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In her sizzling, award-winning novels of suspense, bestselling author Suzanne Brockmann delves into the adrenaline-rushed world of counter terrorism–and taps into the real passions of its brave men and women. Now in her widely anticipated hardcover debut, she spins a story of action, intrigue, and romance, as a U.S. Navy SEAL and an FBI agent race to unravel a mystery–while confronting their own unresolved feelings for each other. . . .

In his career as one of America’s elite warriors, Lt. Sam Starrett can do no wrong. In his private life, Sam–the king of one night stands–has done little right. Now, he’s waiting for a divorce and determined to stay active in his young daughter’s life. But when Sam shows up at the door of his ex-wife’s home in Sarasota, Florida, he makes a grisly discovery. His daughter is gone and the body of a woman lies brutally murdered on the floor.

FBI agent Alyssa Locke’s relationship with Sam has been overwhelmingly intense and nearly catastrophic, yet it refuses to end. The last time she saw Sam was six months earlier, when they worked together to stop terrorists from assassinating the U.S. President. Much to her dismay, Alyssa is assigned to lead the murder investigation and once again the two are face to face. When explosive information surfaces linking Sam to the still unsolved assassination plot, the stakes are raised. With her reputation hanging in the balance, and her loyalties in question, Alyssa is faced with an impossible dilemma:arrest a man she believes to be innocent, or risk her career.

While Alyssa tries to fight their intense attraction, Sam is determined to heat things up between them once again. And the complex case pushes them both to the wrong side of the law–and on the run to discover the truth. As more agents step into the chase, and with Sam’s daughter still unaccounted for, neither Alyssa nor Sam can predict just how deadly hot this situation is about to become. . . .

A thrilling novel that ranges back into the days of World War II, into friendships, families, liaisons, betrayals, and the code of honor that binds the U.S. Navy SEALs, Gone Too Far is an electrifying experience in suspense–and a brilliant tale of lives lived on the edge.


From the Hardcover edition.
Published: Random House Publishing Group an imprint of Random House Publishing Group on
ISBN: 9780345464361
List price: $7.99
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Gone Too FarBook 6 in Troubleshooters seriesSam Starrett & Alyssa Locke - These two have been important secondary players in the previous books. Their history is full of fighting and hiding their true feelings from each other. They had finally reached a point where they were admitting how they felt about each other when Sam finds out a former girlfriend (Mary Lou) was pregnant, so he married her "to do the right thing". Fast forward a couple years through a miserable marriage and they are at the breaking point. This book picks up six months after Mary Lou's departure (with their daughter, Haley) to Florida to stay with her sister. After several weeks of no return phone calls from Mary Lou, Sam heads to Florida to make sure Mary Lou signs the divorce papers and get them filed. When he arrives at her home, he is devastated to find a corpse (whom he believes is Mary Lou) but no sign of Haley. This starts accusations flying about Sam's involvement in her murder and he eventually calls on Alyssa Locke for help. This starts off rocky because Alyssa, unfortunately, makes the incorrect assumption at first that Sam shot Mary Lou. I'm not sure how he gets over that one, but I guess love is definitely blind. At the same time, Sam's CO, Tom Paoletti, is being questioned for the events surrounding the botched assassination attempt on the President six months ago. He is being accused of smuggling the weapons used onto the base, as well as acquiring those weapons in an earlier mission in which they were allegedly on board a crashed helo that had to be scuttled by Tom's SEAL Team 16. It is obvious he and his team are either being framed or just being used as scapegoats to satisfy the powers that be.Mary Lou is a major player in this story as she is actually in hiding from Bob Schwegel, the man posing as an insurance salesman, who was actually involved in the attack on the President. She had discovered that Bob had used her car as the means for smuggling the weapons onto the Naval base. She also saw him near her sister's home and was able to get away before he killed her. She never called the police or the FBI or even Sam (her husband & SEAL team member) for help because she was afraid she would be arrested for being part of the plot.Max Baghat & Gina Vitagliano - These two finally meet back up when Max heads to Florida to help in the search for Mary Lou. Max has been trying for a couple years to stay away from Gina because he is worried about their age difference (around 20 years) and the fact that she may just think she cares for him because of transference. He knows how he feels about her, but he's not sure he wouldn't be taking advantage of her vulnerability. He was the hostage negotiator who helped get her out of a terrorist hijacking alive--although not undamaged by her captors. He also, naturally, feels a lot of guilt and self-blame for what had happened to her, although she doesn't see it that way at all. She knows those events could not be stopped by him and she truly believes he is the reason she got out of there alive.WWII story - Involves Sam's adopted father figure, his Uncle Walter Gaines, who was a member of the Tuskegee Airmen, and Dorothy "Dot" Smith, a member of the WASPs (Women Airforce Service Pilots). Both of these characters had already passed away but their story was told through memories and letters they had written each other during the War before they were married. Their story was an important one revolving around their mixed marriage and dealing with racism. They showed Sam what unconditional love was for the first time in his life and helped turn his life around, giving him a home and helping protect him from his abusive father and neglectful mother. The WWII-era story tied in with the contemporary story and it's different examples of racist attitudes, racial profiling, homophobic attitudes, bullying, fear and ignorance. A quote from a letter Walter had written Dot during the War states, "I don't understand such thinking. If it's not race, it's religion. I don't understand why people look for each other's differences, instead of the ways in which we are all the same."more
After the shooting at the navy base when the President came to visit, the life of Roger "Sam" Starrett turned around: his wife left him and took their daughter with her. Now, finally putting an end to a miserable marriage, Sam tracks down Mary Lou only to find her dead. However, things got a little out of hand when Lt. Tom Paoletti is arrested and questioned for treason; Sam then turns to the only person that can help him: Alyssa Locke. This is my favorite one of the series. It is impossible not to like Sam Starrett or not to feel a like sorrow for him and his life. This is an important book to read not only because this is the beginning of the Troubleshooters but also because with this book, a cycle ends and all the people that we "heard" about are going to be more developed and we get to know them a little better.more
Wow. This one was a non-stop rollercoaster ride of a book! All the major plot points left somewhat dangling from the last Troubleshooters book (and a few from some earlier ones) were resolved, and a whole lot of things finally came together. The WWII-era story this time dealt with two groups who don't get nearly enough recognition--the Women Airforce Service Pilots and the Tuskegee Airmen--nice touch; I really like how each book in the series features a story from that era yet they are all so different. Gone Too Far has a bit of a bittersweet ending--some situations had gone too far (pun not *entirely* intended) for them to go back to normal, but there is still hope for the future in the end. I'm anxiously awaiting my next Audible credits so I can download book seven!more
I violated one of my cardinal rules, and started a new author and series smack dab in the middle. I'd heard good things about Suzanne Brockmann, so picked up this book when I passed it - despite it's middle of the pack publication.



Brockmann is a good writer. There were lovely character descriptions, and some wonderful stories. Unfortunately the main plot was far less interesting than the subplot told in flashbacks. Now, I'm going to start from book one just so I can figure out what I missed with all the side characters.



Although I hate mid series books that rehash all that a careful series reader should know - this didn't have the stand alone quality I would have liked.more
Read all 11 reviews

Reviews

Gone Too FarBook 6 in Troubleshooters seriesSam Starrett & Alyssa Locke - These two have been important secondary players in the previous books. Their history is full of fighting and hiding their true feelings from each other. They had finally reached a point where they were admitting how they felt about each other when Sam finds out a former girlfriend (Mary Lou) was pregnant, so he married her "to do the right thing". Fast forward a couple years through a miserable marriage and they are at the breaking point. This book picks up six months after Mary Lou's departure (with their daughter, Haley) to Florida to stay with her sister. After several weeks of no return phone calls from Mary Lou, Sam heads to Florida to make sure Mary Lou signs the divorce papers and get them filed. When he arrives at her home, he is devastated to find a corpse (whom he believes is Mary Lou) but no sign of Haley. This starts accusations flying about Sam's involvement in her murder and he eventually calls on Alyssa Locke for help. This starts off rocky because Alyssa, unfortunately, makes the incorrect assumption at first that Sam shot Mary Lou. I'm not sure how he gets over that one, but I guess love is definitely blind. At the same time, Sam's CO, Tom Paoletti, is being questioned for the events surrounding the botched assassination attempt on the President six months ago. He is being accused of smuggling the weapons used onto the base, as well as acquiring those weapons in an earlier mission in which they were allegedly on board a crashed helo that had to be scuttled by Tom's SEAL Team 16. It is obvious he and his team are either being framed or just being used as scapegoats to satisfy the powers that be.Mary Lou is a major player in this story as she is actually in hiding from Bob Schwegel, the man posing as an insurance salesman, who was actually involved in the attack on the President. She had discovered that Bob had used her car as the means for smuggling the weapons onto the Naval base. She also saw him near her sister's home and was able to get away before he killed her. She never called the police or the FBI or even Sam (her husband & SEAL team member) for help because she was afraid she would be arrested for being part of the plot.Max Baghat & Gina Vitagliano - These two finally meet back up when Max heads to Florida to help in the search for Mary Lou. Max has been trying for a couple years to stay away from Gina because he is worried about their age difference (around 20 years) and the fact that she may just think she cares for him because of transference. He knows how he feels about her, but he's not sure he wouldn't be taking advantage of her vulnerability. He was the hostage negotiator who helped get her out of a terrorist hijacking alive--although not undamaged by her captors. He also, naturally, feels a lot of guilt and self-blame for what had happened to her, although she doesn't see it that way at all. She knows those events could not be stopped by him and she truly believes he is the reason she got out of there alive.WWII story - Involves Sam's adopted father figure, his Uncle Walter Gaines, who was a member of the Tuskegee Airmen, and Dorothy "Dot" Smith, a member of the WASPs (Women Airforce Service Pilots). Both of these characters had already passed away but their story was told through memories and letters they had written each other during the War before they were married. Their story was an important one revolving around their mixed marriage and dealing with racism. They showed Sam what unconditional love was for the first time in his life and helped turn his life around, giving him a home and helping protect him from his abusive father and neglectful mother. The WWII-era story tied in with the contemporary story and it's different examples of racist attitudes, racial profiling, homophobic attitudes, bullying, fear and ignorance. A quote from a letter Walter had written Dot during the War states, "I don't understand such thinking. If it's not race, it's religion. I don't understand why people look for each other's differences, instead of the ways in which we are all the same."more
After the shooting at the navy base when the President came to visit, the life of Roger "Sam" Starrett turned around: his wife left him and took their daughter with her. Now, finally putting an end to a miserable marriage, Sam tracks down Mary Lou only to find her dead. However, things got a little out of hand when Lt. Tom Paoletti is arrested and questioned for treason; Sam then turns to the only person that can help him: Alyssa Locke. This is my favorite one of the series. It is impossible not to like Sam Starrett or not to feel a like sorrow for him and his life. This is an important book to read not only because this is the beginning of the Troubleshooters but also because with this book, a cycle ends and all the people that we "heard" about are going to be more developed and we get to know them a little better.more
Wow. This one was a non-stop rollercoaster ride of a book! All the major plot points left somewhat dangling from the last Troubleshooters book (and a few from some earlier ones) were resolved, and a whole lot of things finally came together. The WWII-era story this time dealt with two groups who don't get nearly enough recognition--the Women Airforce Service Pilots and the Tuskegee Airmen--nice touch; I really like how each book in the series features a story from that era yet they are all so different. Gone Too Far has a bit of a bittersweet ending--some situations had gone too far (pun not *entirely* intended) for them to go back to normal, but there is still hope for the future in the end. I'm anxiously awaiting my next Audible credits so I can download book seven!more
I violated one of my cardinal rules, and started a new author and series smack dab in the middle. I'd heard good things about Suzanne Brockmann, so picked up this book when I passed it - despite it's middle of the pack publication.



Brockmann is a good writer. There were lovely character descriptions, and some wonderful stories. Unfortunately the main plot was far less interesting than the subplot told in flashbacks. Now, I'm going to start from book one just so I can figure out what I missed with all the side characters.



Although I hate mid series books that rehash all that a careful series reader should know - this didn't have the stand alone quality I would have liked.more
Okay. If this review was just of the heroine it would struggle to even get one star. But Sam - oh Sam - I was ambivalent towards him until this book, but now I love him. On top of that, my beloved Max and Gina are back, and Tom and Kelly - characters I didn’t much care for before - were great. This book signals the beginning of the end for many characters - after this one a whole lot of people are going to lose their careers, and I’m not sure I liked that. The series is moving into a new stage, but I liked what it was before. I came into this one desperately wanting to like it more. I knew it would be a struggle - the ‘Ice Bitch’ ‘heroine’ is a nasty, self-serving piece of work, and it would have taken nothing short of a miracle for me to care about her happy ending. Navy SEAL Sam’s estranged wife and his daughter have disappeared. When he goes to their house to track down the divorce papers he instead finds a murder scene. Alyssa - the supposed love of his life - is an FBI agent who is sent there to deal with the case. All this would be bad enough, but another member of Sam’s team has just been wrongfully accused of playing a part in a terrorist attack on home soil. All of this combined is starting to look like someone wants to frame SEAL Team Sixteen. There are a whole lot of other side stories going on too - when I say don’t start the series here, I’m really serious!! The main relationship (or non-relationship as it’s been most of the time) has been going for six books, and the terrorist attack the story revolves around took place in the previous book. The secondary story involving Max and Gina began three books ago. You might be able to catch up on what’s going on but the emotional impact of it is going to be nonexistent unless you’ve already been through the dramas with the characters. I have a lot of negative things to say about this book, but I did absolutely love how everything came together at the end. All these seemingly separate storylines were pulled together in such a complex way. Sam’s childhood parts were very moving. There were so many little moments in the book that were brilliantly done. It was whenever we came back to Alyssa that I remembered what I didn’t like about the story. At the beginning of this book when Sam discovers what he thinks is his estranged wife’s dead body he calls the FBI for help and ends up talking to Alyssa. And what does she do? She immediately assumes Sam is the murderer. I couldn’t believe it. Then - when I thought she couldn’t get any worse - she is stupid and selfish enough to believe she can make out with Sam a bit and he’ll choose to NOT go looking for his missing daughter - because, you know, she’s so fantastic he’ll choose cheap sex in the back of a car over the life of his daughter. Nasty, horrible, self-absorbed woman. I don’t think Alyssa would have the fan following she has if she wasn’t paired with Sam. On her own she’s not worth the effort. In fact she’s my least favourite character in this entire gigantic cast of Troubleshooters characters. She’s never nice. Never. She's a Mary Sue - from an author who I didn’t think could ever write one. She stands up as a platform for all of the issues Suzanne Brockmann likes writing about. She’s mixed-race - apparently some mix of exotic races that basically make her the most beautiful woman in the world or something. She has a gay best friend. She’s making it big in a man’s world. She is a big enough person to let the love of her life walk away, for the sake of others. She even gets a couple of Brockmann’s beloved pregnancy scares. She’s benevolent and beautiful and talented at everything she does, and every person - male, female, young, old, bad, good - they all love her and think she’s superior and fantastic. The woman's only flaw appears to be that she wears a bum bag (fanny pack - I’m sorry, but that term’s just too rude!). And yet she’s always cold and even nasty, especially when it comes to Sam. Sam - who I came close to hating in the last book - redeemed himself here in a major way. On top of showing us more about why he was so depressed and why he did certain things, we also got to see how smart he is and how good he is at his job. If only he’d been given a woman capable of loving him as much as he loves her. One thing against Sam though - it was absolutely not fair that he told Alyssa not to take a morning after pill, comparing it having an abortion. That made me so angry. Maybe Alyssa should just ditch the contraception altogether and spend the rest of her life pregnant and giving birth. Because, yeah, that sounds like a whole heap of fun. It was such a sexist thing to say. The main theme of the book is interracial relationships, but it was done with absolute overkill, and came across as preaching (particularly as Brockmann included an entire 1940s civil rights side story). I do not have a problem with these issues being raised in a book, but I have a major problem with an author who seems only able to get their point across by on one hand demonising certain characters, and then giving us tolerance overload on the other. We had Sam and Alyssa, Mary Lou and Ibrahim, Walter and Dot, Max and Gina (to an extent), and Sam and Noah’s friendship. Instead of the relationships being about people caring for each other, all we heard about were the characters’ differences in race. The 1940s storyline was complete overkill - with the murder and terrorism and romance and Navy and mystery themes it was far too much and detracted from the story. I am not very happy about the end of so many characters’ careers as we know them. I like a Navy SEALs series to be about Navy SEALs, and the SEALs were not the only people giving up jobs in this one. It is clear the series is going to head in a completely different direction now, and I’m not sure I’m happy with that. There were a few things that perplexed me about this book. It was very full of many secondary stories, but where were Joan and Mike?! The heroine and hero of the last book should have been in this book - something major happens involving someone in their family, and they weren’t there. I don’t care how overcrowded the story already was. The World War Two stuff should have been taken out then. It had nothing to do with the plot, whereas Joan and Mike did. Mary Lou is still an idiot. It annoys me that so many people are in trouble and so many lives are being ruined throughout not only this book but the one that preceded it solely because Mary Lou chose not to report a gun she found in her car. If it weren’t for her caginess and her stupidity things would have turned out so much better for so many people. And I still can’t forgive her for lying to force Sam into marriage. That said, she does have some redeeming features here, and she is coming into her own as a character. I’m not sure why Max has so many reservations about his age difference with Gina when he doesn’t have the same dilemma with Alyssa, who’s not that much older than her. Maybe it’s because Alyssa is ‘perfect’ in every way there is, so nobody has any reservations about her... Grrr... But the Max and Gina story is interesting. Max was helpless to do anything when Gina for was raped by terrorists. It’s tragic and frightening, and such an incredible story for these two characters. Tom and Kelly were just okay in their own book, but I liked them in this one. I also liked the few tiny glimpses of the camaraderie between the SEALs, but there wasn't much of it. This book has to be read if you're a fan of the series, and there are some things about it that are amazing. I guess it would have been a MUCH better read for me if I cared about the heroine, because unfortunately she was the book’s undoing.more
Gone Too Far was the first book that I have read by Suzanne Brockmann. At first the book wasn't catching my attention. I have actually put the book to the side for weeks. One day, I have picked it back up and starting reading it again. When, I have came to the knowledge that the woman that Sam was interested in was black. The book has caught my attention and kept it. The part where I have stopped reading the book was after Mr. Gaines have came to school and picked up Noah and Sam from school. So, of course I didn't know that this book was an interracial book. I have never read Suzanne before, never even been to her site. I have to say that I was happy that Sam and Alyssa gotten HEA in this book. I was also happy to see that Sam had a black best friend, who happen to be his cousin and that they looked alike. You don't find too many books, where their is a interracial hero best friend pairing. The book is a good read. I have fell in love with Sam.more
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