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This picture book begins placidly (and familiarly) enough, with three pigs collecting materials and going off to build houses of straw, sticks, and bricks. But the wolf’s huffing and puffing blows the first pig right out of the story . . . and into the realm of pure imagination. The transition signals the start of a freewheeling adventure with characteristic David Wiesner effects—cinematic flow, astonishing shifts of perspective, and sly humor, as well as episodes of flight.Satisfying both as a story and as an exploration of the nature of story, The Three Pigs takes visual narrative to a new level. Dialogue balloons, text excerpts, and a wide variety of illustration styles guide the reader through a dazzling fantasy universe to the surprising and happy ending. Fans of Tuesday’s frogs and Sector 7’s clouds will be captivated by old friends—the Three Pigs of nursery fame and their companions—in a new guise.
Published: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt on
ISBN: 9780547532967
List price: $16.00
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The Three Little Pigs from the classic fairy tale escape the Big Bad Wolf by literally exiting the pages of their story. They end up wandering around in the "white space" outside of their story and end up wandering into other stories. The pigs meet the Cat and the Fiddle and a dragon from a fantasy adventure. These characters end up returning to the Pigs' story with them.I loved the images in this book. While the pigs are still in their own story, the images are simple and without much detail- not very life like. However, once the pigs leave their story, the images become very life like, and while the animals are simultaneously in both their story and out of the story, you can see the split in how the images are drawn. I thought David Wiesner's attention to detail in the images really brought this story to life. At one point, the pigs are wandering outside of their pages, and other pages from story books are floating in space, and some of the images are representative of images that occur in other of Wiesner's stories. Definitely a great book to use to discuss point of view and how to take a well known story and changing it up to make it original.more
"Little pig,little pig, let me come in", said the wolf. The wolf is determined to blow down the pig's house made of straw. Not only did he blow down the house but he blew the pig right out of the story! The wolf then goes to the next pig's house and blew his house down. This pig too is blown right out the story. Then comes the third pig and out the story three pigs. They go around to different stories and gather others who need help. At the end they find the pig's story. They all take out the pages of the wolf blowing down the house. And they lived happily ever after. This story can teach children about using imagination. I would read this book before having the children do a creative writing activity.more
One of Wiesner's award winners and deservedly so, due to excellent images and a compelling story. This is Wiesner's take on the classic tale that has a different ending. There are also glimpses into other Fairy Tales throughout the book. Kids will love the unexpected ending and story that takes a different direction.more
The Three Pigs by David Wiesner is a fictional children’s picture book that is similar to the children’s story The Three Little Pigs. Both stories start the same way, all three pigs build different houses to live in and the wolf threatens to blow each of them done. However, instead of each pig running to the other pig’s house, they each escape through the white spaces on the page. The major difference is that the pigs travel through other children’s stories to escape the wolf. I, personally, did not like the new changes to the storyline. The Three Little Pigs was my favorite story when I was a kid and it is the first book that I learned to read. However, the new changes to add a little more creativity to the original story, and can allow children to use their imagination more after the read the story because they can imagine what other stories they can combined together.more
David Wiesner's fiction story The Three Little Pigs was a little different then I originally thought it would be. It starts out like the story of The Three Little big has always started off. The pigs build their houses and then the wolf comes and huffs and puffs and blows the houses down. In this story though, the first pig is blown out of the story because the wolf blew so hard trying to blow the pig’s house down. By the time the wolf gets to the brick house the three pigs end up out of the story. They make it in to other stories and as the book comes to the end they all end up in the brick house that the third pig made. I think the theme of this book is to not be expectant of what is going to happen. I was expecting this to be like the book I read as a child and it had a whole scene added to this story.I thought the book was very interested and not what I expected at all. I thought it was going to be the story I always heard as a kid, but as I kept reading I was curious to know what was going to happen next. I agree with the author of this book. I think he took a great book and made it in to something just as great, but with a little bit of twist. I never expected the book to be different from what I have always known The Three Little Pigs to be about. I don’t believe the book raises any issues. I love how the three pigs venture into other books and meet friends. This book made me realize that I shouldn’t always expect a story or book to turn out the way I think it is suppose to.more
I love the Caldecott and Newbery awards - they generally steer me in the direction of quality books ... just like The Three Pigs. The story deconstructs the original fable in a delightfully fun story. It begins as always: the three pigs build three houses, and the Big Bad Wolf comes along to huff, and puff, and blow the house down. This time, though, the wolf puffs the pig right out of his story. Shocked at his unexpected salvation, the pig follows along with his story and arrives just in time to rescue his brother from the wolf. The two pigs track down their final sibling, and decide to stroll around and peek in other books, which are all represented by corridors of illustrated pages that belong to different stories. They pop in to the Hey Fiddle Fiddle rhyme, and the curious cat follows them out, and then the whole gang scoots over to a fairy tale - fortunately for the dragon, who is spared the knight's sword. Now that their party is enlarged by a huge toothsome beast that breathes fire, they deem it safe to return to their comfortable house (the last one standing) and the big bad wolf decides that a dragon is a bit much to chew. That may be the whole story in a nutshell, but it does not convey the spirit of the book. Wiesner is known for his lavish illustrations, and his skill in this book shines. The story starts out in pictures that resemble old picture books of fairy tales. Once the pig is blown out, though, the art is apparently rendered via computer graphics - it has that densely realistic texture to it. When they visit the nursery rhyme, all the characters, pigs included, take on the look of a pastel painting appropriate for the cow jumping over the moon. And when the join the dragon's story, all turn to black-and-white. I love the use of illustration here! It's not just the colors that change, it's the whole style of illustration, the medium used, that changes for each story. I wish I were an artist to have the terminology to explain it. The effect is incredible.Also, the way Wiesner plays with the fourth wall is a lot of fun. This idea that storybook characters can exit their story. Where is that blank white area that they find? What is this intriguing corridor of stories. At one point, a pig is illustrated looking straight at the reader and remarks that he thinks someone is out there. That's great. The book presents the dynamic relationship between reader and story in a visually compelling format, and is a fun story, besides. Deserving of the award, and multiple reads.more
The Three Pigs is an interesting take on the fairy tale version. This book incorporates many other different fairy tales into one. It's funny, gets the kids involved, has all the classic fairy tales rolled into one and is an easy read! As a future teacher this book is good for my personal library. Ages k-3.more
And old story remade with a different ending. Nothing super amazing about the book though.more
The Three Little Pigs leave the page and set off for adventure in an alternate universe story book land. David Wiesner's Caldecott-winning illustrations are as complex and inspired as the text and students will see more and more upon multiple reads.more
(easy, picture, fairy/fantasy) My kids really enjoyed this book and the illustrations are exquisite:imaginative and cute. The only difficulty I had in reading this book aloud to children was determining where to interject the animal's dialog balloons to have the story continue to make sense. I ended up paraphrasing and narrating in addition to reading the text and the dialog balloons. While I may not have enjoyed reading the book that way, it didn't seem to bother the kids at all! They thought the book was funny and they laughed all the way through. The parts that they know (such as the pig in 3 little pigs:" not by the hair of my chinny-chin-chin) they recited along with me. When I asked the children what they liked best they said: that the pigs kept pulling along other characters to join them. When I asked what they did not like, they said: Nothing!more
Children (8 yrs) with delight over the fractured pics, story and words as their favorite fairy tale characters jump in and out of story books exploring new and familiar worlds.more
Read all 80 reviews

Reviews

The Three Little Pigs from the classic fairy tale escape the Big Bad Wolf by literally exiting the pages of their story. They end up wandering around in the "white space" outside of their story and end up wandering into other stories. The pigs meet the Cat and the Fiddle and a dragon from a fantasy adventure. These characters end up returning to the Pigs' story with them.I loved the images in this book. While the pigs are still in their own story, the images are simple and without much detail- not very life like. However, once the pigs leave their story, the images become very life like, and while the animals are simultaneously in both their story and out of the story, you can see the split in how the images are drawn. I thought David Wiesner's attention to detail in the images really brought this story to life. At one point, the pigs are wandering outside of their pages, and other pages from story books are floating in space, and some of the images are representative of images that occur in other of Wiesner's stories. Definitely a great book to use to discuss point of view and how to take a well known story and changing it up to make it original.more
"Little pig,little pig, let me come in", said the wolf. The wolf is determined to blow down the pig's house made of straw. Not only did he blow down the house but he blew the pig right out of the story! The wolf then goes to the next pig's house and blew his house down. This pig too is blown right out the story. Then comes the third pig and out the story three pigs. They go around to different stories and gather others who need help. At the end they find the pig's story. They all take out the pages of the wolf blowing down the house. And they lived happily ever after. This story can teach children about using imagination. I would read this book before having the children do a creative writing activity.more
One of Wiesner's award winners and deservedly so, due to excellent images and a compelling story. This is Wiesner's take on the classic tale that has a different ending. There are also glimpses into other Fairy Tales throughout the book. Kids will love the unexpected ending and story that takes a different direction.more
The Three Pigs by David Wiesner is a fictional children’s picture book that is similar to the children’s story The Three Little Pigs. Both stories start the same way, all three pigs build different houses to live in and the wolf threatens to blow each of them done. However, instead of each pig running to the other pig’s house, they each escape through the white spaces on the page. The major difference is that the pigs travel through other children’s stories to escape the wolf. I, personally, did not like the new changes to the storyline. The Three Little Pigs was my favorite story when I was a kid and it is the first book that I learned to read. However, the new changes to add a little more creativity to the original story, and can allow children to use their imagination more after the read the story because they can imagine what other stories they can combined together.more
David Wiesner's fiction story The Three Little Pigs was a little different then I originally thought it would be. It starts out like the story of The Three Little big has always started off. The pigs build their houses and then the wolf comes and huffs and puffs and blows the houses down. In this story though, the first pig is blown out of the story because the wolf blew so hard trying to blow the pig’s house down. By the time the wolf gets to the brick house the three pigs end up out of the story. They make it in to other stories and as the book comes to the end they all end up in the brick house that the third pig made. I think the theme of this book is to not be expectant of what is going to happen. I was expecting this to be like the book I read as a child and it had a whole scene added to this story.I thought the book was very interested and not what I expected at all. I thought it was going to be the story I always heard as a kid, but as I kept reading I was curious to know what was going to happen next. I agree with the author of this book. I think he took a great book and made it in to something just as great, but with a little bit of twist. I never expected the book to be different from what I have always known The Three Little Pigs to be about. I don’t believe the book raises any issues. I love how the three pigs venture into other books and meet friends. This book made me realize that I shouldn’t always expect a story or book to turn out the way I think it is suppose to.more
I love the Caldecott and Newbery awards - they generally steer me in the direction of quality books ... just like The Three Pigs. The story deconstructs the original fable in a delightfully fun story. It begins as always: the three pigs build three houses, and the Big Bad Wolf comes along to huff, and puff, and blow the house down. This time, though, the wolf puffs the pig right out of his story. Shocked at his unexpected salvation, the pig follows along with his story and arrives just in time to rescue his brother from the wolf. The two pigs track down their final sibling, and decide to stroll around and peek in other books, which are all represented by corridors of illustrated pages that belong to different stories. They pop in to the Hey Fiddle Fiddle rhyme, and the curious cat follows them out, and then the whole gang scoots over to a fairy tale - fortunately for the dragon, who is spared the knight's sword. Now that their party is enlarged by a huge toothsome beast that breathes fire, they deem it safe to return to their comfortable house (the last one standing) and the big bad wolf decides that a dragon is a bit much to chew. That may be the whole story in a nutshell, but it does not convey the spirit of the book. Wiesner is known for his lavish illustrations, and his skill in this book shines. The story starts out in pictures that resemble old picture books of fairy tales. Once the pig is blown out, though, the art is apparently rendered via computer graphics - it has that densely realistic texture to it. When they visit the nursery rhyme, all the characters, pigs included, take on the look of a pastel painting appropriate for the cow jumping over the moon. And when the join the dragon's story, all turn to black-and-white. I love the use of illustration here! It's not just the colors that change, it's the whole style of illustration, the medium used, that changes for each story. I wish I were an artist to have the terminology to explain it. The effect is incredible.Also, the way Wiesner plays with the fourth wall is a lot of fun. This idea that storybook characters can exit their story. Where is that blank white area that they find? What is this intriguing corridor of stories. At one point, a pig is illustrated looking straight at the reader and remarks that he thinks someone is out there. That's great. The book presents the dynamic relationship between reader and story in a visually compelling format, and is a fun story, besides. Deserving of the award, and multiple reads.more
The Three Pigs is an interesting take on the fairy tale version. This book incorporates many other different fairy tales into one. It's funny, gets the kids involved, has all the classic fairy tales rolled into one and is an easy read! As a future teacher this book is good for my personal library. Ages k-3.more
And old story remade with a different ending. Nothing super amazing about the book though.more
The Three Little Pigs leave the page and set off for adventure in an alternate universe story book land. David Wiesner's Caldecott-winning illustrations are as complex and inspired as the text and students will see more and more upon multiple reads.more
(easy, picture, fairy/fantasy) My kids really enjoyed this book and the illustrations are exquisite:imaginative and cute. The only difficulty I had in reading this book aloud to children was determining where to interject the animal's dialog balloons to have the story continue to make sense. I ended up paraphrasing and narrating in addition to reading the text and the dialog balloons. While I may not have enjoyed reading the book that way, it didn't seem to bother the kids at all! They thought the book was funny and they laughed all the way through. The parts that they know (such as the pig in 3 little pigs:" not by the hair of my chinny-chin-chin) they recited along with me. When I asked the children what they liked best they said: that the pigs kept pulling along other characters to join them. When I asked what they did not like, they said: Nothing!more
Children (8 yrs) with delight over the fractured pics, story and words as their favorite fairy tale characters jump in and out of story books exploring new and familiar worlds.more
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