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From the Publisher

Learn how to get your precise horoscope, decipher astrological symbols, and benefit from the phases of the moon with Astrology for Dummies, Second Edition. You’ll learn how to construct your birth chart, interpret its component parts, and use that information to gain insight into yourself and others. With easy-to-follow, hands-on guidance, you’ll discover how to: Identify the signs of the zodiac Understand the Sun, the Moon, the planets, the rising sign, and the 12 houses Discover the rulers of the signs Map your own horoscope (or a friend’s) Use astrology in daily life Capture the heart of each sign of the zodiac, and more!

Astrology for Dummies, Second Edition demystifies astrological charts and uses plain English to show you how you can take advantage of the wisdom of the stars. Whether you’re looking to assess relationships, examine your potential, or make some basic decisions — like, when to go on a first date — Astrology for Dummies, Second Edition helps you discover how understanding your position in the cosmos illuminates the secret corners of the self, provides a key to understanding others, and even offers a glimpse into the future.

Topics: Astrology, How-To Guides, and Informative

Published: Wiley on
ISBN: 9781118051153
List price: $19.99
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