Find your next favorite book

Become a member today and read free for 30 days
The Green Eagle Score: A Parker Novel

The Green Eagle Score: A Parker Novel

Read preview

The Green Eagle Score: A Parker Novel

ratings:
3/5 (57 ratings)
Length:
149 pages
Released:
May 1, 2011
ISBN:
9780226772820
Format:
Book

Description

Here’s Parker—planning to steal the entire payroll of an Air Force base in upstate New York, with help from Marty Fusco, fresh out of the pen, and a smart aleck finance clerk named Devers. Holed up with family in a scrappy little town, the hoisters prepare for the risky job by trying to shorten the odds. But the ice is thinner than Parker likes to think—and Marty’s ex-wife is much more complicated.

“Parker is refreshingly amoral, a thief who always gets away with the swag.”—Stephen King, Entertainment Weekly

“Westlake knows precisely how to grab a reader, draw him or her into the story, and then slowly tighten his grip until escape is impossible.”—Washington Post Book World

Released:
May 1, 2011
ISBN:
9780226772820
Format:
Book

About the author


Related to The Green Eagle Score

Read More From Richard Stark
Related Books
Related Articles

Book Preview

The Green Eagle Score - Richard Stark

You've reached the end of this preview. Sign up to read more!
Page 1 of 1

Reviews

What people think about The Green Eagle Score

3.2
57 ratings / 5 Reviews
What did you think?
Rating: 0 out of 5 stars

Reader reviews

  • (4/5)
    Dayum! The author manages to surprise me in every volume.
  • (3/5)
    Another good Parker book. Not much more I can say without spoilers, but it's nice to see the quality staying high & the plot as twisty. I FINALLY got the 1st one from the library. I'll be listening to it next.
  • (4/5)
    Parker gets roped into robbing an Air Force payroll. Problems abound-the guy who contacts Parker is in the job with his ex-wife's lover. And the ex-wife is seeing a psychiatrist. And the lover is new at the heist business.
  • (4/5)
    The Richard Stark books are perfect for reading while being self-quarantined. They are light, fun reads. I've read about two-thirds of the series, not in order as most stand alone very nicely, although I would suggest reading the early ones in order to set the stage, as it were.The Green Eagle Store is typical. Parker is enlisted to help plan an Air Force payroll heist. As nothing ever goes the way it's planned, something completely unforeseen happens and Parker has to scramble to make it away with any money. If you like caper books, these will please for sure. Then you can move on to Westlake's (Stark is a pseudonym for the Parker series) other books. Enjoy.
  • (4/5)
    It appears that as Stark (aka Westlake) went forward with the Parker series, his ideas about heists got wilder and crazier. Bank robberies and mansion robberies were one thing, but Stark had Parker go on to pull jobs on entire towns (“The Score”) and entire islands (“The Handle”) before deciding that it was time for Parker to take on the U.S. Air Force itself. Well, not exactly take on the air force, more like, take on the payroll of a large air force base. Apparently, in those crazy days, the payroll was in cash and it was big: $400,000 of big. It’s a crazy scheme that only a madman would think he could pull off and that’s before one stopped to think of all the problems that might crop up such as armed air police, one partner dating another partner’s ex- wife, the ex-wife spilling the scheme to her psychiatrist, make that her monetarily-desperate psychiatrist who has a deep fascination with all the details of the caper and knows people who might also be interested.

    It is a well-written story that moves quickly as do all of the Parker novels. You really can’t go wrong picking up any of the 24 Parker novels or the 4 related Grofield novels by Richard Stark.

    If you want insight into Parker’s character, you get it in the very first scenes he is with his girlfriend, Claire, in San Juan, Puerto Rico, where they are vacationing at a beachfront resort, her in her bikini, him upstairs talking to a pal who came by to talk about a scheme: the air force base scheme. Parker and Claire have a deal, she doesn’t ask him about his work and he doesn’t volunteer any information. Parker tells Claire that he is going for a few days to check things out and will probably be back soon, but, if the thing works out, if it looks good, then it might be a week or two. Parker also tells her that the rent on the hotel room is paid up for a month and, if he is not back by then, take what’s in the hotel safe, and go on to wherever. She understands, but doesn’t like it.

    A lot of the book, as in many of the Parker novels, is concerned with planning the caper and how Parker assesses the others involved in the operation and whether the amateur involved (the inside man) is up to the task.