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The Walking Dead Vol. 2
The Walking Dead Vol. 2
The Walking Dead Vol. 2
Ebook132 pages3 minutes

The Walking Dead Vol. 2

Rating: 3 out of 5 stars

3/5

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About this ebook

This volume follows our band of survivors on their tragic journey in search of shelter. Characters live and die as they brave a treacherous landscape littered with packs of the walking dead. Collects issues 7-12.
LanguageEnglish
Release dateDec 27, 2006
ISBN9781607065340
The Walking Dead Vol. 2
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Author

Robert Kirkman

Robert Kirkman is an American comic book writer. His first creation was Battle Pope, which he co-wrote with Tony Moore, and in 2003 they began the comic book series The Walking Dead, set in a George A. Romero zombie movie-inspired world.

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Reviews for The Walking Dead Vol. 2

Rating: 3.0350877192982457 out of 5 stars
3/5

627 ratings20 reviews

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  • Rating: 3 out of 5 stars
    3/5
    When I heard that AMC would be releasing the premier of The Walking Dead television series on Halloween night I was ecstatic. I'd previously only read the first volume of this graphic novel series but I knew this would not be a show to miss. I was determined to read as many back issues as I could before the premier. So for I'm up to Volume 9 and...

    ...this is one depressing series. In "Miles Behind Us," the remaining survivors hit the road in search of a safe haven. Of course, in the zombie apocalypse, food, shelter and safety are hard to come by. The group eventually finds what they think is an idyllic farm, but in this new world nothing lasts and no one is safe. Despite all the death and destruction, this is one of the few volumes that ends with a twinge of hope.
  • Rating: 4 out of 5 stars
    4/5
    Rick and the rest of the group leave Atlanta to find someplace safer to hole up against the zombies. They find an abandoned gated community and later a farm with a few people on it, but eventually they have to keep moving on.It's so fascinating to see how the plot of the comics weaves in and out of the plot of the TV show. There are less zombies in the comics, and more reflections on human nature, but I'm loving it either way.
  • Rating: 4 out of 5 stars
    4/5
    Okay, so I absolutely loved The Walking Dead Vol. 1: Days Gone Bye. It was my first graphic novel (so I think that pretty much guarantees that it's always going to be memorable) and it was just amazing! While I did like Volume 2, I don't think it compares to the pure awesomeness that is Volume 1. First things first: the plot. It was basically the same as the first one. I don't really have a problem with that (now anyway) as the plot is just so enjoyable. However, the whole pairing off, as another reviewer mentioned, did make Miles Behind Us seem more soap-operaish than the first one. It's just very unrealistic (I know that it's sort of a "Duh!" that a zombie graphic novel would be a bit unrealistic, but still) that people would be feeling particularly amorous while running from zombies. I know if I were in that situation, I would never be in the mood, being busy running for my life and all. Another thing that I noticed was that the artwork was different. I didn't really pay attention to who the illustrators were for the first one or for this one, but I kept thinking that something about the drawings was a bit off compared to Volume 1. Firstly, all of the women (with exception of Lori and the later newcomers) look the same. I kept confusing them. There just wasn't a lot of attention to detail. The drawings here were more dark and gritty (which I guess isn't too bad considering the subject matter was dark and gritty) and just weren't as great as the first volume. So when I (finally!) noticed that there were two different illustrators, I thought "That's what was bothering me!" Other than those minor flaws, I still enjoyed Miles Behind Us. The characters are still all in despair and still have to battle with their own humanity (and I love crap like that) and of course there is still all of the zombie goodness that zombie books/comics/films need. So I thought this was still good, just not as great as the first one. However, I am still looking forward to picking up volumes 3 and 4 (they're waiting for me at the library along with Y: The Last Man Vol. 1: Unmanned) and to watching the AMC show.
  • Rating: 3 out of 5 stars
    3/5
    Not impressed with the art in this volume. The quality has gone down and is nowhere close to what it was in Vol1.
  • Rating: 4 out of 5 stars
    4/5
    This survival story has a lot of elements that keep the reader enthralled and I love how the author dives headfirst into the speculative 'what if?' scenarios. Though the art has a few weaknesses, it is refreshing to read a comic that has both touchingly human characters and zombie action. Looking forward to reading the next volume when I can find it on the library shelf.
  • Rating: 3 out of 5 stars
    3/5
    I'm not a huge fan of Kirkman's dialogue. It comes off as a little corny at times, but I love the storylines nevertheless. I didn't like the artwork as much as that in the first volume. I must prefer Moore's crisp, detailed pieces and intricate shading over Adlard's seemingly rushed sketches and harsh tonation. At times it was difficult for me to tell one character from another. Overall, this is still a great series and I love it, but the artwork in this one didn't really grab me and pull me in as it did in the first.
  • Rating: 4 out of 5 stars
    4/5
    I'm loving this series. I'm amazed at how much of a storyline and plot the comics have. The author continues to develop the characters and makes me emotionally connected to the characters.

    I can't wait to get the next volume from the library!
  • Rating: 4 out of 5 stars
    4/5
    Not quite as good as the first one but definitely still a great, fun read. At the end of this volume, we are to the point to where I've seen in the tv show, so I'm really excited to read the next volume in this. TV show for the most part stays relatively close to the comic.



    This volume starts with a flash back to Lori and Shane having had sex. The tv show makes a much bigger deal of this then the comic, so I'm enjoying the comic a bit better. Lori already knows she's pregnant and there's no crazy scene with Glen trying to find her a pregnancy test. A few new people join the group.

    Art wise, good. Though the scene where Carl gets shot, I feel looks terrible. He's drawn almost like a character and not a child. We meet the people on the farm, and the barn is revealed quickly and honestly, not like the TV show where the group finds out about the zombies accidently. I guess they have to make it more dramatic for tv.





  • Rating: 3 out of 5 stars
    3/5
    Not impressed with the art in this volume. The quality has gone down and is nowhere close to what it was in Vol1.
  • Rating: 4 out of 5 stars
    4/5
    IThere are zombies on the cover of The Walking Dead: Volume 1: Days Gone Bye and; there are zombies inside the graphic novel; but this isn't really a zombie tale so much as it's a survival tale. In "Days Gone Bye," the focus is on the human element whereas the zombies are incidental. Rick Grimes, a police officer shot in the line of duty, wakes up from a coma in the hospital. He wakes to an abandoned facility, town, home, and basically, life as he knew it. Something has happened and now the the landscape is littered with zombies, alive-dead and dead-dead. His first instinct is to retain his civilized sensibilities and to reinforce his identity as an authority figure. He makes his way to the police station, dons his spare uniform, metes out guns and ammo to the first survivors he meets, grants them the use of a police cruiser and admonishes them to keep an eye out on his place while he heads in to Atlanta, GA. Even as he exits Cynthiana, KY, there are subtle cracks in his civilized veneer. Eventually, Rick ends up in an encampment of people who tried to make for the safety of the city but were too late to make their way in. At camp, the need for food, clean clothes and, secure shelter takes precedent over the social ethics of their former lives. Various members of the group each try to retain their individuality while trying to adapt to a group dynamic.

    Very little is discovered about the zombies in "Days Gone Bye." People die, they come back to an animated state. They bite people and the newly bitten become zombies in turn. The zombies here operate purely on an animal level of survival, apparently having the ability to smell and hear, all in the pursuit of something to eat. In "Days Gone Bye" the difference between the zombies and the survivors is clear, if only by degrees and speed. We'll see how long this lasts :-/

    Excepting the cover, the artwork in "Days Gone Bye" is black-and-white. The survivors are drawn with near cartoonish qualities: outlines without a lot of facial subtleties, many wide-eyed expressions and near comical distortions of the mouth. The zombies are consistently drawn with more detail and realism. Go figure. Because the panels are b&w, the integrity of the panels rests on the composition of the shots and ergo the gray tones or ink washes applied. Some are more difficult to execute than others (a scene around a campfire at night while snow falls vs a single head shot against a blank background) and Tony Moore and Cliff Rathburn met the challenges with varying degrees of success. A panel showing Rick and Glenn on a fire escape displays sophisticated layers and tones; but other scenes (e.g. Rick and Lori talking outside their tent) show less artful effort. [I do not know either Tony Moore's nor Cliff Rathburn's work well enough individually to be able to assess the handiwork of either's effort, only the combined effect in this volume.] In a couple of panels, characters were difficult to distinguish from each other. In a long shot, two characters are speaking; but there is not enough detail to determine who and, in another panel, I had to look very closely across several pages and, by the process of elimination, figure out who was speaking.

    The artwork is better than in "Days Gone Bye," though the ideas expressed in them are often more sophisticated than the medium itself.

    Redacted from the original blog review at dog eared copy, The Walking Dead: Volume 2: Miles Behind Us, 10/15/2011; Updated on 05/08/2012 with a captioned illustration and small text edits
  • Rating: 4 out of 5 stars
    4/5
    Whilst the passage of time is sometimes unclear, and some of the delivery a little lacking in subtlety, the series is definitely compelling.

    My comment on watching the TV show was "Too much soap opera human interest crap, not enough zombies"; perhaps something that could be true for most things. However this comic balances that end of things a little better.
  • Rating: 4 out of 5 stars
    4/5
    After Shane's departure, the group picks Rick as its leader and they leave the campsite, team up with Tyreese and his group, try to settle an infested estate, seek refuge at the Greene farm, and set eyes on what might be their only chance at survival. Another great installment in the series. Other than the art dropping a tiny piece in quality with the switch of artist, the character are getting more fleshed out and this is becoming a true ensemble piece, although Rick is at its core, which is a huge strength - it means that nobody is a redshirt and each and every one will be missed if they go. The kids are providing some great humor as well, such as Sophia, saying that "sexy" is the "grown up word for pretty ... I think."
  • Rating: 5 out of 5 stars
    5/5
    I probably wouldn't have bought this book if I hadn't already been watching, and really, really enjoying, "The Walking Dead" television series. Zombies are not as a general rule my cup of tea, but I do enjoy a good story.And these graphic novels are very good stories, good stories that go well beyond the normal splatter-fest of modern day horror stories, and have great character development and storylines.If you are trying to equate the original stories with the television series, this graphic novel, which collects together issues 7-12, concludes about where series 3 commenced, with them finding the prison. What is interesting is how the two storylines have major differences, who lives and who dies for instance, but the overall thrust and themes are equally engrossing.
  • Rating: 3 out of 5 stars
    3/5
    Continuing from the first book I was overall impressed with the story but thought it a bit too heavy on the relationship side of things. Also, I noticed early on the artwork was not quite as polished as it was in the first volume. Likely due to the artist being a different person now. Not quite as good as the first volume but the ending leaves a really interesting cliffhanger which makes me really want to read the next book.
  • Rating: 3 out of 5 stars
    3/5
    All of these terrible things happen, but here and there you still see glimpses of hope; people falling in love and trying to help each other. Of course it also goes the other way; people saying things that would normally never cross their lips and there seems to be some serious plotting going on. This series is totally interesting and what keeps it going is the characters. The plot will pretty much stay the same because their focus is going to be on surviving and finding a place to build a new home for themselves. Can't wait to find out what's next.
  • Rating: 5 out of 5 stars
    5/5
    I have to admit, my first impression upon opening the second volume of the Walking Dead series was "what happened to the drawings?" They're different. Moore no longer contributed his careful and beautiful drawings to these bloodthirsty, ravenous ghouls.But as I read the story, I realized that it wasn't entirely about the art. It was mostly about the writing. Adlard and Rathburn contributed drawings that, while nowhere near as detailed and amazing as Moore are otherwise good for conveying the story to the reader.In volume two, the survivors, post battle in which some of their number die, decide to press on. They look for other survivors as well as a place to survive. They encounter a former football player, his daughter, and her boyfriend. These folk are added to the group, though distrust lingers in the air.The find themselves at a nice, gated community. The ground is covered in snow, and it couldn't look more inviting. It's getting late, so they decide to spend the night in a few of the houses, and then in the morning, they'll clean them out of any lingering undead, and divide them up, living in an extremely safe community behind a sturdy gate.The sun comes out the following morning, melting the snow, revealing a sign that would have told them immediately that this was a bad idea.They escape, suffering more casualties, and make their way further until they get to a farm. There, the farmer (a veterinarian) and his children live in relative peace. Though when asked why they can't use the barn as sleeping quarters, the survivors find out that not everything is as bucolic as it would seem.Kirkman knows how to write a story that you just never want to end. He adds new, three-dimensional characters every once in a while so the number of survivors doesn't always approach zero as time approaches infinity. There are currently nine volumes of this series available in bound editions, and from what I've read, I think that all nine will be worth the time and money spend acquiring and reading them.The Walking Dead series will appeal to you if you're a fan of the classic zombie (that is, a zombie that is incapable of moving faster than a shamble). It goes along well with books by authors like Max Brooks, and films by directors like George A. Romero.
  • Rating: 5 out of 5 stars
    5/5
    Only one comment to the series from this point on - why oh why did the illustrator change on Volume II? Don't get me wrong; still love the series....just liked the art in Volume I better.

    ::Tony - you were missed::
  • Rating: 4 out of 5 stars
    4/5
    The "crap" is really starting to hit the fan in this volume. With the recent death of Shane the group decides it is best to put Rick in charge. Rick gladly takes on the responsibility and makes the decision that the group needs to pack up and move. Along the way they run into possibly one the most bad *ss characters to be left out of the show. Name: Tyreese weapon of choice for zombie killing: a hammer. Awesome! Tyreese joins the crew with family in tow and this group of misfits soon stumbles upon what they think is perfection, Wiltshire Estate. Ahhh yes but as the reader we know this story is far from having a happy ending.

    The group runs into some nonliving company and is forced to leave, quickly. While out searching for food the shot heard round the world happened and cue Uncle Hershel's farm, Ee i ee i oh. The events that lead up to Hershel's Farm and the events that take place at Hershel's farm are way different than the show so don't even think you already know what happened or is going too happened. Get your copy and READ!

    I really enjoyed this book I like how you are losing key characters all the time. It adds an element of surprise, no build up no suspense just bite and dead. The story takes place from the point of view from the living so you get the emotional aspect while you read. Also I really like how you get zombies, the show lacked a bit from episode to episode.
  • Rating: 1 out of 5 stars
    1/5
    I never would have read this.. or attempted to, if I hadn't run across it at my library. After buying and reading and then dumping (donating) the first volume I decided to give The Walking Dead another chance. I have been watching and ENJOYING the television series very much. The book is ALWAYS better than the movie (or in this case, the TV show), right? I thought so too, so after falling head over heels for The Walking Dead on TV, I had very high hopes for the comic books. But everything that bothered me in the first book got on my nerves even more in this one, and there were no new redeeming features introduced either.The dialog is stiff, unrealistic. Basically crap. The art, while apt for this type of book, seems sloppy and rushed. All the books I have read, including the collected book- (book two: #'s 13 thru 24) descend into cheesy soap territory. I normally don't like to judge a book before I've read it from cover to cover, but this time I was really struggling to keep reading, I was so bored and irritated. That says it all, I think!
  • Rating: 4 out of 5 stars
    4/5
    This is a decent follow up to the first volume and I look forward to reading more.

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The Walking Dead Vol. 2 - Robert Kirkman

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