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Gregory Chaitin, one of the world’s foremost mathematicians, leads us on a spellbinding journey, illuminating the process by which he arrived at his groundbreaking theory.

Chaitin’s revolutionary discovery, the Omega number, is an exquisitely complex representation of unknowability in mathematics. His investigations shed light on what we can ultimately know about the universe and the very nature of life. In an infectious and enthusiastic narrative, Chaitin delineates the specific intellectual and intuitive steps he took toward the discovery. He takes us to the very frontiers of scientific thinking, and helps us to appreciate the art—and the sheer beauty—in the science of math.


From the Trade Paperback edition.
Published: VintageAnchor an imprint of Random House Publishing Group on
ISBN: 9780307488176
List price: $13.99
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Algorithmic complexity can not be reliably determined! Whoa. There goes several attempts at formal software development cycles.more
A very clear introduction to the main ideas of algorithmic complexity and how they connect with epistemology. The basic idea is that there are certain facts that cannot be explained in the sense that any explanation is provably more complex than the facts themselves. A very nice feature of this book is Chaitin's enthusiasm for doing mathematics and the sense of elation, adventure and discovery (as opposed to rule following) that goes with it. The idea that insight comes first and proof later and that insight is hard hard work that, when reached, brings great great joy.more
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Algorithmic complexity can not be reliably determined! Whoa. There goes several attempts at formal software development cycles.more
A very clear introduction to the main ideas of algorithmic complexity and how they connect with epistemology. The basic idea is that there are certain facts that cannot be explained in the sense that any explanation is provably more complex than the facts themselves. A very nice feature of this book is Chaitin's enthusiasm for doing mathematics and the sense of elation, adventure and discovery (as opposed to rule following) that goes with it. The idea that insight comes first and proof later and that insight is hard hard work that, when reached, brings great great joy.more
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