Yup, we’ve got that one

And more than one million more. Become a member today and read free for two weeks.

Read free for two weeks

Still reeling from his wife's recent miscarriage, Moe Prager is bullied into taking the case of an up-and-coming politico whose career has stalled over the suspicious disappearance of a young woman. It's been almost two years since Moira Heaton, State Senator Steven Brightman's intern, vanished on Thanksgiving Eve 1981. In spite of Brightman's best efforts to clear his name, he has been tried and convicted in the press. As a reluctant Moe peels away the layers of the case, he discovers the tragic circumstances of Moira Heaton's disappearance are buried deep in the past and that there is another more heinous crime at the heart of it all. Will the ugly truth set Brightman free or will it bury all the players beneath the crumbling artiface of corruption, murder, and hate?

Published: F&W, a Content and eCommerce Company on Jan 15, 2005
ISBN: 9781440541018
List price: $7.99
Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
Availability for The James Deans
With a 30 day free trial you can read online for free
  1. This book can be read on up to 6 mobile devices.
Clear rating

Whenever we go to a new city, we always seek out the independent bookstores. I especially look for the mystery bookstores and have come to ask the same question of each one: what are some must read mysteries? Thanks to the great saleman at Mystery on Main Street in Brattleboro, VT, I have now become a Moe Prager fan, whose mysteries are written by Reed Farrel Coleman (who looks like a private eye). When I read that Coleman is coming out with a new book, I knew I had to catch up with the 5 or 6 books in the series (I’d only read two.)There are some mysteries that are action packed and some that are riveting courtroom dramas. But there are few where you get to know the characters, where there is a life outside of crime. Ed McBain’s 87th Precinct series is one that comes to mind and Moe Prager is another. Moe is an everyday guy. He lives in Sheepshead Bay, Brooklyn. He was disabled while on the NYPD force due to a freak accident and was retired. He owns a wine store with his brother Aaron and keeps his private detective license in case a case comes up. His claim to fame was finding a missing girl when no one else could and this keeps haunting him because missing person cases seem to keep coming his way.In The James Deans, when Moe and his wife, Katy, are invited to the posh wedding of a former wine store employee, he wonders why. He soon finds out. Her well heeled father, Thomas Geary, wants Prager to find out what happened to Moira Heaton, an intern in State Senator Steve Brightman’s office. She left one day about a year ago and never returned. All eyes turn to Brightman. Of course a detective agency was hired, with no results. So Geary turns to Prager to clear Brightman’s name so he can resume his meteoric rise in politics. Prager finds out what happens to Moira and more.Moe Prager is a truly likeable guy. He’s smart, philosophical, realistic and caring. Coleman’s writing is readable, enjoyable and unpretentious. His plots are realistic. There are some slimeballs, some nice guys and some characters to be pitied in Moe Prager’s life.While you don’t have to read the series in order, I’d do it since there aren’t too many books to catch up on and they’re fast reads. I’d probably pick up a nice bottle of wine to get in the mood, kick back and relax. Let me know what you think.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
(Moe Prager series #3) The best I've read so far from Coleman. I was bothered by his repeating a missing person as the subject for the third time. But it was an interesting story with an unusual plot twist. I'm hoping that Coleman and Prager keep improving. And what's up with the large print thing at my library? All of Coleman's are for some reason.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
The first two-thirds of this book are as good as mysteries get. The characters are sharply drawn and the relationships are subtle and believable. Moe Prager is asked, then corerced into looking into a missing persons case where a once promising politician's career is stalled because everyone believes he had somethng to do with his female intern's disappearance. Moe was a policeman who became disabled when he slipped on a piece of carbon paper at work. He and his brother have opened thier second wine store and are sucessful as businessmen in the Reganomics Era of 1983. Moe loves his wife and they are slowly dealing with a recent miscarriage. Moe is the opposite of so many detectives in fiction - he is a good husband, father and brother. He takes the case because it is the right thing to do, and discovers what happens to the girl in a story that has almost perfect pacing. One of the things that rings truest in the story is the use of New York City, especially the use of Brooklyn as Moe drives across the city meeting his friends and the family of the missing girl. Everything rings true.Then he solves the case. But he begins to have nagging doubts about the confession that solved the case. Then he crosses the state line and goes into New Jersey and the case starts to fall apart. But even more problematic for the reader is that the writing that was so poignant and clearly developed in the first two-thirds of the book becomes disjointed and clumsy. Moe goes from New Jersey, to Chicago, and then on to Miami. He sends his friend to California for obscure reasons and then comes back to Brooklyn and confronts the bad guy in a very unbelievable ending. The book does recover somewhat in the Epilogue. The well developed characters and the subtlety of the first part of the book returns. What you liked about the book is there as the book ends. But the New Jersey, to Chicago, to Miami leg of the trip is a disappointment.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Read all reviews

Reviews

Whenever we go to a new city, we always seek out the independent bookstores. I especially look for the mystery bookstores and have come to ask the same question of each one: what are some must read mysteries? Thanks to the great saleman at Mystery on Main Street in Brattleboro, VT, I have now become a Moe Prager fan, whose mysteries are written by Reed Farrel Coleman (who looks like a private eye). When I read that Coleman is coming out with a new book, I knew I had to catch up with the 5 or 6 books in the series (I’d only read two.)There are some mysteries that are action packed and some that are riveting courtroom dramas. But there are few where you get to know the characters, where there is a life outside of crime. Ed McBain’s 87th Precinct series is one that comes to mind and Moe Prager is another. Moe is an everyday guy. He lives in Sheepshead Bay, Brooklyn. He was disabled while on the NYPD force due to a freak accident and was retired. He owns a wine store with his brother Aaron and keeps his private detective license in case a case comes up. His claim to fame was finding a missing girl when no one else could and this keeps haunting him because missing person cases seem to keep coming his way.In The James Deans, when Moe and his wife, Katy, are invited to the posh wedding of a former wine store employee, he wonders why. He soon finds out. Her well heeled father, Thomas Geary, wants Prager to find out what happened to Moira Heaton, an intern in State Senator Steve Brightman’s office. She left one day about a year ago and never returned. All eyes turn to Brightman. Of course a detective agency was hired, with no results. So Geary turns to Prager to clear Brightman’s name so he can resume his meteoric rise in politics. Prager finds out what happens to Moira and more.Moe Prager is a truly likeable guy. He’s smart, philosophical, realistic and caring. Coleman’s writing is readable, enjoyable and unpretentious. His plots are realistic. There are some slimeballs, some nice guys and some characters to be pitied in Moe Prager’s life.While you don’t have to read the series in order, I’d do it since there aren’t too many books to catch up on and they’re fast reads. I’d probably pick up a nice bottle of wine to get in the mood, kick back and relax. Let me know what you think.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
(Moe Prager series #3) The best I've read so far from Coleman. I was bothered by his repeating a missing person as the subject for the third time. But it was an interesting story with an unusual plot twist. I'm hoping that Coleman and Prager keep improving. And what's up with the large print thing at my library? All of Coleman's are for some reason.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
The first two-thirds of this book are as good as mysteries get. The characters are sharply drawn and the relationships are subtle and believable. Moe Prager is asked, then corerced into looking into a missing persons case where a once promising politician's career is stalled because everyone believes he had somethng to do with his female intern's disappearance. Moe was a policeman who became disabled when he slipped on a piece of carbon paper at work. He and his brother have opened thier second wine store and are sucessful as businessmen in the Reganomics Era of 1983. Moe loves his wife and they are slowly dealing with a recent miscarriage. Moe is the opposite of so many detectives in fiction - he is a good husband, father and brother. He takes the case because it is the right thing to do, and discovers what happens to the girl in a story that has almost perfect pacing. One of the things that rings truest in the story is the use of New York City, especially the use of Brooklyn as Moe drives across the city meeting his friends and the family of the missing girl. Everything rings true.Then he solves the case. But he begins to have nagging doubts about the confession that solved the case. Then he crosses the state line and goes into New Jersey and the case starts to fall apart. But even more problematic for the reader is that the writing that was so poignant and clearly developed in the first two-thirds of the book becomes disjointed and clumsy. Moe goes from New Jersey, to Chicago, and then on to Miami. He sends his friend to California for obscure reasons and then comes back to Brooklyn and confronts the bad guy in a very unbelievable ending. The book does recover somewhat in the Epilogue. The well developed characters and the subtlety of the first part of the book returns. What you liked about the book is there as the book ends. But the New Jersey, to Chicago, to Miami leg of the trip is a disappointment.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Average mystery, the writing was a little heavy-handed and the plot was a bit too twisty (but no real surprises) for my taste.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
A real pulp mystery with all the charm of a 1950's series. Moe Prager, an ex-policeman facing a family crisis tries to solve a cold case of a missing girl. Well written, well plotted and a great read.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
scribd