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From the Publisher

Do ever wish that you could write the perfect university essay? Are you left baffled about where to start? This easy-to-use guide walks you through the nuts and bolts of academic writing, helping you develop your essay-writing skills and achieve higher marks. From identifying the essay type and planning a structure, to honing your research skills, managing your time, finding an essay voice, and referencing correctly, Writing Essays For Dummies shows you how to stay on top of each stage of the essay-writing process, to help you produce a well-crafted and confident final document.

Writing Essays For Dummies covers:

Part I: Navigating a World of Information 
Chapter 1: Mapping Your Way: Starting to Write Essays
Chapter 2: Identifying the essay type

Part II: Researching, Recording and Reformulating
Chapter 3: Eyes Down: Academic reading 
Chapter 4: Researching Online
Chapter 5: Note-taking and Organising your Material 
Chapter 6: Avoiding Plagiarism                                                             

Part III: Putting Pen to Paper  
Chapter 7: Writing as a process  
Chapter 8: Getting Going and Keeping Going                                          

Part IV: Mastering Language and Style     
Chapter 9: Writing with Confidence
Chapter 10: Penning the Perfect Paragraph        
Chapter 11: Finding Your Voice                                                                

Part V: Tightening Your Structure and Organisation
Chapter 12: Preparing the Aperitif: The Introduction   
Chapter 13: Serving the Main Course: The Essay’s Body               
Chapter 14: Dishing up Dessert: The Conclusion                            
Chapter 15: Acknowledging Sources of Information                                 

Part VI: Finishing with a Flourish: The Final Touches
Chapter 16: It’s all in the detail                              
Chapter 17: Perfecting Your Presentation           
Chapter 18: The afterglow                                     

Part VII: Part of Tens &160

Topics: Writing, Informative, Prescriptive, and How-To Guides

Published: Wiley on
ISBN: 9781119996545
List price: $21.99
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