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“After years of self-centered wandering, shielding my shattered spirit from further vain expectation, I now knew what it was to be loved.” Yet…. “A cursed, damaged, aging wretch as I had no right to one so innocent, lovely, good and gifted as she…” Edward Fairfax Rochester. He remains one of nineteenth-century English literature’s most enduring sex symbols, and, to this day, women the world over continue to swoon for him.Rochester is an imaginative exploration of Charlotte Bronte’s Jane Eyre as seen through the eyes of a fiercely sensuous and introspective leading man. His story is told with all the realism of a passionate, masculine heart in narrative enriched with keen observations of settings and fellow players. Through Edward’s words, we leave behind coincidence and politesse to wander through his evocative world and probe what otherwise might have happened from that compelling first meeting onward. We are given Edward’s life of pain and travel beside him to absolution through the unsullied form of a lonesome young governess. Here, Rochester tells of their journey in his own uninhibited, saucy, conceited, funny, manly way and would never dream of fading to black when the bedchamber door shuts.
Published: Trafford on
ISBN: 9781426979743
List price: $9.99
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Availability for Rochester
    When I bought this book I don't know what I expected but surely it wasn't this. Beware readers who are thirsty to relive Jane and Mr. Rocherster's story, because this is no Jane Eyre. Not at all. Neither the plot nor the characters are close to Charlotte Brontë's original story. Rochester appears as a macho man on the surface and a weakling just beneath, struggling to suppress his sexual attraction for both Jane and Miss Ingram. He is not the thrilling and mysterious creature we know of Brontë's novel, and his childish doubts and his wearisome wanderings make a rather pitiful character. Jane. Oh, Jane is even worse. A "virgin" slut, if I might say so. Seeking only physical gratification, and a person full of a self assurance never known in the original novel. Where is the sensitive Jane? Where is the hurt soul who is uplifted after meeting someone who treats her as her equal? In Brontë's novel the important things are spiritual, not physical. I don't mean that Jane & Rocherster's love should be a platonic one, but that the singularity of their love is just that it's above any "normal" relationship, based mainly on sexual attraction.In this "adaptation" we seem to jump from hot scene to hot scene, cheapening everything which was beautiful and true in Jane Eyre. I'd recommend you to read some Danielle Steel's or Lavyrle Spencer's if you want erotic entertainment. In my opinion, it's a disgrace tauting the characters with such a low and distasteful adaptation. A pity.more
    Strangely intriguing. Very sexual. Interesting insight into Mr. Rochester. Anxious to read the sequels.more

    Reviews

    When I bought this book I don't know what I expected but surely it wasn't this. Beware readers who are thirsty to relive Jane and Mr. Rocherster's story, because this is no Jane Eyre. Not at all. Neither the plot nor the characters are close to Charlotte Brontë's original story. Rochester appears as a macho man on the surface and a weakling just beneath, struggling to suppress his sexual attraction for both Jane and Miss Ingram. He is not the thrilling and mysterious creature we know of Brontë's novel, and his childish doubts and his wearisome wanderings make a rather pitiful character. Jane. Oh, Jane is even worse. A "virgin" slut, if I might say so. Seeking only physical gratification, and a person full of a self assurance never known in the original novel. Where is the sensitive Jane? Where is the hurt soul who is uplifted after meeting someone who treats her as her equal? In Brontë's novel the important things are spiritual, not physical. I don't mean that Jane & Rocherster's love should be a platonic one, but that the singularity of their love is just that it's above any "normal" relationship, based mainly on sexual attraction.In this "adaptation" we seem to jump from hot scene to hot scene, cheapening everything which was beautiful and true in Jane Eyre. I'd recommend you to read some Danielle Steel's or Lavyrle Spencer's if you want erotic entertainment. In my opinion, it's a disgrace tauting the characters with such a low and distasteful adaptation. A pity.more
    Strangely intriguing. Very sexual. Interesting insight into Mr. Rochester. Anxious to read the sequels.more
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