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Leo: A Ghost Story

Leo: A Ghost Story

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Leo: A Ghost Story

ratings:
4/5 (42 ratings)
Length:
32 pages
7 minutes
Released:
Aug 25, 2015
ISBN:
9781452139555
Format:
Book

Description

You would like being friends with Leo. He likes to draw, he makes delicious snacks, and most people can't even see him. Because Leo is also a ghost. When a new family moves into his home and Leo's efforts to welcome them are misunderstood, Leo decides it is time to leave and see the world. That is how he meets Jane, a kid with a tremendous imagination and an open position for a worthy knight. That is how Leo and Jane become friends. And that is when their adventures begin. This charming tale of friendship—from two of the best young minds in picture books: the author of the Caldecott Honor–winning Extra Yarn and the illustrator of the Bologna Ragazzi Award–winning Josephine—is destined to become a modern classic that will delight readers for years to come.
Released:
Aug 25, 2015
ISBN:
9781452139555
Format:
Book

About the author

Mac Barnett is a New York Times bestselling author whose books have been translated into more than thirty languages. His picture books include two Caldecott Honor–winning collaborations with Jon Klassen: Sam & Dave Dig a Hole and Extra Yarn. Among his other popular books are I Love You Like a Pig, illustrated by Greg Pizzoli, and The Magic Word, illustrated by Elise Parsley. He lives in Oakland, California. You can visit him online at www.macbarnett.com.


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Reviews

What people think about Leo

4.0
42 ratings / 4 Reviews
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Reader reviews

  • (5/5)
    Read on November 22, 2015I read this one aloud to myself (Jesse was watching football, Evie was playing with her birthday presents). Cute illustrations (loved how Leo was a simple blue outline), wonderful blue palette, and a lovely little friendship at the end.
  • (4/5)
    Not sure who would like this book.
  • (3/5)
    Leo the ghost lived a life of quiet solitude in an abandoned house on the edge of the city, until the day a new family moved in. Hoping to ingratiate himself with these new housemates, Leo prepared them mint tea and honey toast, only to unintentionally terrify them with his actions. Leaving his long-time home, Leo becomes a wandering ghost, searching for something - for some sort of connection. Meeting a young girl named Jane on a sidewalk, Leo finds a companion, one who can see him, but who mistakes him for an imaginary friend. Delighted to have finally found a friend, Leo is torn - should he tell Jane that he is not what she thinks, and risk losing her? When a house-breaker targets Jane's house, Leo finds the decision has been made for him...An engaging picture-book from author Mac Barnett, whose many amusing tales include Billy Twitters and His Blue Whale Problem and Oh No!: Or How My Science Project Destroyed the World, and illustrator Christian Robinson, who just won a Caldecott Honor this past month for Last Stop on Market Street, Leo: A Ghost Story explores the themes of loneliness, friendship and honesty. I read it together with two other titles featuring imaginary friends - The Adventures of Beekle: The Unimaginary Friend and Imaginary Fred - and was struck by the fact that all three books address the longing for connection, in their diverse ways. Perhaps imaginary friends make a good story-telling vehicle for such explorations? In any case, this was a sweet tale made all the better by Robinson's illustrations, done in acrylic paint and cut-out paper, in varying shades of blue, brown and black. I appreciated the fact that Jane is a dark-skinned young girl - too many of the more diverse picture-books out there are message-driven, and not enough are fanciful - but that this is not a narrative (or artistic) focus. It emphasizes that African-Americn children (that all kinds of children) lead rich imaginative lives, without drawing undue attention to the lesson. Recommended to young readers who enjoy (gentle) ghost-stories, and tales of imaginative play.
  • (3/5)
    Adorable tale. When we jump to conclusions about others, we could be the ones missing out on someone special; just like the first family did in this book. It took a special girl to not only see Leo, but to embrace exactly who he was, even when he was afraid to do so. I really enjoyed this one!