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46: What Does a Private-Practice Based Neuroradiologist Do?: Session 46 Dr. Narayan Viswanadhan is a community-based Neuroradiologist in the Tampa area. We discuss why he chose the community, what his day looks like, and much more. He has been out of fellowship training for three years now. Also, check out all...

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Session 46 Dr. Narayan Viswanadhan is a community-based Neuroradiologist in the Tampa area. We discuss why he chose the community, what his day looks like, and much more. He has been out of fellowship training for three years now. Also, check out all our other podcasts on MedEd Media Network. [01:15] His Interest in Radiology and Neuroradiology When applying initially for residency, he applied for internal medicine into several programs. And as he was doing his sub-internships, the was drawn more into radiology. What he likes most about internal medicine is coming up with the differential diagnosis. He likes figuring out the root cause of the problem. But as he kept going into internal medicine, he was going further away from it. And during his radiology elective, he realized he enjoyed being the diagnostician or the doctor's doctor. And this was what drew him into radiology. "I really enjoyed being the diagnostician or the doctor's doctor kind of thing. That drew me to radiology." Moreover, neuroradiology got him as he was continuing his radiology residency. He enjoyed the anatomy and the complexity of it. He found it an elegant system and so he thought it was something he was fascinated with. And with the crossroad between technology, anatomy, and medicine, this is what made him go into neuroradiology. Other specialties drew him were those with modalities overlaying with MRI. He enjoyed musculoskeletal imaging. He thought sports medicine was interesting since he loves basketball. They also had a strong training in body imaging and having that strong background, he thought it would be a good opportunity to do further fellowship training in neuroradiology. [03:55] Traits that Lead to Becoming a Good Neuroradiologist Narayan thinks that you initially have to have a strong knowledge base with a detailed and comprehensive understanding of anatomy. There are so many anatomic structures you have to be aware of. "You can't play the game if you don't know the players. That's definitely the case for all of radiology." Additionally, you have to have a good background of anatomy, physiology, and pathology. Narayan thinks radiology is a long residency which takes seven years in total. Attention to detail is also another critical thing. You need to think about not just common stuff but esoteric stuff can easily come into play which makes a big difference in patient outcomes. You also have to be an effective communicator. You will be working into interdepartmental conferences with neurologists, neurosurgeons, primary care doctors, ENT doctors, and oncologists. So it helps to have that personality that can effectively communicate. It's nice that they can feel you're somebody they can go to and rely upon to provide the best care for the patient. [06:05] Community versus Academic Narayan was actually torn between going into community and academic settings since he applied to an array of both settings. He did a two-year neuroradiology fellowship. People who do this are more inclined to do academics. And he actually thought this was the career path he was going to choose since he enjoyed working with other residents, medical students, and fellows. "Typically, people who do two-year fellowships are more inclined to do academics." However, he felt he was going to miss a lot of the aspects of radiology that he grew to love including body imaging and procedures. So while he thought of both avenues, in the end, he didn't envision a career where he was going to focus on one sub-specialty for the rest of his life. And this is because he enjoys all the different aspects of medicine. [09:15] Percentage of Practice, and Patient Types Narayan explains that the beautiful thing about being a neuroradiologist working in a general setting is that while he has a niche, he also has the ability to a little bit of everything. This is from a diagnostic standpoint as well as from a light interventional standpoint. He feels he gets to utilize a little aspect of medi

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