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From the Publisher

Reveals the Mayan calendar to be a spiritual device that describes the evolution of human consciousness from ancient times into the future

• Shows the connection between cosmic evolution and actual human history

• Provides a new science of time that explains why time not only seems to be speeding up in the modern world but is actually getting faster

• Explains how the end of the Mayan calendar is not the end of the world, but a path toward enlightenment

The prophetic Mayan calendar is not keyed to the movement of planetary bodies. Instead, it functions as a metaphysical map of the evolution of consciousness and records how spiritual time flows--providing a new science of time.

The calendar is associated with nine creation cycles, which represent nine levels of consciousness or Underworlds on the Mayan cosmic pyramid. Through empirical research Calleman shows how this pyramidal structure of the development of consciousness can explain things as disparate as the common origin of world religions and the modern complaint that time seems to be moving faster. Time, in fact, is speeding up as we transition from the materialist Planetary Underworld of time that governs us today to a new and higher frequency of consciousness--the Galactic Underworld--in preparation for the final Universal level of conscious enlightenment. Calleman reveals how the Mayan calendar is a spiritual device that enables a greater understanding of the nature of conscious evolution throughout human history and the concrete steps we can take to align ourselves with this growth toward enlightenment.
Published: Inner Traditions on
ISBN: 9781591438960
List price: $18.00
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