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The Collected Novels Volume One: Her Victory, The Widower’s Son, and Travels in Nihilon

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1,710 pages23 hours

Summary

These memorable novels show the range of the bestselling author of The Loneliness of the Long-Distance Runner, “one of the best English writers” (The New York Times).
 
British novelist Alan Sillitoe “powerfully depicted revolt against authority by the young and working class” in his best-known works of fiction (The Washington Post). Both The Loneliness of the Long-Distance Runner and Saturday Night and Sunday Morning were international bestsellers and made into acclaimed films. The prolific, award-winning author wrote over fifty books, including the three novels collected in this volume: a hard-won love story, a father-son tale of love and war, and a dystopian satire.
 
Her Victory: Finally leaving her brutish husband, Pam flees to London, where she takes refuge in a lonely, sparsely furnished room. With a twist of the wrist, she turns on the gas and resigns herself to death, only to be saved by a neighbor, Tom, a former sailor in the Merchant Navy, who carries scars of his own. Both fighting despair, these two unlikely lovers attempt to begin a new life together and find a reason to go on.
 
“Engrossing . . . Interesting and affecting.” —The New York Times
 
The Widower’s Son: Leaving the coal mines for the army, Charlie Scorton never looked back. After his wife died, the career military man raised his son to be a soldier as well. Like his father, William finds a home in the army, performing heroically at Dunkirk. But soon he will be forced to answer the question his father never could: What does a soldier do when war is over?
 
“Earnest, tenacious . . . Sillitoe retains his commendable honesty.” —Kirkus Reviews
 
Travels in Nihilon: In Sillitoe’s biting satirical novel, Nihilon is a country where honesty is outlawed, drunk driving is mandatory, and nihilism reigns supreme. Five researchers are sent into the midst of this chaos to compile a new guidebook about the peculiar, unexplored land and its all-powerful leader, President Nil. They arrive as tourists, but they’ll soon find out it’s a lot easier to enter Nihilon than it is to escape.
 
“Diabolically witty.” —The New York Times

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