Sixteen-year-old Dani is convinced she has nine lives. As a child she twice walked away from situations where she should have died. But Dani’s twin, Jena, isn’t so lucky.  She has cancer and might not even be able to keep her one life. Dani’s father is in denial. Her mother is trying to hold it together and prove everything’s normal.  And Jena is wasting away.  To cope, Dani sets out to rid herself of all her extra lives.  Maybe they’ll be released into the universe and someone who wants to live more than she does will get one.  Someone like Jena.  But just when Dani finds herself at the breaking point, she’s faced with a startling realization.  Maybe she doesn’t have nine lives after all.  Maybe she really only ever had one.
Published: Macmillan Publishers on Jun 5, 2012
Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
Availability for All These Lives
Available for free
  1. This book can be read on up to 6 mobile devices.
Clear rating

This book is loaded with emotional cliffs and we drop off more than one as we navigate, for a brief time, in the life of Dani Bailey's complicated and decidedly depressing life. Not that Dani does anything to make it better. But her twin, her other half, the one who knows her best, the one who she promised when she was six and had the chicken pox that she would die for her, is dying right before her eyes and she can't stop it. But she has this odd theory that she has nine lives from something her mother told her when she survived a car crash when she was little. And she thinks when Jena is at her worst, if she gives up one of those lives, then Jena will feel well. And so she goes from one suicide attempt to another without anyone really understanding what is happening. Except for Jack.Dani and Jack have known each other since kindergarten and apparently Dani has been bullying Jack verbally since then. She loves to tease him and make him blush. But now that things have changed in her life, the stakes are higher and suddenly Jack is talking back. Somehow he knows what's going on and like everyone else, she uses her humor as a defense to push him away. Dani has essentially become a stranger to herself. She doesn't know who she is without Jena and she's so afraid that Jena is going to die that instead of savoring her moments with her, she pushes her away and stays away as much as possible. But to think "I will go on existing without her. Wear dresses she has never seen. One birthday cake instead of two. The thought is so absurd that I almost burst out laughing." That's what she thinks as tears roll down my cheeks. Dani's parents make her start seeing a therapist after she crashes a motorcycle and she's still denying herself any help. If they could only see what we could see, they would put her on 24 hour lock down, and I'm not one to kid about that. She is a danger to herself always. Her biggest fear is being left alone without her twin. Seeing that empty chair at the table for four. Being the one left behind. Some of the last pages are the most profound in the story which I can't share of course. But it makes me wonder who is more scared, the person dying or the ones left behind?Dani does crash land literally. And she has to decide is she going to quit before she even knows if her sister makes it through the cancer? Or is she going to live the life she's been given, considering she's wasting the one she'd do anything to give to her sister, which is impossible. She has a wicked sense of humor, which she keeps despite everything, but I think I'd be exhausted keeping everyone in my life at arm's length. And in the end, she finds out she isn't as enigmatic as she thought.I'd definitely recommend this for YA readers that can handle death and suicide. It's heavy on both.I received a copy of this from MacMillan Children's Publishing through NetGalley for review. The opinions expressed are my own. I was not compensated for my review.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
You should all know by now that I am a sucker for a good contemporary. The more it makes me cry, the higher it goes on my list of favorites. But I don't like them all. Because these stories are realistic and I can't rely on hot vampires or thrilling action scenes to get me through, it has to be a story that sucks me in. It has to be about a character whose story I can't stop thinking about when I'm not reading. All These Lives did just that. I'd picked up a few other review books prior to grabbing this one and they all failed to hold my attention until I got to Dani. She's got this rough exterior that made me want to crack it, so I could look inside and see all the broken little pieces she was trying so hard to hide. She also has a tremendous amount of love for her twin sister and this struck a nerve in the sister center of my brain. I have many sisters. I couldn't begin to think about living without even one of them. So, it was easy for me to sympathize with Dani's situation. She doesn't know how to deal with a sick sister so she avoids her. But more than anything she wants Jena to just be okay again. Throw in the fact that Dani has had a few run-ins with death and cheated him, and you've got yourself a confused little girl who thinks she can transfer some of her extra lives to her sister. Realistic and vivid, All These Lives is an emotional, heartfelt tale of two sisters in an excruciating situation. It broke my heart a little bit but I really enjoyed it. It's easy to read the synopsis and classify this as a "cancer book" but it's not. It's not out to manipulate emotions or to force sympathy. It's more about Dani coming to terms with being very much alive than it is about Jena's illness. In the end, it's about life, not death.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
How would you react if you found out a loved one was facing a battle against cancer? Would you deny the possible and pretend nothing has changed? Would you immerse yourself into the physician's recommended regime to optimize the impact of the medicines? Would you distance yourself against the inevitable? When faced with the potential death of a loved one, everyone reacts differently. All These Lives is a poignant and amazing look into one family's struggle with the news that every family hopes never to hear.Dani is one heroine with whom all readers will empathize. Her pain is physically palpable. Incredibly, Ms. Wylie uses a dearth of words to create this effect, but she does so with tremendous success. Dani is so convinced that she has nine lives that a reader is never completely sure whether it is a figment of her imagination or not. To say that All These Lives packs an emotional powerhouse is an understatement of the highest magnitude.All These Lives is a gut-wrenching look at sisterhood and family and the impact of terminal illness on these relationships. Ms. Wylie captures the trauma involved and the various coping mechanisms with perfection. As a result, the reader is taken on an emotional roller coaster as they navigate through Dani's multiple and conflicting emotions at the possible loss of her sister. It is an amazingly powerful story that lingers with the reader well after the last page.Acknowledgments: Thank you to NetGalley and Macmillan Children's Publishing Group for my e-galley!read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Read all reviews

Reviews

This book is loaded with emotional cliffs and we drop off more than one as we navigate, for a brief time, in the life of Dani Bailey's complicated and decidedly depressing life. Not that Dani does anything to make it better. But her twin, her other half, the one who knows her best, the one who she promised when she was six and had the chicken pox that she would die for her, is dying right before her eyes and she can't stop it. But she has this odd theory that she has nine lives from something her mother told her when she survived a car crash when she was little. And she thinks when Jena is at her worst, if she gives up one of those lives, then Jena will feel well. And so she goes from one suicide attempt to another without anyone really understanding what is happening. Except for Jack.Dani and Jack have known each other since kindergarten and apparently Dani has been bullying Jack verbally since then. She loves to tease him and make him blush. But now that things have changed in her life, the stakes are higher and suddenly Jack is talking back. Somehow he knows what's going on and like everyone else, she uses her humor as a defense to push him away. Dani has essentially become a stranger to herself. She doesn't know who she is without Jena and she's so afraid that Jena is going to die that instead of savoring her moments with her, she pushes her away and stays away as much as possible. But to think "I will go on existing without her. Wear dresses she has never seen. One birthday cake instead of two. The thought is so absurd that I almost burst out laughing." That's what she thinks as tears roll down my cheeks. Dani's parents make her start seeing a therapist after she crashes a motorcycle and she's still denying herself any help. If they could only see what we could see, they would put her on 24 hour lock down, and I'm not one to kid about that. She is a danger to herself always. Her biggest fear is being left alone without her twin. Seeing that empty chair at the table for four. Being the one left behind. Some of the last pages are the most profound in the story which I can't share of course. But it makes me wonder who is more scared, the person dying or the ones left behind?Dani does crash land literally. And she has to decide is she going to quit before she even knows if her sister makes it through the cancer? Or is she going to live the life she's been given, considering she's wasting the one she'd do anything to give to her sister, which is impossible. She has a wicked sense of humor, which she keeps despite everything, but I think I'd be exhausted keeping everyone in my life at arm's length. And in the end, she finds out she isn't as enigmatic as she thought.I'd definitely recommend this for YA readers that can handle death and suicide. It's heavy on both.I received a copy of this from MacMillan Children's Publishing through NetGalley for review. The opinions expressed are my own. I was not compensated for my review.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
You should all know by now that I am a sucker for a good contemporary. The more it makes me cry, the higher it goes on my list of favorites. But I don't like them all. Because these stories are realistic and I can't rely on hot vampires or thrilling action scenes to get me through, it has to be a story that sucks me in. It has to be about a character whose story I can't stop thinking about when I'm not reading. All These Lives did just that. I'd picked up a few other review books prior to grabbing this one and they all failed to hold my attention until I got to Dani. She's got this rough exterior that made me want to crack it, so I could look inside and see all the broken little pieces she was trying so hard to hide. She also has a tremendous amount of love for her twin sister and this struck a nerve in the sister center of my brain. I have many sisters. I couldn't begin to think about living without even one of them. So, it was easy for me to sympathize with Dani's situation. She doesn't know how to deal with a sick sister so she avoids her. But more than anything she wants Jena to just be okay again. Throw in the fact that Dani has had a few run-ins with death and cheated him, and you've got yourself a confused little girl who thinks she can transfer some of her extra lives to her sister. Realistic and vivid, All These Lives is an emotional, heartfelt tale of two sisters in an excruciating situation. It broke my heart a little bit but I really enjoyed it. It's easy to read the synopsis and classify this as a "cancer book" but it's not. It's not out to manipulate emotions or to force sympathy. It's more about Dani coming to terms with being very much alive than it is about Jena's illness. In the end, it's about life, not death.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
How would you react if you found out a loved one was facing a battle against cancer? Would you deny the possible and pretend nothing has changed? Would you immerse yourself into the physician's recommended regime to optimize the impact of the medicines? Would you distance yourself against the inevitable? When faced with the potential death of a loved one, everyone reacts differently. All These Lives is a poignant and amazing look into one family's struggle with the news that every family hopes never to hear.Dani is one heroine with whom all readers will empathize. Her pain is physically palpable. Incredibly, Ms. Wylie uses a dearth of words to create this effect, but she does so with tremendous success. Dani is so convinced that she has nine lives that a reader is never completely sure whether it is a figment of her imagination or not. To say that All These Lives packs an emotional powerhouse is an understatement of the highest magnitude.All These Lives is a gut-wrenching look at sisterhood and family and the impact of terminal illness on these relationships. Ms. Wylie captures the trauma involved and the various coping mechanisms with perfection. As a result, the reader is taken on an emotional roller coaster as they navigate through Dani's multiple and conflicting emotions at the possible loss of her sister. It is an amazingly powerful story that lingers with the reader well after the last page.Acknowledgments: Thank you to NetGalley and Macmillan Children's Publishing Group for my e-galley!
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
I love stories about sisters. As a person who both is a sister and has a sister, there's something I can relate to in books about sister-sister relationships. ALL THESE LIVES is absolutely a sister story -- but it's also gripping, romantic, tragic, and chilling.In ALL THESE LIVES by Sarah Wylie, sixteen-year-old Dani is super close to her fraternal twin Jena. Dani's mother has always joked that she had nine lives. She's survived twice when she shouldn't have, which makes her wonder if her mother's sentiment is more than just a sweet joke. Maybe it's true. Which is totally unfair, because while Dani is healthy, even landing auditions as an aspiring actress, her sister Jena has leukemia. The only thing that can save Jena -- whose medicine has made her so sick she can't go to school -- is a bone marrow transplant, and Dani isn't a match. She feels helpless. Until she realizes that every time she gets into a scrape -- and survives -- Jena gets a little better.What starts as an experiment to help her sister quickly becomes a whole new level of self-destructive. Dani has reached a breaking point, and will seemingly stop at nothing to save her sister, even if it means destroying herself.ALL THESE LIVES is wrought with suspense and rich with atmosphere. It's a great novel for those who, like me, love sister books and also for those who, um, also like me, read every Lurlene McDaniel ever in 7th grade. ALL THESE LIVES is a page turner, and Dani's voice is expertly written. Definitely one to check out on a rainy summer night.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
If you’re into sad books, this is a good one to read. There is a lot of sarcastic humor that the main character brings to the book as well though. Which take away from the sadness in just the right amount the ending does kind of leave you questioning though. The back of the book appealed to me so I picked it up.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Wow! What a powerful book. I must admit that I was a little thrown by the “nine lives” reference in the summary. I guess maybe I expected a touch of paranormal, or maybe magical realism here, kind of like Nova Ren Suma’s “Imaginary Girls”. The covers are very similar, but that’s where the similarity ends.Sixteen-year-old Dani is a bit jaded with life. Her fraternal twin, Jena, has cancer and she’s slowly wasting away right before Dani’s eyes. What Dani doesn’t understand is why she is always so lucky. She’s had several experiences where she should have been dead, but she manages to come out fine (hence the “nine lives” belief). Why was she blessed with all of the luck and not Jena?Dani is kind of a brat, and if the plot had been different, I probably would have hated her. She’s very sarcastic and acts almost as if she is entitled (mainly at school and around kids her own age). The beautiful thing about the book is how the author uses such strong, beautiful prose, which is a stark contrast to Dani’s personality. Since the story is told from Dani’s POV, this told me that Dani’s harsh personality was merely a protective shell, and inside there lives someone soft and a little fragile who is being protected by the tough exterior.I really enjoyed the family dynamics. The parents felt real and the relationships between the family members did as well. I loved how Dani’s fragility was more evident around her family, and the bond between she and Jena was nice.If any of you are turned off by the cancer aspect, don’t fret — this isn’t your typical cancer book. It felt different to me for some reason. It’s also not all doom and gloom and family drama. There are several humorous scenes as well as a little romance to balance it all out. My only real issue was that I was hoping for a little more closure in the end, but it wasn’t enough of a loose thread to leave me feeling cheated. This is a great book, and if you are a fan of contemporary dramas, I would recommend it.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Load more
scribd