their professional knowledge, skills, and responsibilities.

American Nurses Association

8515 Georgia Avenue, Suite 400

Silver Spring, MD 20910-3492

1-800-274-4ANA

http://www.Nursingworld.org

Cataloging-in-Publication Data available at the Library of Congress.

Copyright ©2016 American Nurses Association and International Transplant Nurses Society. All rights reserved. Reproduction or transmission in any form is not permitted without written permission of the American Nurses Association (ANA). This publication may not be translated without written permission of ANA. For inquiries, or to report unauthorized use, email copyright@ana.org.

ISBN-13: 978-1-55810-639-0     SAN: 851-3481     01/2016

First printing: January 2016

Contents

Contributors

Overview of Content

Function of the Scope of Practice Statement

Function of Standards

Audience for This Publication

Scope of Transplant Nursing Practice

Introduction to Transplant Nursing

International Transplant Nurses Society and Transplant Nursing Practice

The Growth of Transplant Nursing Practice

What Is Transplant Nursing?

Key Elements of Transplant Nursing

Practice Settings and Roles: The Where, When, and Who

Practice Characteristics: The How and Why of Transplant Nursing

Clinical Transplant Nurse/Transplant Nurse Generalist

Transplant Nurse Coordinator

Advanced Practice Registered Nurse Specializing in Transplantation

Societal and Ethical Dimensions Describe the How and Why of Transplant Nursing

A Unique Base of Knowledge and Set of Skills

Globalization of Transplant Nursing

Palliative Care and Transplant Nursing

Ethics and Informed Decisions

Future Considerations

Standards of Transplant Nursing Practice

Function of Standards

Standards of Practice for Transplant Nursing

Standard 1. Assessment

Standard 2. Diagnosis

Standard 3. Outcomes Identification

Standard 4. Planning

Standard 5. Implementation

Standard 5A. Coordination of Care

Standard 5B. Health Teaching and Health Promotion

Standard 5C. Consultation

Standard 5D. Prescriptive Authority and Treatment

Standard 6. Evaluation

Standards of Professional Performance for Transplant Nursing

Standard 7. Ethics

Standard 8. Education

Standard 9. Evidence-Based Practice and Research

Standard 10. Quality of Practice

Standard 11. Communication

Standard 12. Leadership

Standard 13. Collaboration

Standard 14. Professional Practice Evaluation

Standard 15. Resource Utilization

Standard 16. Environmental Health

Glossary

References and Bibliography

Appendix A. Transplant Nursing: Scope and Standards of Practice (2009)

Index

Contributors

Transplant Nursing: Scope and Standards of Practice, Second Edition, is the product of significant thought work by many registered nurses and a three-step review process. This document originated from decisions garnered during a significant number of telephone conference calls and electronic mail communications among the diverse workgroup members and was followed by a 30-day public comment period and consultation with the American Nurses Association (ANA) staff. The ANA review process included evaluation by the Committee on Nursing Practice Standards and final review and approval by the ANA Board of Directors.

Transplant Nursing Scope and Standards Workgroup, 2014–2015

Donna Hathaway, PhD, RN, FAAN – Workgroup Chair

Distinguished Professor

University of Tennessee Health Science Center

Memphis, Tennessee, USA

Ann Herbage Busch, MS, RN, CWOCN, ACNS-BD-PP, FAAN

Liver Transplant Clinical Nurse Specialist

VA Portland Health Care System

Portland, Oregon, USA

Anne Floden, PhD, RN, CETC, TPMC

Senior Lecturer, School of Health Sciences

Jonkoping University

Jonkoping, Sweden

Beverly Kosmach-Park, DNP, RN, FAAN

Clinical Nurse Specialist

Department of Transplant Surgery

Children’s Hospital of Pittsburgh

Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, USA

Catherine Pantik, BA, BSN, PhD(c)

Nurse Manager

Nephrology Services Medical Group

Graduate Student, University of TN HSC

Memphis, Tennessee, USA

Tammy Sebers, RN, BSN, CNN

Clinical Nurse Manager

Oregon Health and Science University

Portland, Oregon, USA

Laura A. Taylor, PhD, RN, ANEF

Associate Professor

Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences

Bethesda, Maryland, USA

Claire West, Master of Nursing

Liver Transplant Coordinator

Royal Prince Alfred Hospital

Sydney, Australia

ANA Committee on Nursing Practice Standards

Richard Henker, PhD, RN, CRNA, FAAN – Co-chair (03/2014–12/2015)

Tresha (Terry) L. Lucas, MSN, RN – Co-chair (07/2011–12/2014)

Danette Culver, MSN, APRN, ACNS-BC, CCRN

Deborah Finnell, DNS, PMHNP-BC, CARN-AP, FAAN

Renee Gecsedi, MS, RN

Deedra Harrington, DNP, MSN, APRN, ACNP-BC

Maria Jurlano, MS, BSN, RN, NEA-BC, CCRN

Carla A. B. Lee, PhD, APRN-BC, CNAA, FAAN, FIBA

Verna Sitzer, PhD, RN, CNS

American Nurses Association Staff

Carol J. Bickford, PhD, RN-BC, CPHIMS, FAAN – Content editor

Eric Wurzbacher – Project editor

Yvonne Humes, MSA – Project coordinator

Maureen Cones, JD – Legal counsel

About the International Transplant Nurses Society

The International Transplant Nurses Society (ITNS) is a non-profit organization committed to promoting the education and clinical practice excellence of nurses worldwide who are interested and participate in the care of solid organ transplant patients. Founded in 1992, ITNS offers nurses a forum for sharing and learning about the latest advances in transplantation and transplant patient care with national and international peers. It provides, promotes, and supports educational and professional growth opportunities, interprofessional networking and collaborative activities, and research in transplant clinical nursing.

About the American Nurses Association

The American Nurses Association (ANA) is the only full-service professional organization representing the interests of the nation’s 3.4 million registered nurses through its constituent member nurses associations and its organizational affiliates. ANA advances the nursing profession by fostering high standards of nursing practice, promoting the rights of nurses in the workplace, projecting a positive and realistic view of nursing, and lobbying the Congress and regulatory agencies on healthcare issues affecting nurses and the public.

Overview of Content

This document addresses the role, scope, and standards of nursing practice for the specialty of transplant nursing. The scope of practice addresses the definition of transplant nursing, its various levels of practice based on educational preparation recognizing its worldwide variations, current clinical practice activities and sites, and current evidence-based practice relevant to transplant nursing. The standards of transplant nursing practice are objective, measurable statements of the responsibilities for which all transplant nurses are accountable.

Function of the Scope of Practice Statement

The scope of practice statement (pages 3–32) describes the who, what, where, when, why, and how of this specialty nursing practice. Each of these questions should be sufficiently answered to provide a complete picture of the practice, its boundaries, and membership. The depth and breadth in which an individual registered nurse engages in the total scope of nursing practice are dependent upon that individual’s education, experience, role, and the population being served.

Function of Standards

The Standards are composed of Standards of Practice (pages 35–54) and

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