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Pam Jenoff, whose first novel, The Kommandant’s Girl, was a Quill Award finalist, a Book Sense pick, and a finalist for the ALA Sophie Brody Award, joins the Doubleday list with a suspenseful story of love and betrayal set during the Holocaust.

An ambitious novel that spans decades and continents, The Things We Cherished tells the story of Charlotte Gold and Jack Harrington, two fiercely independent attor­neys who find themselves slowly falling for one another while working to defend the brother of a Holocaust hero against allegations of World War II–era war crimes.

The defendant, wealthy financier Roger Dykmans, mysteri­ously refuses to help in his own defense, revealing only that proof of his innocence lies within an intricate timepiece last seen in Nazi Germany. As the narrative moves from Philadelphia to Germany, Poland, and Italy, we are given glimpses of the lives that the anniversary clock has touched over the past century, and learn about the love affair that turned a brother into a traitor.

Rich in historical detail, Jenoff’s astonishing new work is a testament to true love under the worst of circumstances.


From the Hardcover edition.
Published: Doubleday an imprint of Random House Publishing Group on
ISBN: 9780385534215
List price: $11.99
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The Things We Cherished, Pam JenoffThe story really begins in Bavaria, with the seemingly innocent introduction of a handmade clock, in 1903. It is an Anniversary Clock, a unique clock that is wound only once a year, that has been built by a farmer who hopes to sell it for enough money to pay for passage to America for himself and his pregnant wife. The book then fast forwards to 2009 where we meet Charlotte, a lawyer from a modest background, daughter of a Holocaust survivor. Once very much in love, she was jilted by her boyfriend. Brian decided to get engaged to a woman who was from the same social class and more compatible to him. Instead of working as planned, with him at The Hague, she changes course and becomes a Public Defender in Philadelphia. After several years pass, Brian reappears suddenly and asks for her help. He is representing Roger Dykmans against the charge of being a Nazi collaborator responsible for sending many innocents to their deaths, including his own brother. If Brian is successful in getting him an acquittal, he is virtually guaranteed to make partner in his firm.Charlotte spent three years studying the Holocaust in Eastern Europe and is a great forensic investigator. Her mother is now dead, and all of her other close relatives died in Europe at the hands of the Nazis, so she is very much interested in the case. Although she is still smarting from the pain of her broken engagement, she consents to give Brian a week’s time, if he will help one of her clients in return. Brian believes that Charlotte will be able to discover evidence with her forensic skills and will provide a plausible defense for his client. He believes he has missed something in his own investigation, and so he agrees to her terms.Charlotte sets off for Germany, only to be stood up at the airport by Brian, who said he was unavoidably delayed, and so she is forced to travel alone. Once in Germany, she is shocked to find that it is Brian’s brother with whom she will be working in this investigation, even though the brothers are still very much estranged. Together, they travel to Poland and investigate the war years in order to try and prove Dykmans’ innocence. Dykmans, himself, is unwilling to help in the investigation to clear his name. Charlotte is often put off by Mike’s coldness and distance and an uneasy, seesaw working relationship develops. She wonders if he dislikes her and why. As their friendship grows, the development of a romance in the story feels a little bit contrived, at first, but for the most part, it comes together, in the end.As they investigate Dykmans’ past, they learn of a great secret love in his life. Between the two of them they discover many subtle subplots that intertwine, sometimes not very clearly, but they all do eventually connect and work their way into the plot and the mystery’s solution. The novel serves to explain how hard it was to survive during the war and how hard it was to help each other, even with the best of intentions, and yet, love somehow survived and thrived, lasting decades, even in the absence of hope and the loss of the loved one. It was a time when no one could be trusted and evidence was easily lost or destroyed. Happy or unhappy coincidences often meant the difference between life and death. What is it that holds the key to the puzzle of Roger’s guilt or innocence and will it be discovered in time? To find out, you must travel with Charlotte and Roger on their journey to discover the truth.more
I gave this three stars because the story about prosecuting an even very aged war criminal was a good premise.Also,the love story in it that involved not those in their 20's but slightly seasoned people in their 30's was a very believable one.I think one of the characters,Hans was based on a Raoel Wallenberg of Sweden type person. He was a diplomat who angled atgreat risk to rescue thousands of doomed Jews. I am thinking that in a non neutral country,Nazi occupied this person would not have beenallowed to run around as freely as he did. Also,I am fairly positive that his younger brother,Roger,later accused ofthe war crime would not be going to university in now German Poland as a healthy,able bodied young man in his 20's. Having thetime to romance Han's wife.He would most likely have been in the army and wound up on the Russian front.Also,the Germans would have very,very meticulous in knowing the background of this supposed diplomat'swife and her Jewishness. That said,the dates are also wrong. By 1942 no Jewish men were hanging around asynagog waiting for shul to begin. They would have been in a ghetto or transit camp at that point.I say not the usual demographic as I doubt most of her readers have read as many books on World War two as Ihave since first picking up The Diary of Anne Frank in 1963. I have also been watching shows like the TwentiethCentury with my Dad in the 60's,The World At War and The History channel for years and years.more
This book alternates between two interconnected stories. It begins with Charlotte and Jack, two attorneys who find themselves working together on the defense of Roger, a man accused of crimes during World War II. The alternate story is one of a clock, its origin, how it was passed down from person to person and then ultimately how it affects the first story.I'm not quite sure what the point of the book was. The plot was imaginative, but it didn't really work for me. The writing was well done, but the book just didn't grab me. Overall, not a home run, but I would read something else from the author.more
Loved this book! Again--a war novel set in 2009 with flashbacks to a mystery from Nazi occupied Poland and surrounding countries. Such great characters and i couldn't put it down. Definately add this to your "Must Read" list.more
Charlotte Gold, a public defender in Philly, is approached by another attorney (who happens to be her ex) to help him defend an accused WWII war criminal. Charlotte is an experience researcher and good with witnesses. Roger Dykmans, the defendant, refuses to help in his defense and she is sought out to help the situation.Enter a lot of background information on Dykmans, Charlotte and the Warrington brothers, Brian and Jack. Brian dumped Charlotte 10 years ago for another woman. Jack is high-strung and aloof. Roger Dykmans could be a monster but seems not. Each chapter goes back and forth from past to present, giving more information about the mystery surrounding Roger and the attorneys. I liked the historical references and the background on the Jewish population in Poland before the war. It's an interesting history and could have been more prevalent in the story. It was all kind of predictable. Rather short story for the kind of history that took place.more
"The Things We Cherished" is an energizing experience that speaks of two love stories and a time period prior to WWII when the world was in turmoil.Charlotte Gold and Jack Warrington team up to defend Roger Dykmans who is accused of betraying his brother, Hans, who was attempting to rescue Jewish people from Germany.Roger won't help with his defense and the attorneys go to Wadowice, Poland to learn about his background. They learn of Madga who Roger loved but was married to his brother, Hans.Back in 1940 we observe what was happening in Berlin when the Germans were rounding up Jewish people who lived in fear of betrayal and being taken away by the authorities. Roger, who was not Jewish, came to Berlin as a student, to live with Hans and Magda.The story slows down as we learn about the independent Magda who didn't want to be a captive in her own home, just because she was Jewish. With Hans gone much of the time, she and Roger become romantically involved.Both Charolotte and Jack are fully drawn charactrers of whom the reader becomes attached and wish that they will succeed in their goal and their lives.This is a heartfelt story with an ending that will remain in the memory of the reader.more
I really enjoyed this book even though it does contain that air of mystery to it. I am not particularly fond of mysteries (too many Nancy Drew in my youth, I guess), but this mystery actually kept me reading the book as I really wanted to know what secret the clock contained and what happened to Roger's lover. There is a two-fold story to the book: one story is set back in war-time 40's Europe, the other in the modern day. Seeing that I completely appreciate war time novels, I actually enjoyed the 1940's story line much more. The book does have elements of romance to it, however. I am certainly not a fan of romance novels (except Sparks') and was quite pleased to find that this book did not contain the x-rated version found so commonly in books today. People just don't have imagination anymore. The love story set back in the 40's was very appreciable as romance like that doesn't exist in this day and age, hence my aversion of modern day romance which I could have done without in the book. Give it a try if you are into historical novels set in war time Europe, but tread lightly if you are completely aversive to romances!more
Very quick read - not incredibly in depth with character or development or literary meanings, but a nice enjoyable story that makes you want to keep on reading.more
I have read a few books by Pam Jenoff and I have always been blown away by her beautiful, thoughtful writing style. That was no exception with The Things We Cherished - her writing gives the book an anchor and really underlines the high stakes that Charlotte is facing. Additionally, it highlights the importance and the tragedy of the Holocaust while softening its blow. It makes the book compulsively readable and ensures that the weighty subject matter of the book never drags the reader down.Jenoff has created some great characters in The Things We Cherished. Charlotte is very sympathetic; she is conflicted by Brian’s reappearance and enraged that he takes her for granted, yet she can’t stay away from the case. Both Brian and his brother are a little flat, but Charlotte is fully realized. The magic of the book, though, is in its historical characters. The reader only sees some of them for a few pages, yet Jenoff really breathes life into them and makes them three dimensional and very relevant for the reader.The mystery behind the war crimes was a bit of a let down and I’m not sure I could really sympathize with it, but moral ambiguity is an important part of the book. However, I could understand the overall sadness and uncertainty of the World War II time period, and thought Jenoff did an exceptional job evoking that time in history, especially with the uncertainty for Jews. The Things We Cherished deals with a very important subject matter in a manner perfect for those who choose to shy away from more difficult, depressing reads. While there is a sadness that permeates the book, it is not a gloomy read.Overall, I enjoyed The Things We Cherished and am hopeful that this might be the start to a series. I would love to read more about Charlotte’s pursual of Nazi war criminals, while also finding justice for those falsely accused. While I’m not sure that this will happen, given the ending of the book, either way, I look forward to seeing what Pam Jenoff does next.more
Charlotte Gold is happy as an attorney in the public defender’s office working with challenging juvenile cases. A very different job than the one she had as an associate at a large New York firm. She thought those days were behind her now but out of nowhere Brian, a man from the past who had broken her heart, shows up in her office to ask a favor. A wealthy client of Brian’s firm, Roger Dykmans, has been accused of WWII era crimes and he needs her to assist with the defense. Charlotte has a background in these types of cases and her expertise would be invaluable.Charlotte agrees to help with the case for one week. She arrives in Germany only to find that the client will not cooperate in his own defense other than to say the proof of his innocence lies in an antique clock. To further complicate matters the attorney that Charlotte is assisting in Germany is Brian’s brother, whom with she finds herself becoming romantically involved.In alternating chapters we go back to the turn of the century Bavaria to learn the history of the clock and it’s significance in Roger’s defense. I like the use of this technique to interweave a story from the past to the present. I found the story of the clock and it’s various owners to be more interesting than Charlotte’s story in the present.It’s not believable that Charlotte would drop everything and run off to help someone that she had not spoken to in years and when she last encountered him he was telling her to get lost and that he had replaced her with a new girlfriend. Within a short period of time he married that new girlfriend. No, that is not someone I would dash off to another continent to help. I also had trouble believing that Charlotte would fall for the brother so quickly, after all she was there to work not on a holiday.If you’re looking for a fast, light read and a fantasy romance this book would be a good choice. The tale of the clock added a mystery and there was an interesting twist with the story lines neatly tied up in the end. I don’t read a lot of romances; I picked this one up because of the historical and mystery angle. As far as the romance, if you like Danielle Steele novels you will probably love this book.more
First of all, I really liked the cover of this book! The plot seemed very interesting and as World War II is one of my favorite time periods to read about, I was very excited to read this book. However, the first time I picked this up about two and a half months ago (I won an ARC), I just could not get into the story. I recently picked it back up and found the story much more gripping this time. The mystery wove around multiple characters from multiple time periods, and it was very satisfying to see how everything came together at the end. I was disappointed with the abrupt closure to the mystery and almost felt that I had been set up for a better ending; not a different outcome necessarily, but a stronger resolution. The romance between the characters was also shallow; it did not feel real and was so on again-off again that I really could not empathize with either of them. That being said, the other characters' stories as well as the historical elements were fabulous, and I really could not wait to find out what happened to each of the historical characters.The Things We Cherished had quite a few language issues as well, more than I cared to read. That lowered the book in my opinion as well. Overall, the story was interesting but the resolution and chemistry were a little weak.more
The story line sounded so interesting, I kept thinking this book should be better than it was. Told in alternating chapters, between the past and present but the tension was missing and the romance between the two main characters just didn't sizzle, for what was supposed to be a great love.more
I was pleasantly surprised by this book. Pam Jenoff takes the reader on a journey that illuminates all of the joys and fears of the past. This novel brings to light man's ability to sacrifice everything in the face of love. Through many twists and turns, Jenoff's writing attaches the reader to the characters, allowing them to experience everything the characters experience. This novel is meant to transport you to those far away countries, and entice you to experience those places through the eyes of those of the past. It is a great novel that takes you out of your home and plants you in a world of deceit and treachery. I highly recommend this book to anyone who has a sweet tooth for historical fiction, you'll be sure to love it.more
This was a pretty good book. I won an advanced reader's edition, so there were some typos and errors, but it wasn't that bad. I liked how the chapters would switch time periods and you had to figure out how all the different characters pieced together. I didn't feel like the wrap up at the end was that great though. It seemed pretty abrupt. Although this book dealt with the Holocaust, I didn't feel like I learned a whole lot.more
The Things We Cherished is an interesting piece of historical fiction centering on a war crime committed during World War II, a crime that cost the life of the alleged war criminal’s brother, as well as the lives of several hundred Jewish children he was on the brink of saving. Now, more than six decades later, Roger Dykmans, the man accused of betraying his own brother, is refusing to defend himself against the accusations of those who believe he should be imprisoned for the remainder of his life.Charlotte Gold, a Philadelphia public defender, is startled one morning to find her longtime ex-lover waiting for her inside her drab office. Despite being a bit dismayed by both her physical and her emotional reactions to the man, Charlotte finds herself agreeing to help Brian build a defense for Roger Dykmans. However, upon her arrival in Germany to work on the case, Charlotte finds that she will be spending much more time working with Brian’s estranged brother, Jack, than she will be spending with Brian. As Charlotte and Jack begin the research that will see them searching the old man’s childhood home for evidence that would prove him innocent, the novel settles into a series of flashbacks that conclude at the time of the crime that Roger Dykmans is accused of having committed. At the heart of the story is an antique anniversary clock that changes hands every decade or two, until it rests, finally, with the Dykmans family. In separate flashbacks, we witness the clock being constructed by a simple farmer who learned the trade from his father, and follow it as it passes from one loving couple to the next for most of the next century. Ultimately, the clock will determine the fate of Roger Dykmans. The Things We Cherished, as plotted by Pam Jenoff, works; it has a story to tell, and it gets the job done. I do, however, think it would have worked even better if less attention, and fewer pages, had been given to the budding romance between Charlotte and Jack. While it is true that the modern romance uncannily mimics the World War II romance experienced by Roger Dykmans, it does little to advance the story other than to emotionally bond Charlotte to the old man. The Things We Cherished would have been a much stronger book if it had been constructed as an historical fiction novel with elements of romance thrown into the mix. As it is, it reads more like a romance novel with some historical fiction thrown in for good measure.Rated at: 3.0more
When Charlotte's ex, Brian, shows up in her office asking for help on a case, she wants to say no. She really does. Instead she finds herself in Germany working on Brian's case with Brian's brother Jack (Brian himself being unable to make it). Their client, Roger Dykmans, is accused of WWII-era war crimes, and though he refuses to cooperate with his own defense team, he insists that he is innocent. As Charlotte and Jack investigate Roger's past, they end up getting to know each other, and Charlotte begins to see Jack in ways she never expected to see an ex's sibling.Chapters alternate between Roger's life in the 1930s and earlier and Charlotte and Jack in present day, with flashes of a turn of the century clockmaker mixed in. Jenoff really managed to create atmosphere in the past stories in a way that was lacking the the present day storyline. On the other hand, the past stories weren't nearly as fleshed out as that of Charlotte and Jack. The romance in each of the storylines was convincing, complicated, and (mostly) tragic, but they all lined up a little too nicely for my taste. Once something happened in Roger's life it was easy to see how it would be replicated in Charlotte and Jack's interactions. But while the plots of the past and present stories were connected, 1930s Roger seemed to have very little to do with 2000s Roger. In the present day he is just a reason for Charlotte and Jack to flit about Europe and do some digging; he never really became a character. I get it; his life was SUPER tragic and he deserves to spend his old age locked in a shell. Still. And (not to get to spoilery) Jenoff takes an easy out of the one situation that could make past-Roger and present-Roger collide.Even so, this was a pretty enjoyable read. I just wish that when it came time for an ending, Charlotte and Jack weren't Jenoff's only concerns.Book source: ARC provided by the publisher through LibraryThing's Early Reviewer programmore
What a beautiful book! Although the end result between the hero and heroine was predictable, the seamless transitions between the time periods and the truth they reveal is pure genius. This isn't even usually a genre I enjoy but I couldn't put it down. I enjoyed how it wasn't your typical Holocaust story, but delved more into the relationship between the Jews and their non-Jewish Polish neighbors, something that isn't often touched. I hope this one is made into a movie. I'll be first in line.more
I just finished this and sadly I feel underwhelmed. I'm a fan of Pam Jenoff's books so I was expecting a lot more from The Things We Cherished, but it just never got interesting to me. There were times when I felt it was getting momentum but then it would fizzle.more
This is a story about a handmade, heirloom clock, the plight of Jews in Europe during the 1800s and 1900s, and also parallel stories of two women who fall in love with two different men who happen to be brothers. Charlotte Gold is asked by her ex-boyfriend to defend a wealthy man charged with a Nazi war crime. His brother Jack also happens to be involved in defending the man, Roger Dykmans. Roger won't tell Charlotte and Jack his side of the story, so the two lawyers begin an investigation to find out the truth of what happened over 60 years earlier. In my opinion, the premise for this book was just too ambitious. It would have been nice if it were about 200 pages longer, adding more "meat" to all of the different stories going on in the book. I could see the potential here for a great book, but that potential fizzled out fairly quickly. The mystery was wrapped up neatly and a bit too conveniently at the end. Ditto the love story. Recommended for a fast, light read but not if you're looking for a book to lose yourself in.more
This is one of those books that I could register many complaints about, and yet I still enjoyed reading it.Philadelphia public defender Charlotte Gold takes leave from her job helping juveniles to take on the defense of Roger Dykmans, an octogenarian in Germany charged as a war criminal for collaborating with the Nazis. His alleged betrayal resulted in the death of his brother Hans as well as the many Jews Hans was trying to save. Charlotte is talked into the venture by her ex-boyfriend Brian, not realizing that, in Germany, she will be working with Brian’s estranged brother Jack.As the story weaves back and forth in time, we learn what really happened with Roger and Hans, as we also watch the growing attraction between Charlotte and Jack. And tying together the two strands is the story of an old anniversary clock, passed down through the generations, and holding the key to critical events in the lives of the protagonists.Discussion: I liked this book and sped right through it. But it’s not as polished as I hoped. The parallel love stories that take place in the past and the present, and the heirloom that passes along through the generations and draws the characters together are both overused plot devices. And neither one is developed in a way innovative enough to justify yet another rendition. A lot of the background information given on the Holocaust is delivered didactically, and should have been more smoothly integrated into the story. Some of the characters are improbably or irritatingly clueless in matters of the heart. Brian and Jack, both supposedly top-flight lawyers, often seem like amateurs, especially with respect to dealing with witnesses and evidence.Last but not least, the outcome was as predictable as could be.So why did I like it? Even a hackneyed plot is enough for me for a story that (a) deals with the moral complexities of war crimes; (b) features legal procedural elements; (c) includes a romance; and (d) has some nuance in at least some of the characters. But more than that: war adds poignancy and drama to stories; it provides swelling background music. It lends life or death urgency to the most mundane activities. The farther we are from the actual impact of fighting and death, the more we find war to be romantic. And even if it is close to us, we know that no other experience in life can match it for intensity. Thus the most hackneyed ideas can be immeasurably enhanced, and we may even superimpose our own knowledge of the setting to reinforce that which is provided by the author.Do I recommend this book? Yes. I would actually compare it in a way with “The Postmistress.” I had a lot of complaints about that book as well, but it had similar elements that induced me to like it in any event. And if you don’t know a lot about what it was like to live in Germany during WWII, this story is very helpful in that regard.more
What if you are forced with the choice of making the worst possible choice for the best possible reason? The Things We Cherished is a novel which explores this dilemma through interweaving tales. The central story revolves around the defense of Roger Dykmans, a wealthy Polish financier, and brother of a resistance hero, who has been charged with war crimes. Though Roger refuses to help in his own defense, Charley and Jack Warrington begin to delve into his past to unravel the mystery. In doing so, they also unravel their own past, for Jack is the estranged brother of Charley's ex-fiance. As the modern day story begins to heat up, the back story starting in Poland in the early 1900's also expands. The action, past and present, travels thorough Germany, Poland and Italy, as the quest to find the reasons behind Roger's actions unfold. The book held my interest, because of the backstories mostly, despite a few complaints I might have about character development.On a personal level there were a couple of interesting tidbits in this novel. One is that my husband and I were given an Anniversary Clock much like the one Johann created, as a wedding gift. I was fascinated to learn more about the history of these clocks, and even more determined to get ours working again. It went on the fritz a few years ago after 25 years of marriage, though the marriage is still going strong.The other bit that was incredibly fascinating to me is that I became quite familiar with the area of Berlin that features in several of the back-story spots. The New synagog and the Jewish Quarter of Mitte -- even one of the spots in the story, in a Berlin segment, during WWII, has been turned into a hotel. It is this hotel that we stayed in, on Rosenthaler Platz, when we visited Berlin last spring. The story of the family who'd had a shop and home there before and during the war was documented in the hotel. I could picture Rosenthaler Strasse in my mind when reading that section of the book.more
While helping to defend Roger Dykmans, for the possible betrayal of his brother Hans during WWII, resulting in the murder of Hans and the Jewish children he tried to save, Charlotte Gold, currently a Philadelphia defense lawyer, finds herself in an emotional quandary. Jack Warrington is the first lawyer on the case. Charlotte had dated and loved Brian, Jack's younger brother, who left her for Danielle, now his wife. Their investigation turns up information about Hans' Jewish wife, Magda, providing a key reason Roger will not defend himself. Because Charlotte cares about people, she is motivated to connect the dots of Hans', Roger's and Magda's lives during such dreadful, dangerous times to learn the truth. A major theme running throughout the novel is brothers. A man who saves his brother's life, another who hurts his brother profoundly, and brothers who simply are very different and don't get along. I understand that Jenoff was trying to show various fraternal relationships throughout time. But the squabbling, competitiveness, and argumentativeness between Brian and Jack is distracting, and only acts to detract from the flow and importance of the main story. Also, the timing of the call Jack receives which puts the last puzzle piece in place, conveniently solving the "mystery" is tired and contrived. It should have come a year or years later. I think this novel has much unrealized potential.more
Pam Jenoff wrote a very moving and pulling novel. It was written very well. There were two major categories: the past and the present. I loved the way she pieced together the story like a puzzle. She either wrote about the historical element of the novel which included the story of the clockmaker, the history of the family heirloom, the story of the forbidden love between the characters during the war, or wrote about the present element which included the story of three people with their own stories that has nothing to do with the past element but two key people who is involved both in the past and present element of the book. She constructed the story beautifully as she weaved all the characters stories into one. I have seen many other writers use this technique in their writing, but Pam Jenoff did it diligently. She pulled me in and kept me interested. Unfortunately, I regret to mention that the story between Charlotte and Jack was unsatisfactory. It was never formulated and the ending was hurried and abrupt. Overall, for the most part, the novel was written splendidly.more
I received this book through Early Reviewers. ~ When I read the blurb on this book, I mistakenly thought this was going to be another depressing World War 2 story, not so! I really enjoyed this story. ~ ~ Without giving too much away, the story goes back and forth present day to the 1940's. This book is packed with family secrets and a intreging story line. I raced through this book to find out the ending. Highly recommend!more
This was a well-written book and a fast read with a captivating story. In one present-day storyline, two brothers and a woman are caught up in a love triangle while defending an elderly man of World War II-era war crimes. In another storyline set in Nazi Germany, two brothers and a woman are also caught up in a love triangle. And in several other storylines, the reader peeks into various lives that were connected to an anniversary clock, which is also connected to the two love triangles. It sounds complicated, but the author pulls it off nicely, resulting in an interesting story. The only problem is that it is hard to identify with the people in the present-day love story because their story seems trite and their separation pointless when compared to the story that takes place during the horrors of World War II. Nonetheless, it is an interesting story that those who enjoy World War II fiction will surely enjoy.more
Charlotte's ex shows up out of the blue after almost a decade and asks her to drop everything, fly to Poland and help him with an important court case. Should she help the man, who broke her heart, defend an alleged WWII war criminal? Charlotte is surprised when Brian shows up in her Philadelphia office asking for her help in defending Roger Dykmans, the brother of a Holocaust hero. Did Roger turn his brother into the Nazis during the war? Why is an antique clock so important? And why did Brian ask his brother Jack, who is also a laywer, to help out on the case when the two do not get along? As a history lover, the book's settings and characters were intriguing. The book jumps throughout the past 100 years almost seemlessly- before the war, during WWII and after- leaving you to wonder how it is all going to come together; couldn't put it down until I reached the very end! I highly recommend to historical-fiction fans!more
Unputdownable! Passion, intrigue, rich historical detail--what more could you want from a summer read?!more
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Reviews

The Things We Cherished, Pam JenoffThe story really begins in Bavaria, with the seemingly innocent introduction of a handmade clock, in 1903. It is an Anniversary Clock, a unique clock that is wound only once a year, that has been built by a farmer who hopes to sell it for enough money to pay for passage to America for himself and his pregnant wife. The book then fast forwards to 2009 where we meet Charlotte, a lawyer from a modest background, daughter of a Holocaust survivor. Once very much in love, she was jilted by her boyfriend. Brian decided to get engaged to a woman who was from the same social class and more compatible to him. Instead of working as planned, with him at The Hague, she changes course and becomes a Public Defender in Philadelphia. After several years pass, Brian reappears suddenly and asks for her help. He is representing Roger Dykmans against the charge of being a Nazi collaborator responsible for sending many innocents to their deaths, including his own brother. If Brian is successful in getting him an acquittal, he is virtually guaranteed to make partner in his firm.Charlotte spent three years studying the Holocaust in Eastern Europe and is a great forensic investigator. Her mother is now dead, and all of her other close relatives died in Europe at the hands of the Nazis, so she is very much interested in the case. Although she is still smarting from the pain of her broken engagement, she consents to give Brian a week’s time, if he will help one of her clients in return. Brian believes that Charlotte will be able to discover evidence with her forensic skills and will provide a plausible defense for his client. He believes he has missed something in his own investigation, and so he agrees to her terms.Charlotte sets off for Germany, only to be stood up at the airport by Brian, who said he was unavoidably delayed, and so she is forced to travel alone. Once in Germany, she is shocked to find that it is Brian’s brother with whom she will be working in this investigation, even though the brothers are still very much estranged. Together, they travel to Poland and investigate the war years in order to try and prove Dykmans’ innocence. Dykmans, himself, is unwilling to help in the investigation to clear his name. Charlotte is often put off by Mike’s coldness and distance and an uneasy, seesaw working relationship develops. She wonders if he dislikes her and why. As their friendship grows, the development of a romance in the story feels a little bit contrived, at first, but for the most part, it comes together, in the end.As they investigate Dykmans’ past, they learn of a great secret love in his life. Between the two of them they discover many subtle subplots that intertwine, sometimes not very clearly, but they all do eventually connect and work their way into the plot and the mystery’s solution. The novel serves to explain how hard it was to survive during the war and how hard it was to help each other, even with the best of intentions, and yet, love somehow survived and thrived, lasting decades, even in the absence of hope and the loss of the loved one. It was a time when no one could be trusted and evidence was easily lost or destroyed. Happy or unhappy coincidences often meant the difference between life and death. What is it that holds the key to the puzzle of Roger’s guilt or innocence and will it be discovered in time? To find out, you must travel with Charlotte and Roger on their journey to discover the truth.more
I gave this three stars because the story about prosecuting an even very aged war criminal was a good premise.Also,the love story in it that involved not those in their 20's but slightly seasoned people in their 30's was a very believable one.I think one of the characters,Hans was based on a Raoel Wallenberg of Sweden type person. He was a diplomat who angled atgreat risk to rescue thousands of doomed Jews. I am thinking that in a non neutral country,Nazi occupied this person would not have beenallowed to run around as freely as he did. Also,I am fairly positive that his younger brother,Roger,later accused ofthe war crime would not be going to university in now German Poland as a healthy,able bodied young man in his 20's. Having thetime to romance Han's wife.He would most likely have been in the army and wound up on the Russian front.Also,the Germans would have very,very meticulous in knowing the background of this supposed diplomat'swife and her Jewishness. That said,the dates are also wrong. By 1942 no Jewish men were hanging around asynagog waiting for shul to begin. They would have been in a ghetto or transit camp at that point.I say not the usual demographic as I doubt most of her readers have read as many books on World War two as Ihave since first picking up The Diary of Anne Frank in 1963. I have also been watching shows like the TwentiethCentury with my Dad in the 60's,The World At War and The History channel for years and years.more
This book alternates between two interconnected stories. It begins with Charlotte and Jack, two attorneys who find themselves working together on the defense of Roger, a man accused of crimes during World War II. The alternate story is one of a clock, its origin, how it was passed down from person to person and then ultimately how it affects the first story.I'm not quite sure what the point of the book was. The plot was imaginative, but it didn't really work for me. The writing was well done, but the book just didn't grab me. Overall, not a home run, but I would read something else from the author.more
Loved this book! Again--a war novel set in 2009 with flashbacks to a mystery from Nazi occupied Poland and surrounding countries. Such great characters and i couldn't put it down. Definately add this to your "Must Read" list.more
Charlotte Gold, a public defender in Philly, is approached by another attorney (who happens to be her ex) to help him defend an accused WWII war criminal. Charlotte is an experience researcher and good with witnesses. Roger Dykmans, the defendant, refuses to help in his defense and she is sought out to help the situation.Enter a lot of background information on Dykmans, Charlotte and the Warrington brothers, Brian and Jack. Brian dumped Charlotte 10 years ago for another woman. Jack is high-strung and aloof. Roger Dykmans could be a monster but seems not. Each chapter goes back and forth from past to present, giving more information about the mystery surrounding Roger and the attorneys. I liked the historical references and the background on the Jewish population in Poland before the war. It's an interesting history and could have been more prevalent in the story. It was all kind of predictable. Rather short story for the kind of history that took place.more
"The Things We Cherished" is an energizing experience that speaks of two love stories and a time period prior to WWII when the world was in turmoil.Charlotte Gold and Jack Warrington team up to defend Roger Dykmans who is accused of betraying his brother, Hans, who was attempting to rescue Jewish people from Germany.Roger won't help with his defense and the attorneys go to Wadowice, Poland to learn about his background. They learn of Madga who Roger loved but was married to his brother, Hans.Back in 1940 we observe what was happening in Berlin when the Germans were rounding up Jewish people who lived in fear of betrayal and being taken away by the authorities. Roger, who was not Jewish, came to Berlin as a student, to live with Hans and Magda.The story slows down as we learn about the independent Magda who didn't want to be a captive in her own home, just because she was Jewish. With Hans gone much of the time, she and Roger become romantically involved.Both Charolotte and Jack are fully drawn charactrers of whom the reader becomes attached and wish that they will succeed in their goal and their lives.This is a heartfelt story with an ending that will remain in the memory of the reader.more
I really enjoyed this book even though it does contain that air of mystery to it. I am not particularly fond of mysteries (too many Nancy Drew in my youth, I guess), but this mystery actually kept me reading the book as I really wanted to know what secret the clock contained and what happened to Roger's lover. There is a two-fold story to the book: one story is set back in war-time 40's Europe, the other in the modern day. Seeing that I completely appreciate war time novels, I actually enjoyed the 1940's story line much more. The book does have elements of romance to it, however. I am certainly not a fan of romance novels (except Sparks') and was quite pleased to find that this book did not contain the x-rated version found so commonly in books today. People just don't have imagination anymore. The love story set back in the 40's was very appreciable as romance like that doesn't exist in this day and age, hence my aversion of modern day romance which I could have done without in the book. Give it a try if you are into historical novels set in war time Europe, but tread lightly if you are completely aversive to romances!more
Very quick read - not incredibly in depth with character or development or literary meanings, but a nice enjoyable story that makes you want to keep on reading.more
I have read a few books by Pam Jenoff and I have always been blown away by her beautiful, thoughtful writing style. That was no exception with The Things We Cherished - her writing gives the book an anchor and really underlines the high stakes that Charlotte is facing. Additionally, it highlights the importance and the tragedy of the Holocaust while softening its blow. It makes the book compulsively readable and ensures that the weighty subject matter of the book never drags the reader down.Jenoff has created some great characters in The Things We Cherished. Charlotte is very sympathetic; she is conflicted by Brian’s reappearance and enraged that he takes her for granted, yet she can’t stay away from the case. Both Brian and his brother are a little flat, but Charlotte is fully realized. The magic of the book, though, is in its historical characters. The reader only sees some of them for a few pages, yet Jenoff really breathes life into them and makes them three dimensional and very relevant for the reader.The mystery behind the war crimes was a bit of a let down and I’m not sure I could really sympathize with it, but moral ambiguity is an important part of the book. However, I could understand the overall sadness and uncertainty of the World War II time period, and thought Jenoff did an exceptional job evoking that time in history, especially with the uncertainty for Jews. The Things We Cherished deals with a very important subject matter in a manner perfect for those who choose to shy away from more difficult, depressing reads. While there is a sadness that permeates the book, it is not a gloomy read.Overall, I enjoyed The Things We Cherished and am hopeful that this might be the start to a series. I would love to read more about Charlotte’s pursual of Nazi war criminals, while also finding justice for those falsely accused. While I’m not sure that this will happen, given the ending of the book, either way, I look forward to seeing what Pam Jenoff does next.more
Charlotte Gold is happy as an attorney in the public defender’s office working with challenging juvenile cases. A very different job than the one she had as an associate at a large New York firm. She thought those days were behind her now but out of nowhere Brian, a man from the past who had broken her heart, shows up in her office to ask a favor. A wealthy client of Brian’s firm, Roger Dykmans, has been accused of WWII era crimes and he needs her to assist with the defense. Charlotte has a background in these types of cases and her expertise would be invaluable.Charlotte agrees to help with the case for one week. She arrives in Germany only to find that the client will not cooperate in his own defense other than to say the proof of his innocence lies in an antique clock. To further complicate matters the attorney that Charlotte is assisting in Germany is Brian’s brother, whom with she finds herself becoming romantically involved.In alternating chapters we go back to the turn of the century Bavaria to learn the history of the clock and it’s significance in Roger’s defense. I like the use of this technique to interweave a story from the past to the present. I found the story of the clock and it’s various owners to be more interesting than Charlotte’s story in the present.It’s not believable that Charlotte would drop everything and run off to help someone that she had not spoken to in years and when she last encountered him he was telling her to get lost and that he had replaced her with a new girlfriend. Within a short period of time he married that new girlfriend. No, that is not someone I would dash off to another continent to help. I also had trouble believing that Charlotte would fall for the brother so quickly, after all she was there to work not on a holiday.If you’re looking for a fast, light read and a fantasy romance this book would be a good choice. The tale of the clock added a mystery and there was an interesting twist with the story lines neatly tied up in the end. I don’t read a lot of romances; I picked this one up because of the historical and mystery angle. As far as the romance, if you like Danielle Steele novels you will probably love this book.more
First of all, I really liked the cover of this book! The plot seemed very interesting and as World War II is one of my favorite time periods to read about, I was very excited to read this book. However, the first time I picked this up about two and a half months ago (I won an ARC), I just could not get into the story. I recently picked it back up and found the story much more gripping this time. The mystery wove around multiple characters from multiple time periods, and it was very satisfying to see how everything came together at the end. I was disappointed with the abrupt closure to the mystery and almost felt that I had been set up for a better ending; not a different outcome necessarily, but a stronger resolution. The romance between the characters was also shallow; it did not feel real and was so on again-off again that I really could not empathize with either of them. That being said, the other characters' stories as well as the historical elements were fabulous, and I really could not wait to find out what happened to each of the historical characters.The Things We Cherished had quite a few language issues as well, more than I cared to read. That lowered the book in my opinion as well. Overall, the story was interesting but the resolution and chemistry were a little weak.more
The story line sounded so interesting, I kept thinking this book should be better than it was. Told in alternating chapters, between the past and present but the tension was missing and the romance between the two main characters just didn't sizzle, for what was supposed to be a great love.more
I was pleasantly surprised by this book. Pam Jenoff takes the reader on a journey that illuminates all of the joys and fears of the past. This novel brings to light man's ability to sacrifice everything in the face of love. Through many twists and turns, Jenoff's writing attaches the reader to the characters, allowing them to experience everything the characters experience. This novel is meant to transport you to those far away countries, and entice you to experience those places through the eyes of those of the past. It is a great novel that takes you out of your home and plants you in a world of deceit and treachery. I highly recommend this book to anyone who has a sweet tooth for historical fiction, you'll be sure to love it.more
This was a pretty good book. I won an advanced reader's edition, so there were some typos and errors, but it wasn't that bad. I liked how the chapters would switch time periods and you had to figure out how all the different characters pieced together. I didn't feel like the wrap up at the end was that great though. It seemed pretty abrupt. Although this book dealt with the Holocaust, I didn't feel like I learned a whole lot.more
The Things We Cherished is an interesting piece of historical fiction centering on a war crime committed during World War II, a crime that cost the life of the alleged war criminal’s brother, as well as the lives of several hundred Jewish children he was on the brink of saving. Now, more than six decades later, Roger Dykmans, the man accused of betraying his own brother, is refusing to defend himself against the accusations of those who believe he should be imprisoned for the remainder of his life.Charlotte Gold, a Philadelphia public defender, is startled one morning to find her longtime ex-lover waiting for her inside her drab office. Despite being a bit dismayed by both her physical and her emotional reactions to the man, Charlotte finds herself agreeing to help Brian build a defense for Roger Dykmans. However, upon her arrival in Germany to work on the case, Charlotte finds that she will be spending much more time working with Brian’s estranged brother, Jack, than she will be spending with Brian. As Charlotte and Jack begin the research that will see them searching the old man’s childhood home for evidence that would prove him innocent, the novel settles into a series of flashbacks that conclude at the time of the crime that Roger Dykmans is accused of having committed. At the heart of the story is an antique anniversary clock that changes hands every decade or two, until it rests, finally, with the Dykmans family. In separate flashbacks, we witness the clock being constructed by a simple farmer who learned the trade from his father, and follow it as it passes from one loving couple to the next for most of the next century. Ultimately, the clock will determine the fate of Roger Dykmans. The Things We Cherished, as plotted by Pam Jenoff, works; it has a story to tell, and it gets the job done. I do, however, think it would have worked even better if less attention, and fewer pages, had been given to the budding romance between Charlotte and Jack. While it is true that the modern romance uncannily mimics the World War II romance experienced by Roger Dykmans, it does little to advance the story other than to emotionally bond Charlotte to the old man. The Things We Cherished would have been a much stronger book if it had been constructed as an historical fiction novel with elements of romance thrown into the mix. As it is, it reads more like a romance novel with some historical fiction thrown in for good measure.Rated at: 3.0more
When Charlotte's ex, Brian, shows up in her office asking for help on a case, she wants to say no. She really does. Instead she finds herself in Germany working on Brian's case with Brian's brother Jack (Brian himself being unable to make it). Their client, Roger Dykmans, is accused of WWII-era war crimes, and though he refuses to cooperate with his own defense team, he insists that he is innocent. As Charlotte and Jack investigate Roger's past, they end up getting to know each other, and Charlotte begins to see Jack in ways she never expected to see an ex's sibling.Chapters alternate between Roger's life in the 1930s and earlier and Charlotte and Jack in present day, with flashes of a turn of the century clockmaker mixed in. Jenoff really managed to create atmosphere in the past stories in a way that was lacking the the present day storyline. On the other hand, the past stories weren't nearly as fleshed out as that of Charlotte and Jack. The romance in each of the storylines was convincing, complicated, and (mostly) tragic, but they all lined up a little too nicely for my taste. Once something happened in Roger's life it was easy to see how it would be replicated in Charlotte and Jack's interactions. But while the plots of the past and present stories were connected, 1930s Roger seemed to have very little to do with 2000s Roger. In the present day he is just a reason for Charlotte and Jack to flit about Europe and do some digging; he never really became a character. I get it; his life was SUPER tragic and he deserves to spend his old age locked in a shell. Still. And (not to get to spoilery) Jenoff takes an easy out of the one situation that could make past-Roger and present-Roger collide.Even so, this was a pretty enjoyable read. I just wish that when it came time for an ending, Charlotte and Jack weren't Jenoff's only concerns.Book source: ARC provided by the publisher through LibraryThing's Early Reviewer programmore
What a beautiful book! Although the end result between the hero and heroine was predictable, the seamless transitions between the time periods and the truth they reveal is pure genius. This isn't even usually a genre I enjoy but I couldn't put it down. I enjoyed how it wasn't your typical Holocaust story, but delved more into the relationship between the Jews and their non-Jewish Polish neighbors, something that isn't often touched. I hope this one is made into a movie. I'll be first in line.more
I just finished this and sadly I feel underwhelmed. I'm a fan of Pam Jenoff's books so I was expecting a lot more from The Things We Cherished, but it just never got interesting to me. There were times when I felt it was getting momentum but then it would fizzle.more
This is a story about a handmade, heirloom clock, the plight of Jews in Europe during the 1800s and 1900s, and also parallel stories of two women who fall in love with two different men who happen to be brothers. Charlotte Gold is asked by her ex-boyfriend to defend a wealthy man charged with a Nazi war crime. His brother Jack also happens to be involved in defending the man, Roger Dykmans. Roger won't tell Charlotte and Jack his side of the story, so the two lawyers begin an investigation to find out the truth of what happened over 60 years earlier. In my opinion, the premise for this book was just too ambitious. It would have been nice if it were about 200 pages longer, adding more "meat" to all of the different stories going on in the book. I could see the potential here for a great book, but that potential fizzled out fairly quickly. The mystery was wrapped up neatly and a bit too conveniently at the end. Ditto the love story. Recommended for a fast, light read but not if you're looking for a book to lose yourself in.more
This is one of those books that I could register many complaints about, and yet I still enjoyed reading it.Philadelphia public defender Charlotte Gold takes leave from her job helping juveniles to take on the defense of Roger Dykmans, an octogenarian in Germany charged as a war criminal for collaborating with the Nazis. His alleged betrayal resulted in the death of his brother Hans as well as the many Jews Hans was trying to save. Charlotte is talked into the venture by her ex-boyfriend Brian, not realizing that, in Germany, she will be working with Brian’s estranged brother Jack.As the story weaves back and forth in time, we learn what really happened with Roger and Hans, as we also watch the growing attraction between Charlotte and Jack. And tying together the two strands is the story of an old anniversary clock, passed down through the generations, and holding the key to critical events in the lives of the protagonists.Discussion: I liked this book and sped right through it. But it’s not as polished as I hoped. The parallel love stories that take place in the past and the present, and the heirloom that passes along through the generations and draws the characters together are both overused plot devices. And neither one is developed in a way innovative enough to justify yet another rendition. A lot of the background information given on the Holocaust is delivered didactically, and should have been more smoothly integrated into the story. Some of the characters are improbably or irritatingly clueless in matters of the heart. Brian and Jack, both supposedly top-flight lawyers, often seem like amateurs, especially with respect to dealing with witnesses and evidence.Last but not least, the outcome was as predictable as could be.So why did I like it? Even a hackneyed plot is enough for me for a story that (a) deals with the moral complexities of war crimes; (b) features legal procedural elements; (c) includes a romance; and (d) has some nuance in at least some of the characters. But more than that: war adds poignancy and drama to stories; it provides swelling background music. It lends life or death urgency to the most mundane activities. The farther we are from the actual impact of fighting and death, the more we find war to be romantic. And even if it is close to us, we know that no other experience in life can match it for intensity. Thus the most hackneyed ideas can be immeasurably enhanced, and we may even superimpose our own knowledge of the setting to reinforce that which is provided by the author.Do I recommend this book? Yes. I would actually compare it in a way with “The Postmistress.” I had a lot of complaints about that book as well, but it had similar elements that induced me to like it in any event. And if you don’t know a lot about what it was like to live in Germany during WWII, this story is very helpful in that regard.more
What if you are forced with the choice of making the worst possible choice for the best possible reason? The Things We Cherished is a novel which explores this dilemma through interweaving tales. The central story revolves around the defense of Roger Dykmans, a wealthy Polish financier, and brother of a resistance hero, who has been charged with war crimes. Though Roger refuses to help in his own defense, Charley and Jack Warrington begin to delve into his past to unravel the mystery. In doing so, they also unravel their own past, for Jack is the estranged brother of Charley's ex-fiance. As the modern day story begins to heat up, the back story starting in Poland in the early 1900's also expands. The action, past and present, travels thorough Germany, Poland and Italy, as the quest to find the reasons behind Roger's actions unfold. The book held my interest, because of the backstories mostly, despite a few complaints I might have about character development.On a personal level there were a couple of interesting tidbits in this novel. One is that my husband and I were given an Anniversary Clock much like the one Johann created, as a wedding gift. I was fascinated to learn more about the history of these clocks, and even more determined to get ours working again. It went on the fritz a few years ago after 25 years of marriage, though the marriage is still going strong.The other bit that was incredibly fascinating to me is that I became quite familiar with the area of Berlin that features in several of the back-story spots. The New synagog and the Jewish Quarter of Mitte -- even one of the spots in the story, in a Berlin segment, during WWII, has been turned into a hotel. It is this hotel that we stayed in, on Rosenthaler Platz, when we visited Berlin last spring. The story of the family who'd had a shop and home there before and during the war was documented in the hotel. I could picture Rosenthaler Strasse in my mind when reading that section of the book.more
While helping to defend Roger Dykmans, for the possible betrayal of his brother Hans during WWII, resulting in the murder of Hans and the Jewish children he tried to save, Charlotte Gold, currently a Philadelphia defense lawyer, finds herself in an emotional quandary. Jack Warrington is the first lawyer on the case. Charlotte had dated and loved Brian, Jack's younger brother, who left her for Danielle, now his wife. Their investigation turns up information about Hans' Jewish wife, Magda, providing a key reason Roger will not defend himself. Because Charlotte cares about people, she is motivated to connect the dots of Hans', Roger's and Magda's lives during such dreadful, dangerous times to learn the truth. A major theme running throughout the novel is brothers. A man who saves his brother's life, another who hurts his brother profoundly, and brothers who simply are very different and don't get along. I understand that Jenoff was trying to show various fraternal relationships throughout time. But the squabbling, competitiveness, and argumentativeness between Brian and Jack is distracting, and only acts to detract from the flow and importance of the main story. Also, the timing of the call Jack receives which puts the last puzzle piece in place, conveniently solving the "mystery" is tired and contrived. It should have come a year or years later. I think this novel has much unrealized potential.more
Pam Jenoff wrote a very moving and pulling novel. It was written very well. There were two major categories: the past and the present. I loved the way she pieced together the story like a puzzle. She either wrote about the historical element of the novel which included the story of the clockmaker, the history of the family heirloom, the story of the forbidden love between the characters during the war, or wrote about the present element which included the story of three people with their own stories that has nothing to do with the past element but two key people who is involved both in the past and present element of the book. She constructed the story beautifully as she weaved all the characters stories into one. I have seen many other writers use this technique in their writing, but Pam Jenoff did it diligently. She pulled me in and kept me interested. Unfortunately, I regret to mention that the story between Charlotte and Jack was unsatisfactory. It was never formulated and the ending was hurried and abrupt. Overall, for the most part, the novel was written splendidly.more
I received this book through Early Reviewers. ~ When I read the blurb on this book, I mistakenly thought this was going to be another depressing World War 2 story, not so! I really enjoyed this story. ~ ~ Without giving too much away, the story goes back and forth present day to the 1940's. This book is packed with family secrets and a intreging story line. I raced through this book to find out the ending. Highly recommend!more
This was a well-written book and a fast read with a captivating story. In one present-day storyline, two brothers and a woman are caught up in a love triangle while defending an elderly man of World War II-era war crimes. In another storyline set in Nazi Germany, two brothers and a woman are also caught up in a love triangle. And in several other storylines, the reader peeks into various lives that were connected to an anniversary clock, which is also connected to the two love triangles. It sounds complicated, but the author pulls it off nicely, resulting in an interesting story. The only problem is that it is hard to identify with the people in the present-day love story because their story seems trite and their separation pointless when compared to the story that takes place during the horrors of World War II. Nonetheless, it is an interesting story that those who enjoy World War II fiction will surely enjoy.more
Charlotte's ex shows up out of the blue after almost a decade and asks her to drop everything, fly to Poland and help him with an important court case. Should she help the man, who broke her heart, defend an alleged WWII war criminal? Charlotte is surprised when Brian shows up in her Philadelphia office asking for her help in defending Roger Dykmans, the brother of a Holocaust hero. Did Roger turn his brother into the Nazis during the war? Why is an antique clock so important? And why did Brian ask his brother Jack, who is also a laywer, to help out on the case when the two do not get along? As a history lover, the book's settings and characters were intriguing. The book jumps throughout the past 100 years almost seemlessly- before the war, during WWII and after- leaving you to wonder how it is all going to come together; couldn't put it down until I reached the very end! I highly recommend to historical-fiction fans!more
Unputdownable! Passion, intrigue, rich historical detail--what more could you want from a summer read?!more
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