Flight To Everywhere [With Illustrations] Vol. I by Ivan Dmitri by Ivan Dmitri - Read Online

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Flight To Everywhere [With Illustrations] Vol. I - Ivan Dmitri

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Text originally published in 1944 under the same title.

© Valmy Publishing 2017, all rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system or transmitted by any means, electrical, mechanical or otherwise without the written permission of the copyright holder.

Publisher’s Note

Although in most cases we have retained the Author’s original spelling and grammar to authentically reproduce the work of the Author and the original intent of such material, some additional notes and clarifications have been added for the modern reader’s benefit.

We have also made every effort to include all maps and illustrations of the original edition the limitations of formatting do not allow of including larger maps, we will upload as many of these maps as possible.

FLIGHT TO EVERYWHERE

BY

IVAN DMITRI

Volume I

TABLE OF CONTENTS

Contents

TABLE OF CONTENTS 7

DEDICATION 8

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS 9

INTRODUCTION 10

FLIGHT TO EVERYWHERE 11

NATAL, BRAZIL 20

ASCENSION ISLAND 42

THE GOLD COAST 55

MAIDUGURI, NIGERIA 74

KHARTOUM 82

ARABIA 97

KARACHI, INDIA 102

AGRA, INDIA 110

ASSAM, INDIA 127

REQUEST FROM THE PUBLISHER 197

DEDICATION

I wish to dedicate this book to our men in the U.S. Armed Services. And though a separate volume for each man would be required to tell his full part in the war, I hope this will serve as a kind of diary recording for the men themselves suck deeds as they accomplished and such activities as went on around them. Lord knows, they were far too busy or tired to do it for themselves. It is a small offering, awkward and unmasterful in its execution, but it has wonderful subject matter—heroes and the deeds of heroes. I wish I were more capable of doing it justice.

IVAN DMITRI

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

The author wishes to express his deep appreciation and gratitude for the generous help in the preparation of this book to the officers and men of the Army Air Transport Command, Maj.-Gen. Harold L. George, Commanding; to Maj.-Gen. C. R. Smith, Brig.-Gen. Edward H. Alexander, Brig.-Gen. Earl S. Hoag, Lt.-Col. John C. Henry, and Maj. Irving Lashe; to Col. Curtis Mitchell and Maj. John T. Parker of the U.S. Army Bureau of Public Relations; to Col. Rex Smith; to Joseph W. G. Clark, Director in Chief, Public Relations Armed Forces of Canada; to Chairman T. M. Girdler and President Harry Wood head of Consolidated Vultee Aircraft Corporation; to John W. Hill of Hill and Knowlton; to James S. Thompson, President of McGraw-Hill Book Company, Inc.; to Ben Hibbs, Editor of the Saturday Evening Post, in which magazine a few of the pictures in this book have appeared; to Edwin F. Dakin, Editor of Plane Talk; to A. D. Rathbone IV; to Howard Stephenson; to Alexander Gardiner, Editor of American Legion magazine; to Clifford Stark, Editor of En Guardia magazine; to Nelson Rockefeller, Coordinator of Inter-American Affairs; to Ralph M. Beckwith; to Louis Dejonge; to Philip Ahrenhold; to Edward L. Smith; to Hy Needleman; and to Joseph F. Kalabza.

INTRODUCTION

I am glad that Ivan Dmitri has focused his famous lenses on some of the far flung operations of the Air Transport Command, Army Air Forces. This command deserves an enduring place in the annals of this war. Its accomplishments have been vitally instrumental in making our Air Forces’ operations triumphantly possible. This is also an important record of the air fighting forces in the Mediterranean, Near East and Far East areas. The story and pictures are a valuable contribution to the understanding of America’s heroic air accomplishments.

H. H. ARNOLD

General, U.S. Army

COMMANDING GENERAL, ARMY AIR FORCES

FLIGHT TO EVERYWHERE

AT 5:30 ON A JUNE MORNING, twenty-eight fellow passengers and I, all in Army uniform, boarded an Air Transport Command plane at Miami airport, bound for war zones. If there was uneasiness in their midst, they were not revealing it. When I mention that one or two qualms journeyed with us, I speak only of my own. Although German submarines were still prowling the Atlantic, I felt perfectly safe, knowing I would be far above them. And although I was heading for war sectors, my story and pictures would deal with behind-the-scenes activities and I expected no first-hand encounter with the enemy. So it was unreasonable, perhaps, that I should entertain even the slightest apprehension. Nevertheless, I was nervous, and more in an attempt to dispel my anxiety than anything else, I centered my interest on my traveling companions.

They were a perplexed lot of men for the most part, having no inkling of their destination. Instrument men, meteorologists, communications men, mechanics, and other technicians formed the group. Each had received intensive Army training in his specialty and now was on his way to dispose it, but not one man knew where.

That he was part of the extremely secret Project X had been told to take clothing suitable for both arctic and tropical climates, and now held seated orders to remain unread until after take-off, only served to heighten each man’s curiosity.

Their earnest and justifiable wonderment tempered my own uncertainties; at least I knew where I was going, as well as what I was going to do. Before take-off seemed as good a time as any to go to the flight deck and make arrangements for future picture taking.

Clambering over equipment, musette bags, and other luggage, as well as one or two men reclining on the floor, I made my way forward, while the four engines of the plane continued to snarl and growl like a dog being held from a fight.

Capt. Charles Fredericks was at the controls. Co-pilot R. J. Major standing by, and Engineer A. D. Duncan at the gas throttle. I liked them instantly. I have a bad habit that asserts itself whenever I am about to venture oil a special assignment of any distance. I go forward just as I was then doing, meet the crew, and decide whether they are brash and reckless or restrained and calm. Then I return to my place to fret and stew in the first eventuality, or to relax and enjoy myself in the second. It is a futile test, proving nothing. Almost everyone has seen men outwardly calm and seasoned go to shivers during an emergency, while those untried take over without fuss.