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Updated through the 2012 Olympics.

On a July afternoon in 1999, the proudest moment for U.S. soccer occurred in Pasadena, California. In the presence of more than 90,000 fans and viewed by another 40 million on television, the U.S. women outlasted China to win the World Cup. Although the United States has lagged far behind other countries in the men's game, it has been at the forefront when it comes to women's soccer.

In the second edition of
The U.S. Women's Soccer Team: An American Success Story, Clemente A. Lisi examines how the sport has gained popularity over the past few decades. While other books have been written about the team during a specific year, such as those focused solely on the World Cup win on U.S. soil, Lisi looks beyond this event, detailing the program's infancy and how it steadily became a model for women's teams around the globe.

Beginning with the start of the U.S. program in 1985, Lisi recounts the development of the women's team, highlighted by their two first place finishes in the Women's World Cups (1991 and 1999) and four Olympic women's gold medals (1996, 2004, 2008, and 2012). In addition to chronicling the history of the team as a whole, this book offers mini profiles and photographs of some of the best players over the years, including Julie Foudy, Amy Rodriguez, Hope Solo, and Mia Hamm.




Published: RowmanLittlefield on May 26, 2010
ISBN: 9780810874169
List price: $37.99
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In addition to just getting more copies of a book into the hands of booksellers, there are at least two other good reasons for publishing a new edition:1. To add new information.2. To correct errors.In both of these respects, the second edition of "The U.S. Women's Soccer Team: An American Success Story" by Clemente A. Lisi is a disappointment. To be sure, the first edition of the book, published in 2010, has been updated in the 2013 version. Lisi, a reporter for the New York Post, adds coverage of the team through the 2012 Olympics. Yet this new chapter seems hurriedly written and will not satisfy anyone who remembers the Americans' gold medal victory and might hope for something more than what was read in newspaper coverage last summer.And while parts of the book have been updated, other parts have not been. In his introduction, Lisi writes, "Women's Professional Soccer hopes to pick up where the Women's United Soccer Association left off -- and, this time, succeed. The jury is still out on what the outcome will be and whether the league will be a viable, moneymaking operation." On page 147, he reports that Women's Professional Soccer folded in 2012.On page 77, we are told Christine Lilly "remains an active member of the squad." On the very next page, we read that she retired in 2010.As for typos, there are more than you would expect in a second edition (or even a first edition, for that matter). Lisi describes a "hunderbolt shot" and writes about "brining Solo back." Writing about the 2004 Olympics, he says, "Germany could have forced a penalty-kick shootout had Renate Lingor's free kick slid wide of Scurry's goal." Surely there should be a "not" in there somewhere.The book reads like a collection of excerpts from press clippings, which is exactly what it is to judge from the notes at the end of each chapter. Only occasionally does Lisi dig below the surface, as when he analyzes the strengths and weaknesses of the team's various coaches.This is a book that will appeal only to the most diehard fans of women's soccer. I happen to be one of these, so I read it with interest, albeit also with disappointment.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
A great, interesting read. The book is laid out so that each chapter covers the lead up & finals for one major tournament (Olympics or World Cup), and it serves as a nice compact history of the US Women's Soccer Team. It serves as a brief, entertaining history of the Women's Team, and even though I was already familiar with all the events depicted in the book it was great to be able to relive the teams highs & lows (only as low as third place!!). The book described each tournament (and the lead-up) in a quick, fast paced, but still detailed and interesting style. A great book for devoted followers of the team or the new soccer mom or dad who's daughter (or son) has just started playing the game. The women on the team are all phenomenal athletes and wonderful role models for kids.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
I found this book to be an enjoyable, quick read. Each chapter focuses on a major tournament that the U.S. women played in and describes how the games unfolded and how the ultimate result of the tournament affected the team’s development. Each chapter was filled with quotes and play-by-plays of games, but I felt that they were a bit short and simplistic. The sheer number of quotes that were used often made the chapter and narrative a bit disjointed it – I felt it could have used more analysis to tie everything together. I was often left wanting after each chapter, hoping for more in-depth analysis of the people and/or events. I’ve followed the U.S. women’s soccer team for almost a decade now, and would consider myself a pretty well-informed fan. Because of this, I was already familiar with many of the events being described. But they would be an easily accessible and informative introduction for someone less familiar with the team. However, I had never learned so much about the early days of U.S. women’s soccer and how the team was first established. So I especially appreciated those sections and the wealth of personal interviews conducted by the author that provided insight into how the players were feeling at the time and what they thought about the events. It was very interesting to see how the U.S. team and women’s soccer worldwide have evolved and grown over the last few decades.Overall, I enjoyed the book and would recommend it to any fan of women’s soccer or anyone looking to learn more about a group of remarkable women that have made history and changed the face of women’s sports.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
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In addition to just getting more copies of a book into the hands of booksellers, there are at least two other good reasons for publishing a new edition:1. To add new information.2. To correct errors.In both of these respects, the second edition of "The U.S. Women's Soccer Team: An American Success Story" by Clemente A. Lisi is a disappointment. To be sure, the first edition of the book, published in 2010, has been updated in the 2013 version. Lisi, a reporter for the New York Post, adds coverage of the team through the 2012 Olympics. Yet this new chapter seems hurriedly written and will not satisfy anyone who remembers the Americans' gold medal victory and might hope for something more than what was read in newspaper coverage last summer.And while parts of the book have been updated, other parts have not been. In his introduction, Lisi writes, "Women's Professional Soccer hopes to pick up where the Women's United Soccer Association left off -- and, this time, succeed. The jury is still out on what the outcome will be and whether the league will be a viable, moneymaking operation." On page 147, he reports that Women's Professional Soccer folded in 2012.On page 77, we are told Christine Lilly "remains an active member of the squad." On the very next page, we read that she retired in 2010.As for typos, there are more than you would expect in a second edition (or even a first edition, for that matter). Lisi describes a "hunderbolt shot" and writes about "brining Solo back." Writing about the 2004 Olympics, he says, "Germany could have forced a penalty-kick shootout had Renate Lingor's free kick slid wide of Scurry's goal." Surely there should be a "not" in there somewhere.The book reads like a collection of excerpts from press clippings, which is exactly what it is to judge from the notes at the end of each chapter. Only occasionally does Lisi dig below the surface, as when he analyzes the strengths and weaknesses of the team's various coaches.This is a book that will appeal only to the most diehard fans of women's soccer. I happen to be one of these, so I read it with interest, albeit also with disappointment.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
A great, interesting read. The book is laid out so that each chapter covers the lead up & finals for one major tournament (Olympics or World Cup), and it serves as a nice compact history of the US Women's Soccer Team. It serves as a brief, entertaining history of the Women's Team, and even though I was already familiar with all the events depicted in the book it was great to be able to relive the teams highs & lows (only as low as third place!!). The book described each tournament (and the lead-up) in a quick, fast paced, but still detailed and interesting style. A great book for devoted followers of the team or the new soccer mom or dad who's daughter (or son) has just started playing the game. The women on the team are all phenomenal athletes and wonderful role models for kids.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
I found this book to be an enjoyable, quick read. Each chapter focuses on a major tournament that the U.S. women played in and describes how the games unfolded and how the ultimate result of the tournament affected the team’s development. Each chapter was filled with quotes and play-by-plays of games, but I felt that they were a bit short and simplistic. The sheer number of quotes that were used often made the chapter and narrative a bit disjointed it – I felt it could have used more analysis to tie everything together. I was often left wanting after each chapter, hoping for more in-depth analysis of the people and/or events. I’ve followed the U.S. women’s soccer team for almost a decade now, and would consider myself a pretty well-informed fan. Because of this, I was already familiar with many of the events being described. But they would be an easily accessible and informative introduction for someone less familiar with the team. However, I had never learned so much about the early days of U.S. women’s soccer and how the team was first established. So I especially appreciated those sections and the wealth of personal interviews conducted by the author that provided insight into how the players were feeling at the time and what they thought about the events. It was very interesting to see how the U.S. team and women’s soccer worldwide have evolved and grown over the last few decades.Overall, I enjoyed the book and would recommend it to any fan of women’s soccer or anyone looking to learn more about a group of remarkable women that have made history and changed the face of women’s sports.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Beginning with the introduction, you can feel the passion of the author for the sport. However, the book is not particularly compelling or well written. I wanted to enjoy the book and I have colleagues and friends that would enjoy the topic but I would not be comfortable recommending it. It could use a good editor.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
This is the second edition of this book. It outlines the history of the Women'n Soccer team. The US has come a long way to become champions. For anyone interested in soccer, it is a must read book. I am thinking of many young women who like to follow the path of the Women's Soccer team, this is a book to get inspiration from. To read about what is possible!
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I won the second edition of this book through the ER program.I feel bad giving this book two stars because I love US Soccer, and especially love US Women's Soccer. But, honestly, to me the book was just sorta boring. Perhaps it was because I lived through every moment of the book myself. And, I already knew 99% of the facts and that's all that was in the book really, facts and quotes from other sources.The book started with the '91 World Cup and the stuff leading up to it and then there was a chapter for each World Cup and Olympics that the US Women's Soccer Team participated in after that. But, the thing is that it was all so dry and matter of fact. He got all the nitty gritty details lined up in the right order, but it almost read like someone took the media articles and reprinted them in book form.To me, what makes a non-fiction book great is if it has a 'storyline' running through it. Something that connects the different parts and gives the book a narrative instead of having it be just a bunch of facts smushed together.As an aside, I never noticed just how much the US female soccer players' last names change to and fro during their careers (Marriage and Divorce).I did like the grey boxed bios of some of the star players. Although I'm unsure why he put some in there and left others out that I would have put in. Not to mention I wish that some of the less 'star' players had gotten their own grey boxes bios as well, like Kai or Hucles. I already knew all about Hamm, Wambach, Solo, but learning more about Rapinoe, Kai, etc. would have been cool.So, let me put it this way. If someone knows absolutely nothing about the US Women's Soccer Team's history, their journey from '85 to the present, it's a four star book. It has all the pertinent facts, figures and quotes about the history, but for me, since I lived through it and when some of it was happening read the news articles then, the book was boring.I guess it just depends on the readers point of view.
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