Find your next favorite book

Become a member today and read free for 30 days
How May I Serve

How May I Serve

Read preview

How May I Serve

ratings:
3.5/5 (121 ratings)
Length:
191 pages
3 hours
Publisher:
Released:
Jun 17, 2014
ISBN:
9781452515243
Format:
Book

Description

How May I Serve is a guide to empower women who are struggling to find a way out of their troubles. I have tortured and abused myself for many years trying to find love, happiness, and peace of mindyet, the more I sought these things, the more they eluded me.

Then, I realized that it was an inside job. I had to learn to love myself, forgive myself, and make peace with myself. So many women have been brought up with limiting beliefs about themselves from childhood. From the time I was conceived, I was an unwanted pregnancy.

From the deep recesses of my subconscious mind, I programmed a tape of being unloved and unlovable. I acted and attracted circumstance after circumstance to validate this belief. I played the victim role very well. I did not know how to get out of my own way. The more I avoided looking at the cause of the problems, however, the worse they got.

I hit my bottom upon finding out that my oldest daughter had a heroin addiction. This brought everything full circle. In order to save her, I had to change myself.
Publisher:
Released:
Jun 17, 2014
ISBN:
9781452515243
Format:
Book

About the author

The author has traveled extensively around the world to find her purpose in life. She has learned and discovered that the answers were inside her all along. If she stays present in the moment, serves others, and learns from her failures, the answers will reveal themselves. Karen is an empowerment coach, teaching people the laws of the natural world. She also practices reflexology, teaches Nia dance, gardens, and loves to take long walks. She also still travels the world. The greatest significance she can offer humanity is to serve and give her best—to shed light and give value to the world gives her great joy.


Related to How May I Serve

Related Books


Inside the book

Top quotes

  • Everything is cre- ated twice, once in the mind and then in physical form. We must think it before it can be manifested.

  • Every child needs to hear this. Every child needs to know that they are “God seed,” that they have the ability to do, be, or have anything they desire if they reach to their fullest potential.

  • We should all practice short-term memory loss; there would be a lot less hostility in our world.

  • The appearance of the prostitute archetype does not necessarily mean we are giving our bodies away, for money or other things we want. It could mean we are in a dead-end relationship or a job we do not like in exchange for comfort, safety, or a salary.

  • I was looking in all the wrong places to find that peace. I never bothered to look within. I wasn’t aware that peace of mind comes through discipline and quieting of the mind. My mind then was like a huge ball of twisted wire.

Book Preview

How May I Serve - Karen Mathews

EPILOGUE

CHAPTER 1

E very morning, right after waking up, I would ask God, How may I serve? How may I be of service to my highest good?

And every night, just before I went to sleep, again I would ask God for guidance: How may I be of service? How may I serve to my highest calling?

I just never thought God would take me literally. I asked to be of service … and now I am a server again. A waitress? Really?

Now I am serving many people, all day; however, I am not so sure that this is my highest calling. I have so much to give; so much I desire to offer. I have so much knowledge, wisdom, inspiration, and motivation that I want to bring forth. I feel like I am trapped between two worlds, one being a light worker—someone who is helping to heal the planet and is ready, willing, and able to assist in transmuting the world to a higher frequency—and the other in this dense, dark, old carbon-based world, dragging me down back into my reptilian brain.

I get up at 4:20 each morning. I feed my four cats, wash, get dressed, meditate for fifteen minutes, and then walk my cute little ten-pound, long-haired Chihuahua. I give him a treat, make my bed, and off I go at 5:30AM to work. I live on Long Island, and it takes me about twenty minutes to get to work.

I start my shift at 6:00AM and always get there a bit early. I like my habits. I like being punctual, and I like being organized. I have learned, and still believe, that being late is a sign of disrespect. My shift is from 6:00 in the morning to 3:00 in the afternoon, Thursday through Monday. My weekends are Tuesdays and Wednesdays. My work shifts are long, with most of the time being spent on my feet.

I am a morning person, so I really enjoy this time of day the most. It is quiet and magical. I can think of many other things I could do with my mornings rather than head off to the Mystic Luncheonette, but this is where I am called to be at the moment. This is where I am serving and giving what is needed of me to raise the consciousness of people’s lives as well as my own. This is my ministry for now. There are lessons to be learned here too.

I do sometimes get to spread my light-working wings, but so much of my passion is sucked from me by the energy vampires who only want their eggs cooked just right and their toast dry.

Yuck! I don’t sound very spiritual, do I?

Being a waitress is truly a study in psychology. Anyone who wants to go into psychology needs to be a server to some degree. You really get a full spectrum of human behavior when you serve food to people. To be a good server, you need to have people skills, ask lots of questions, be quick on your feet, be able to multitask, have a good memory, balance well, and smile at all times.

Food is such an emotional issue for so many people, and at a luncheonette in a small community, you get to see a lot of the same people day in and day out. They sit at the same table, (if it is available). They order the same thing day after day, only switching it up on weekends, and they like to be served in the same way, by the same server. We are all creatures of habit.

The Mystic Luncheonette on Long Island, New York has quite the history. It has been around since 1932, so you can just imagine the array of people who have passed through these doors. I believe places hold energy. When you walk into a beautiful church or any house of worship, you can feel the calm, peaceful aura in the space it holds. The Mystic Luncheonette also is holding the energy of all the people who have come and gone before. It is very active and highly unpredictable.

Working here as a server, I sometimes feel that I am also locked into a paradigm that is in desperate need of change. I see the world, our Earth, crying out for help. I see people manifesting disease in their bodies and minds, rather than ease and peace. How can I serve better? How can I be of help? How can I use my skills and talents to wake them up from the nightmare they are in?

Before working at the luncheonette, I had a successful horticulture business for twenty-three years. I worked for the crème de la crème of clients. I have a degree in natural health. I am a certified reflexologist and life coach. I developed an aromatherapy body spray, made to balance your chakras, called Hygiea, after the goddess of health. That is where we get the word hygiene, and where all health began. I am a biodynamic gardener and an amazing dancer. I studied with the best teachers in the world in personal development and spent tens of thousands of dollars on my education. I have traveled the world and experienced more than most people do in a lifetime.

So being a waitress really threw me for a loop. I don’t believe in accidents, so I know I am here for a reason and that there is purpose lurking here somewhere. The key is to discover this reason.

I want to scream from the rooftops that it is time to think differently, to live differently. But sadly, no one hears me; no one is interested.

Oh, yes, there are a few lonely souls like me out there with whom I can converse, but most people just want their pancakes, french toast, eggs, and burgers. They want comfort, routine, and habits. They don’t want change, and they certainly don’t want to shake their lives up; unless, of course, it comes in chocolate.

I love people, and I love to help and teach the laws of nature and of the universe. I am fascinated by metaphysical phenomena, healing, energy, consciousness, nature, the mind, and the capacity we have to explore the infinite possibilities that we can tap into when we make the quantum shifts within ourselves, those minute changes that will alter our lives in a big way.

Is that how I am here being a server again? Is that why I wound up at the Mystic Luncheonette, waitressing at fifty-six years young?

Let’s see. Let’s go back in time … way, way back, before I was even a twinkle in my parents’ eyes, to discover how I ended up here, shall we?

CHAPTER 2

B oth of my parents were from Germany. My father was born in Berlin in 1926 to extremely wealthy Jewish parents. My mother was born in Munich in 1929 to a lower-income but educated family. Her mom was Catholic and her father was Jewish. They never married because of this. There was already unrest in Germany at this time, and marriage was not advisable. So Mom was an illegitimate child, which was also frowned upon. Neither of my parents had siblings, so I have no aunts, uncles, or cousins. My dad’s life was full of nannies, servants, expensive clothing, Rolls-Royce automobiles, and all the other finer things in life. From the stories I am told, his dad was the jovial one. I was told my grandfather spent more time with my dad than my grandmother did, and from the pictures that I still have, you can see that this was the case.

I never saw pictures of my grandmother with my father; only my grandfather and the nannies are posed with him. I never did get to meet my grandfather, so I have to recount all of this only from the stories that were told to me. He was a womanizer and loved playing the horses. This did not sit well with his wife, my grandmother. She was very proper and snooty. They had friends in all the right places (including some high Nazi officials) and connections to get what they needed and wanted. My grandmother, whom I did know, was a real bitch, I’m sorry to say. She was very cold. (I know that doesn’t sound too spiritual, but hey, who says being spiritual and having a potty-mouth can’t go hand-in-hand?) From the tales I was told, she was off skiing, gallivanting at parties, and doing what she wanted while my dad was left with the nannies and servants. Again, I have pictures that back up this scenario, so it must be at least somewhat close to the truth. It was their lifestyle, for a while at least.

Then the shit hit the fan. The war broke out. Chaos, unrest, hiding, bombs, and uncertainty all came to play in my parents’ lives. My dad had to see his father off on the trains, heading toward a concentration camp. I’m sure my dad wasn’t told his father was going there, but it was a cattle car, so it must have been awful. I can’t even fathom what my dad or my grandfather was experiencing and feeling.

I was told that my grandfather could have been spared. He might have been able to leave Germany, since they had connections with high officials; however, my grandmother did not want this to happen because of his flirtatious nature. She could have saved his life; instead she let him die. Horrible, simply horrible.

My dad was able to get out. He was sent to London, England, the only country accepting German-Jewish children. When he arrived, there were families ready to adopt children into their homes. They only wanted the very young children, though, since they felt that they would be easier to handle. My dad, being a bit older—around sixteen—was not taken in by any family, so he wound up living in several orphanages and working in factories. When I think of what he had to go through, my heart bleeds for him. What a sad story. My grandmother eventually paid her way out to London. Everything was taken from them by the Nazis. Their home, belongings, bank accounts—anything of value. To this day, all that I have from my grandmother is a diamond ring and some pictures that she was able to smuggle out. My grandfather, well, we found no record of him ever arriving at any concentration camp. So we had to assume he must have died on the train and they just threw him out. The whole story is just awful.

My mother lived in an apartment building in the center of Munich with her mom, and her grandparents, who lived nearby. She, being half Jewish, was considered just as bad as being fully Jewish. My mom always felt alone and unloved. My grandmother had her at a young age, and she never had the patience to care for her in a nurturing way. Besides, with everything that was going on in Germany at this time, my grandmother felt it difficult to express her feelings in a healthy way. It was a tough time for everyone, and my grandmother had a lot of suppressed anger, guilt, and shame—both about having a child out of wedlock and having conceived a child from a man who was Jewish. My grandfather was a Sephardic Jew, born in Amsterdam, Holland. He was a chemist and a gifted horticulturist. (I sometimes wonder if somehow his spirit surrounds me, since I have the same gift.) He loved people and loved to engage in conversation about philosophy, nature, and life. He did not live with my mom and grandmother, and I’m not sure how he got to Munich or how he met my grandmother. I do know that my mom had major abandonment issues due to the fact that she was an illegitimate child and half Jewish. Many things were kept hidden from her to protect her from the Nazis, which she didn’t understand. This caused her to develop phobias and insecurities that have remained with her to this day. As a child she was often in hiding from the third Reich since her birth certificate showed that she was half Jewish. This was tremendously stressful for her and my grandmother, who was trying to protect her from being taken away.

She was sent to school, but never wanted to go out of fear that something would happen to her mom and grandparents. Nothing and nowhere was safe. At home, there was always the chance of an unexpected interrogation by the Nazis. There were air raids and bomb attacks daily. Once, while at school, the air raids sounded off and all the children were told to go into the shelters at the school. My mom recounts that instead of hiding, she ran home, bombs going off all around her. She didn’t care; she just wanted to get home to her family. The next day, she told me that she saw the devastation all around, and that her school was gone. Her intuition must have been very powerful to have told her to run home instead of stay there. She would have been killed.

After the bombing at her school, my mom was sent to another school. My grandmother had studied dressmaking and so she pushed my mom to do the same. She has an amazing talent for it—she is very artistic. I still have some pieces of clothing in excellent condition that are so detailed that any designer would be envious of the workmanship that went into them. At this time, my grandfather was sent to a place in the country where he could hide and have protection from the Nazis. Unfortunately, he died of malnutrition and loneliness. They couldn’t get food to him and no one came to visit because it was too dangerous. I wish I’d been able to meet my grandfathers.

My maternal grandmother had one sister and three brothers. I was fortunate to have gotten to know my great aunt, Tante Annie (in German, Tante means aunt) and Onkel Oscar (in German, Onkel means uncle). Oscar was an engineer. I never did get to meet the two other brothers. Onkel Irving was studying to become a doctor and in order to complete his thesis, he had to go to the front lines in battle; it was there that he was killed by shrapnel. When my great grandmother received the news of his death, it killed her. She had a heart attack that she never recovered from.

Before her death, she was a brave woman during the war. I was told that she took many people into her house that were in hiding and couldn’t find work. They had a carpenter, a strip teaser, and many others, such as Gypsies and Jews who would have been sent off to concentration camps if it weren’t for my great grandmother. It really is amazing how one’s true character is revealed during times of crisis and stress. Looking back, I admire her strength, courage, and open heart, and I often feel her presence around me. I’m not too sure what happened to the other brother, Onkel Hans. He had a few children, I was told, but I never knew or had any contact with them. Between my father’s story of tragedy, and my mother’s story of despair, it really is a miracle they were able to find each other.

CHAPTER 3

T he war went on and on until one day it was over. The bloodshed stopped, the bombs were muted, the concentration camps were liberated, and the damage was done—which continues from generation to generation until we learn to live in peace with one another.

Now my parents were young adults. They should have been exploring their freedom and having fun. While things were better for them after the war; however, they both had deep psychological scars that would have lasting effects. My father, at this time, was working as a civilian for the American forces and was transferred to Hamburg, Germany. It was there that he met Francis Koch, a businessman who owned a few small women’s retail shops in Munich. They became very close friends and he asked my father if he would like to go to Munich with him. He did, and that is where he met my mother. Ah, so romantic. An after-war love story. They were both, by chance, invited to go out to dinner one evening. Sometimes you have to wonder about these chance meetings. I don’t believe in chance or

You've reached the end of this preview. Sign up to read more!
Page 1 of 1

Reviews

What people think about How May I Serve

3.5
121 ratings / 715 Reviews
What did you think?
Rating: 0 out of 5 stars

Reader reviews

  • (4/5)
    Good book. Some touching moments, but also a few things didn't mesh well for me, such as the main character saying he doesn't like books and then two or three chapters later, he is describing his favorite book. Other than a few things like that though, the story was great. A lot more interesting than one would think.
  • (5/5)
    Simply put, I loved this book. The characters were captivating. The story kept my interest until the very end, and -- unlike some readers -- I enjoyed the way Haddon masterfully created a narrative that brings readers into the mind of an autistic child.
  • (5/5)
    Really enjoyable. The narrative voice is unusual, but fascinatingly so.
  • (3/5)
    If run-on sentences and disconnected thoughts make you crazy in a book, you'll have to stick it out: this book is worth it. I had a hard time starting the book, and its setting is in Europe, which may explain the language (I warn people about that in case a child wants to read the book!). The story is told from the perspective of a high-functioning young man with Asperger's. It gave me a greater appreciation for people with Asperger's and those who care about them.
  • (5/5)
    I really enjoyed this book. Christopher was just too pure for the world, and I wanted to hug him, but he would have hated that. Christoper is an autistic boy who finds the neighbor's dog murdered. Initially he is blamed for it because he's found at the scene of the crime cradling the dog. Christopher is then determined to act as a detective like Sherlock Holmes and discover who killed poor Wellington the dog.This book is told in the first person, which usually makes me cringe and stop reading; however, it was so beautifully written that I feel as though I got a chance to see the thinking process of an autistic person first hand. It was very fascinating to see how his thought process worked; how he saw and interacted the world and the people around him.In the middle searching for the killer, Christopher uncovers an entirely different mystery regarding his family. His dad has been lying to him and throws his world into a tailspin.This book is funny and engaging and gives a small bit of insight into the life of a person with autism, and being the parent of a child with autism.
  • (4/5)
    This was a super quick read but was still an extreme page turner. Being narrated by a child with mental disabilities made it quite unique. The author showed his true talent by taking on this challenge. I really felt that I was inside the child's mind and truly feeling what he felt. This book gives the reader a whole new perspective on life and points on the thoughts, feelings, and experience we take for granted every day. It also brought into view how one may not understand that everyone we see is fighting their own battles. As I study mental health in school, this book was also a learning experience. I would definitely recommend it to anyone both in and out of the field.
  • (5/5)
    An unusual book. Similar to The Rosie Project. Offers a different look at the world and and how that different look alters your experience of the world. I like the maths parts of the book. Its a short book with short chapters and worth a read.
  • (4/5)
    The book is "written" from the perspective of a boy with Autism. It provided a good description of what it would be like to live with a type of Autism. I really enjoyed it and would recommend it. It doesn't take too long to read.
  • (4/5)
    I read this book in one sitting. Plot-wise it looked so simple at first, but as I read through there were so much more entanglements than I expected.

    Also- I love reading POVs of people who see the world differently. Christopher Boone's is no exception. :)
  • (3/5)
    Christoper is 15 years old and suffers from something similar to Asperger's Syndrom or Autism and he describes himself as "a mathematician with some behavioral difficulties". He is a fan of Sherlock Holmes and when a dog is killed in his neighbourhood he decides to investigate and solve the mystery of "Who killed Wellington?". It is told in first person by Christopher as he is writing a book of his investigation and the drama that occurs because of his investigation. This a very strange book and completely different than anything I have read before. I read it in one sitting and felt very drawn to Christopher, but I can't say that I would recommend this book. It definitely isn't for everyone.
  • (5/5)
    Christopher John Francis Boone knows all the countries of the world and their capitals and every prime number up to 7,057. He relates well to animals but has no understanding of human emotions. He cannot stand to be touched. And he detests the color yellow.This improbable story of Christopher's quest to investigate the suspicious death of a neighborhood dog makes for one of the most captivating, unusual, and widely heralded novels in recent years.I enjoyed this book very much. It was a first person point of view of happenings through the eyes of an autistic teenager. It is a very touching and fascinating portrayal and is a definite classic novel. I found Mark Haddon to be a very clever and observant writer and enjoyed his gentle humor. I look forward to reading another book by Haddon and I would highly recommend this book to those who like unique and different novels.
  • (4/5)
    I initially saw the stage performance that was adapted from this book. This was a selection for my book club and I thoroughly enjoyed it. It is a super fast read but really gives you tremendous insight of a young man Christopher who has autism. The author explores the family dynamics including trust, betrayal and the love of it's members. I really felt like it gave a true look at inside the mind of a person with autism. Certainly shed some light on the difficulties of living with this condition. Great read.
  • (4/5)
    Written from the perspective of an autistic 15 year old living in Swindon, England, the main character, Christopher sets out to investigate the murder of his neighbor's dog. However, this novel is about more than just solving a neighborhood crime. Mark Haddon weaves a complex tale about family, betrayal, trust, and courage, while allowing the reader into the mind of someone with autism.

    I thoroughly enjoyed the perspective from which this book was written, portraying the nuances of an autistic teenager, including his detachment from feelings and other humans, his need for structure and order and also his courage and struggle to step outside of himself to reach a goal. Having worked to a small degree with autistic children in the past, I felt that Mark Haddon was able to capture the essence of his main character and bring him to life.
  • (4/5)
    I didn't love it in the way that some others did, though that may have something to do with reading it in audiobook form, which the book doesn't lend itself to quite as well, yet it was still very compelling. The narrator is engaging, and it really kind of messes with the way your head works and lends a bit of insight as to how it feels to look at the world in a very different way than the people around you. Christopher is an unreliable narrator not because he's dishonest, as he's indeed honest to a fault, but because he really doesn't see or understand events around him the way most readers would. This makes for a very interesting and unusual, though somewhat predictable, narrative. It takes quite a bit of getting used to, but is a solid reading experience.
  • (5/5)
    The book opens in Swindon, England with an autistic young man, Christopher Boone, discovering a poodle that had been murdered with a fork (garden tool) stuck through it. Christopher finds himself getting arrested when he has trouble answering their questions and hit a police officer when the officer grabs him, as Christopher does not like to be touched. Due to his autism and the circumstances he is given a caution and told that this must never happen again or he would go to jail.Something else Christopher does not like is the colors yellow and brown. He does not like loud noises. He does like the color red and dyes yellow food red so he can eat it. He loves to count prime numbers and work math problems in his head especially to calm himself down. He plans on taking his maths A levels and physics A levels this year and go to a university someday. He lives with his dad and his mom died a year and a half ago or so.Christopher is a huge fan of Sherlock Holmes and decides to find out who killed the poodle, Wellington. His teacher at his special school, Siobhan, encourages him in this endeavor and having him write it down in a notebook. When his father finds out about it he tells him to stay out of other people's business. But Christopher takes people at their literal word and he does not know what to make of that, so he keeps going and goes around asking people in the neighboorhood questions. When his dad becomes more specific and tells him to stop investigating the Wellington death, Christopher has already got a suspect: Mr. Spears, the owner's ex-husband. So he decides to ask around about Mr. Spears since that's not asking about Wellington. He ends up finding out more about Mr. Spears than he expected.When his dad finds his notebook and reads what he has written he becomes quite angry and throws it away. When Christopher goes to look for it in the dustbin it isn't there so he searches the house and finds it in a box in his dad's room along with some letters from his mom written after her death. His dad has been lying to him about a lot of things and in Christopher's world, you don't lie. Christopher reacts recklessly to the new information that has come to light.Christopher is not an easy young man to take care of as a parent. The closest his parents get to a hug is touching his palm to theirs for a second. But he is easy to love. Christopher's detecting the death of a dog named Wellington will lead him down a path he could never imagine. Will he find out who killed Wellington? Will he be able to trust his father again? What will become of him and his rat Toby? This is an excellent read and a very accurate portrayal of someone with autism. The title comes from a Sherlock Holmes story where he solves the mystery because the dog does not bark in the nighttime because he knew the culprit. It fits in nicely with Christopher's love of Holmes and the mystery of the dog's death. I highly recommend this book.
  • (4/5)
    This novel has been included in the "1001 books you should read before you die list."Christopher Boone is a 15 year old adolescent who knows all the countries in the world, intelligent in math and physics, detests the color brown and yellow...and is autistic. While coming home from school, he discovers a neighbor's dog who has been killed with a garden fork. He decides to investigate the crime to determine the killer. After the killer is exposed, Christopher has a rift with his father, which spurs him on a quest from Swindon to London, a distance of 80 miles. This might seen an easy journey to make but it proves almost insurmountable when you don't like crowds and or being touched. The author's use of Christopher as the narrator opens for the reader the world of individuals with an autistic spectrum disorder and the challenges they encounter.
  • (5/5)
    This was a well written story told from the perspective of an autistic savant boy with an affinity for numbers.
  • (4/5)
    This book reads a junior high school level because the character is a 15yo kid with something like asperger's. It wasn't my normal kind of book, but it was a well written and interesting humanistic story.
  • (4/5)
    I really liked this book. I liked the way it was written and how I viewed the world after reading it.
  • (5/5)
    I really enjoyed this novel and felt for the parents in the story. Raising children is challenging, let alone raising a child with a disability. Very enlightening on the subject of autism. I learned a lot and the story made me sad, but I really liked it.
  • (3/5)
    Neat little one-trick pony, written in quick, precociously-stilted prose. But really man, if I wanted to spend hours and hours being talked at by an autistic kid, I'd just go back to High School.
  • (4/5)
    Unique and unforgettable.
  • (5/5)
    "The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-time" was funny, and informative, but also sad. This book is a murder mystery. The main character Chris is trying to solve the mystery of how his neighbor's dog, Wellington, died. Chris is autistic and since the book is written from his point of view, the reader can see what life is like from an autistic person's point of view. Chris is very good at math, especially prime numbers. When he is angry he adds up all the prime numbers he knows to calm himself down. He has very specific likes and dislikes about colors: "4 red cars in a row made it a good day, and 3 red cars in row made it a quite good day, and 5 red cars in row made it a super good day, and 4 yellow cars in a row made it a black day, which is a day when I don't speak to anyone and sit on my own reading books and don't eat my lunch and take no risks." During his investigation, Chris makes many troubling discoveries about his own life and about his parents. This story is really many stories in one. I think this is very clever and I liked that alot. I think the only thing that was a little disappointing was that the mystery was solved too early in the book, but other than that it was a great book.I would recommend this book to anyone who likes mysteries, puzzels, or math. I would also recommend this to people who are interested in learning more about autism. "The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time" is 226 pages long, which includes diagrams, drawings, and even a math problem at the end of the book!
  • (3/5)
    I'm not sure how to feel about this one. In brief, it's about 15-year-old Christopher Boone's attempts to discover who killed his neighbor's dog, and he learns some surprising things about his mother along the way. Though it's never mentioned explicitly, one assumes he has a form of autism. And while I've heard this book is supposed to be a real eye-opener and help people be more understanding of autistic people, I honestly developed far more sympathy for Christopher's parents. I don't know if I could handle taking care of someone like that. My hat's off to all the parents, teachers, and other caretakers who work with special needs kids every day. You are truly amazing people.
  • (4/5)
    This is a very moving story, told in first person by a young man struggling with Autism. It is his unique voice, as he tries to explain his behavior and thought processes through the challenges of everyday life, that make this story so powerful. The reader will gain new insight into the very complex life of a person with this condition. The premise of the story is a mystery really. A dog has been mysteriously killed and our narrator, Christopher, is the first to find him. Because of his often "strange" behavior, he is automatically suspected of the killing. Christopher makes it his personal mission to find who really killed Wellington, a poodle, with a garden fork. In spite of his father's demands that he not stick his nose in other people's business, Christopher finds his own ways to investigate the "murder." The search for the clues to who killed Wellington, also leads Christopher to find the answers to other important questions about his life. These answers provide him with a surprise he had never expected. This is a touching, interesting, eye-opening story of an young man's triumph over a condition that is debilitating and cruel and his determination to set things right in his world.
  • (4/5)
    Interesting story. Our narrator has Asperger's syndrome and the author did a good job of narration from this point of view. David is extremely gifted at math and logic, but devoid of emotion. You feel great sympathy for the parents.
  • (4/5)
    I found this book a little exhausting to read. The story is told from Christopher's very observant point of view. He is a 15-year-old autistic boy who enjoys math and the color red. I really enjoyed the unique point of view, but did find some parts difficult to get through. Near the end of the book, I felt like the story was dragging a little, but I was happy with the way it ended. Having worked with autistic children, I feel this book is a great way to get a glimpse into their thinking process.
  • (5/5)
    First of all, I love the way the chapters were numbered!Second, I've always been fascinated with just what goes on inside the mind of an autistic person, particularly children. This book was perfect for me in that sense. It was so touching at the same time, I'm pretty sure I shed a tear at least once.
  • (5/5)
    It's a very fast and very easy read. It is told from a unique point of view (person with learning difficulties) and, while I have no idea how "realistic" this insight is, it certainly is believable. It felt like it was an accurate description of an average working household that included a young man with Aspergers.There are a lot of "tangents" that the main character went off on, but this was part of the nature of his disability and made the story that much more realistic. The story is British and, if you were not familiar with British lifestyle (i.e. townhouses versus stand alone dwellings being the norm, A-levels being university entrance exams, huge crowds in the streets during "shopping" hours in a country that doesn't stay open 24-7...), it may lose you in places because the author doesn't attempt to clear up any "British-isms".
  • (5/5)
    Loved this book. A good story but also informative. Laura and Lachlan enjoyed it too.