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The Lost Tools of Learning: Symposium on Education

The Lost Tools of Learning: Symposium on Education

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The Lost Tools of Learning: Symposium on Education

ratings:
5/5 (2 ratings)
Length:
39 pages
31 minutes
Released:
May 23, 2018
ISBN:
9788828327585
Format:
Book

Description

That I, whose experience of teaching is extremely limited, should presume to discuss education is a matter, surely, that calls for no apology. It is a kind of behavior to which the present climate of opinion is wholly favorable. Bishops air their opinions about economics; biologists, about metaphysics; inorganic chemists, about theology; the most irrelevant people are appointed to highly technical ministries; and plain, blunt men write to the papers to say that Epstein and Picasso do not know how to draw. Up to a certain point, and provided that the criticisms are made with a reasonable modesty, these activities are commendable. Too much specialization is not a good thing. There is also one excellent reason why the veriest amateur may feel entitled to have an opinion about education. For if we are not all professional teachers, we have all, at some time or other, been taught. Even if we learnt nothing, perhaps in particular if we learnt nothing, our contribution to the discussion may have a potential value.
Released:
May 23, 2018
ISBN:
9788828327585
Format:
Book

About the author

Dorothy L. Sayers, the greatest of the golden age detective novelists, was born in Oxford in 1893. Her aristocratic detective, Lord Peter Wimsey, became one of the most popular fictional heroes of the twentieth century. She devoted the last 20 years of her life to playwriting, Christian scholarship, and a new translation of Dante. She died in 1957.


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The Lost Tools of Learning - Dorothy L. Sayers

The Lost Tools of Learning

Symposium on Education

by

Dorothy L. Sayers

© 2017 CrossReach Publications,

Waterford, Ireland

Copyright, A. Watkins, 1947, for the estate of Dorothy Sayers.

Originally published in The Hibbert Journal.

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Contents

THE LOST TOOLS OF LEARNING

Disquieting Questions

The Art of Learning

The Medieval Syllabus

Angels on a Needle

Unarmed

The Three Ages

The Use of Memory

The Mistress Science

Relation to Dialectic

The World Around Us

Pert Age-Criticism

The Imagination

The Study of Rhetoric

The University at Sixteen?

Educational Capital Depleted

Forgotten Roots

The Lost Tools of Learning

Symposium on Education

That I, whose experience of teaching is extremely limited, should presume to discuss education is a matter, surely, that calls for no apology. It is a kind of behavior to which the present climate of opinion is wholly favorable. Bishops air their opinions about economics; biologists, about metaphysics; inorganic chemists, about theology; the most irrelevant people are appointed to highly technical ministries; and plain, blunt men write to the papers to say that Epstein and Picasso do not know how to draw. Up to a certain point, and provided that the criticisms are made with a reasonable modesty, these activities are commendable. Too much specialization is not a good thing. There is also one excellent reason why the veriest amateur may feel entitled to have an opinion about education. For if we are not all professional teachers, we have all, at some time or other, been taught. Even if we learnt nothing, perhaps in particular if we learnt nothing, our contribution to the discussion may have a

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