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The Revisioners: A Novel

The Revisioners: A Novel

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Ratings:
Rating: 3.5 out of 5 stars3.5/5 (54 ratings)
Length: 274 pages4 hours

Description

Margaret Wilkerson Sexton won both the Crooks Corner Prize and the First Novelist Award from the Black Caucus of the American Libraries Association, and was longlisted for the National Book Award for her debut novel, A Kind of Freedom. Here she returns with her much-anticipated second novel, written with her signature eye for historical accuracy and movingly rendered interest in the intergenerational experiences of Black lives in America Already named among the Most Anticipated Books of 2019 by Electric Literature ("one of 48 books by women and nonbinary authors of color to read in 2019") Sexton lives in the Bay Area, CA and is from New Orleans, LA, and maintains strong connections in both communities Major national tour to include independent bookstores, libraries, museums, literary festivals, and cultural centers across the country Robust Indie Next and LibraryReads campaigns Lexile Measure: 820L

Praise from Booksellers

“The past informs the present in The Revisioners by Margaret Wilkerson Sexton. The contemporary story of Ava, who moves in to help her white grandmother, alternates with the story of her ancestor, Josephine. Born into slavery, but ultimately a free, land-owning woman, Josephine contains an almost mystical power. The evil legacy of slavery, however, will impact the lives of both women regardless of their internal strength. Sexton's novel is reminiscent of the works of playwright August Wilson and will leave an indelible mark upon each reader's soul.” —Pamela Klinger-Horn, Excelsior Bay Books (Excelsior, Minnesota) "Sexton's writing is gorgeous; her rich characters and vivid descriptions pull the reader through this intense multigenerational narrative. Time feels malleable, even fragile, while emotions feel more concrete; hope and fear are carried forward by new generations in a tale that is both haunting and lovely." —Amy Van Keuren, Bank Square Books (Mystic, CT) "Beautifully told from two perspectives in time—Josephine, formerly enslaved, and her descendant Ava. What this really captures are the voices of those who don’t traditionally have a voice, the ones whose presence has been erased in time, as well as the difficult history as to what those voices say. Despite being separated by generations, both women are united in parental love, as well as problematic relations with white people who subconsciously (or not) attempt to exert power over them." —Audrey Huang, Belmont Books (Belmont, MA) "Margaret Wilkerson Sexton’s The Revisioners is a tribute, a prayer, a triumphant cry of gratitude to those who came before us. The intergenerational memories and desire for freedom and survival push Ava forward when things get hard. Moving into her grandmother’s house with her son seems to be a temporary fix, but she has no idea the legacy she has inherited. The Revisioners honors with reverence the histories of those who had no voice." —Rachel Watkins, bookseller at Avid Bookshop (Athens, GA) "The Revisioners is a multigenerational story that spans more than 150 years, tracing the ancestral connection between contemporary mother Ava and her several times great-grandmother, Josephine. Ava is a single mother who moves in with her grandmother, a white woman, whose son, Ava’s father, has been largely absent from her life due to Ava’s tenuous position as his biracial child. The tensions between Ava and her grandmother are mirrored through the story of Josephine, a woman who was born enslaved but who is able, alongside her husband, to slowly buy their own land. Ava is connected to the women in her family through her ability to nurture, particularly her desire to become a doula, a gifted spiritual guide in the process of childbirth. Sexton weaves a powerful tale exploring the meaning of motherhood in the face of treacherous and undeniable obstacles, whether they be the desire for freedom in pre–Civil War Louisia
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The Revisioners: A Novel

Book Actions

Start Reading

Book Information

The Revisioners: A Novel

Ratings:
Rating: 3.5 out of 5 stars3.5/5 (54 ratings)
Length: 274 pages4 hours

Description

Margaret Wilkerson Sexton won both the Crooks Corner Prize and the First Novelist Award from the Black Caucus of the American Libraries Association, and was longlisted for the National Book Award for her debut novel, A Kind of Freedom. Here she returns with her much-anticipated second novel, written with her signature eye for historical accuracy and movingly rendered interest in the intergenerational experiences of Black lives in America Already named among the Most Anticipated Books of 2019 by Electric Literature ("one of 48 books by women and nonbinary authors of color to read in 2019") Sexton lives in the Bay Area, CA and is from New Orleans, LA, and maintains strong connections in both communities Major national tour to include independent bookstores, libraries, museums, literary festivals, and cultural centers across the country Robust Indie Next and LibraryReads campaigns Lexile Measure: 820L

Praise from Booksellers

“The past informs the present in The Revisioners by Margaret Wilkerson Sexton. The contemporary story of Ava, who moves in to help her white grandmother, alternates with the story of her ancestor, Josephine. Born into slavery, but ultimately a free, land-owning woman, Josephine contains an almost mystical power. The evil legacy of slavery, however, will impact the lives of both women regardless of their internal strength. Sexton's novel is reminiscent of the works of playwright August Wilson and will leave an indelible mark upon each reader's soul.” —Pamela Klinger-Horn, Excelsior Bay Books (Excelsior, Minnesota) "Sexton's writing is gorgeous; her rich characters and vivid descriptions pull the reader through this intense multigenerational narrative. Time feels malleable, even fragile, while emotions feel more concrete; hope and fear are carried forward by new generations in a tale that is both haunting and lovely." —Amy Van Keuren, Bank Square Books (Mystic, CT) "Beautifully told from two perspectives in time—Josephine, formerly enslaved, and her descendant Ava. What this really captures are the voices of those who don’t traditionally have a voice, the ones whose presence has been erased in time, as well as the difficult history as to what those voices say. Despite being separated by generations, both women are united in parental love, as well as problematic relations with white people who subconsciously (or not) attempt to exert power over them." —Audrey Huang, Belmont Books (Belmont, MA) "Margaret Wilkerson Sexton’s The Revisioners is a tribute, a prayer, a triumphant cry of gratitude to those who came before us. The intergenerational memories and desire for freedom and survival push Ava forward when things get hard. Moving into her grandmother’s house with her son seems to be a temporary fix, but she has no idea the legacy she has inherited. The Revisioners honors with reverence the histories of those who had no voice." —Rachel Watkins, bookseller at Avid Bookshop (Athens, GA) "The Revisioners is a multigenerational story that spans more than 150 years, tracing the ancestral connection between contemporary mother Ava and her several times great-grandmother, Josephine. Ava is a single mother who moves in with her grandmother, a white woman, whose son, Ava’s father, has been largely absent from her life due to Ava’s tenuous position as his biracial child. The tensions between Ava and her grandmother are mirrored through the story of Josephine, a woman who was born enslaved but who is able, alongside her husband, to slowly buy their own land. Ava is connected to the women in her family through her ability to nurture, particularly her desire to become a doula, a gifted spiritual guide in the process of childbirth. Sexton weaves a powerful tale exploring the meaning of motherhood in the face of treacherous and undeniable obstacles, whether they be the desire for freedom in pre–Civil War Louisia
Read More