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BONUS: This special eBook edition includes a bonus short story set in the world of the Iron Druid Chronicles: "A Test of Mettle."

Thor, the Norse god of thunder, is worse than a blowhard and a bully—he’s ruined countless lives and killed scores of innocents. After centuries, Viking vampire Leif Helgarson is ready to get his vengeance, and he’s asked his friend Atticus O’Sullivan, the last of the Druids, to help take down this Norse nightmare.

One survival strategy has worked for Atticus for more than two thousand years: stay away from the guy with the lightning bolts. But things are heating up in Atticus’s home base of Tempe, Arizona. There’s a vampire turf war brewing, and Russian demon hunters who call themselves the Hammers of God are running rampant. Despite multiple warnings and portents of dire consequences, Atticus and Leif journey to the Norse plain of Asgard, where they team up with a werewolf, a sorcerer, and an army of frost giants for an epic showdown against vicious Valkyries, angry gods, and the hammer-wielding Thunder Thug himself.
Published: Random House Publishing Group an imprint of Random House Publishing Group on Jul 5, 2011
ISBN: 9780345522542
List price: $7.99
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Hammered follows immediately after the events of Hexed, the previous novel in this series. The hammer referred to in the title belongs to Thor, who is hands-down the most disliked god in any pantheon. (After killing two gods from the Irish pantheon, Atticus was visited by deities from all over, each of whom wanted to make it clear that deicide was a bad plan, unless the target was Thor.)I'm reading through this series pretty quickly, and finding it fun, light bedtime reading. Anyone interested in details can check my reviews of previous volumes, but in general, my main complaint with the series are that Atticus's voice and tone are way too modern and shallow for an aged druid. The author, Kevin Hearne, addresses this within the books, and clearly isn't going to change it, so it is what it is. Reading other reviews of this series, readers either feel like I do, or think the voice is the best thing about the books, so opinions clearly differ on this.Reading other reviews also helped me put into words another problem I have with the books: the way Atticus's apprentice, Granuaile, is written. She isn't a character as much as a cardboard cut-out. She is way, way too oblivious to her attractiveness to be anything like believable, as ReginaR points out in her perceptive review. She doesn't get any better in this volume, basically sitting out the entire book. When she does show up, she is brilliant, helpful, obedient, gorgeous and sexy. She needs to either grow a personality, go away, or turn out to have been a double agent all along.Now to the specifics for this book: The Norse mythos is by far my favorite. I've read the Eddas several times, and I am familiar with the major and minor characters and the social setting. Hearne does a really impressive job with this. He takes some liberties, but it's really well researched and written. So far, this is my favorite book of the series. Ratatoskr, the squirrel who lives in Yggdrasil, the world-tree, is now my second favorite character after Oberon the wolfhound. (Note - yes, I am saying that the animals are more vivid characters than the humans. And yes, that is a back-handed compliment.) I'm a little peeved that my favorite Aesir, Heimdall, lasts for about 20 seconds, but at least he plays a decisive role.Jesus makes an appearance, as do the Jewish Kaballists from Hexed. Again, Hearne is doing a great job of piling on the problems, setting up scenaria for future volumes, and writing a pulled together series rather than just a bunch of stories. I see from his website that he has this planned as a nine-volume work (the Norse would approve), and I actually believe that he has it planned out and he's not just playing it by ear. (This is a very large and sincere compliment!)There is a really interesting section in the middle, where the adventurers sit around telling their personal stories of why they hate Thor. It's interesting both for it's comments on the role of stories in building community, and for the stories. Hearne has made a real effort here to use voices that aren't clones of Atticus's shallow "frat boy" diction, and it shows. Considered for writing alone, this is the best part of the book.Setting us up for further adventures, Jesus and The Morrigan both tell Atticus in no uncertain terms that going to Asgard and taking on Thor is a huge mistake. He basically ignores them. Naturally, things spiral out of control pretty quickly, and he does a lot more damage to a lot more people/gods/beings than he ever intended. If the ending is any indication, he's in for big trouble from another source as well.I'll keep reading.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
I loved the first two books in the series, so I was surprised that this one bogged down just a little. Perhaps it the hard core male bonding thing going on in this one. I've ordered the audio versions of all three, and I'll report on the audio version. I expect it'll help. The reader has been excellent thus far.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Another good entry in this enjoyable series with Thor the target this time.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
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Hammered follows immediately after the events of Hexed, the previous novel in this series. The hammer referred to in the title belongs to Thor, who is hands-down the most disliked god in any pantheon. (After killing two gods from the Irish pantheon, Atticus was visited by deities from all over, each of whom wanted to make it clear that deicide was a bad plan, unless the target was Thor.)I'm reading through this series pretty quickly, and finding it fun, light bedtime reading. Anyone interested in details can check my reviews of previous volumes, but in general, my main complaint with the series are that Atticus's voice and tone are way too modern and shallow for an aged druid. The author, Kevin Hearne, addresses this within the books, and clearly isn't going to change it, so it is what it is. Reading other reviews of this series, readers either feel like I do, or think the voice is the best thing about the books, so opinions clearly differ on this.Reading other reviews also helped me put into words another problem I have with the books: the way Atticus's apprentice, Granuaile, is written. She isn't a character as much as a cardboard cut-out. She is way, way too oblivious to her attractiveness to be anything like believable, as ReginaR points out in her perceptive review. She doesn't get any better in this volume, basically sitting out the entire book. When she does show up, she is brilliant, helpful, obedient, gorgeous and sexy. She needs to either grow a personality, go away, or turn out to have been a double agent all along.Now to the specifics for this book: The Norse mythos is by far my favorite. I've read the Eddas several times, and I am familiar with the major and minor characters and the social setting. Hearne does a really impressive job with this. He takes some liberties, but it's really well researched and written. So far, this is my favorite book of the series. Ratatoskr, the squirrel who lives in Yggdrasil, the world-tree, is now my second favorite character after Oberon the wolfhound. (Note - yes, I am saying that the animals are more vivid characters than the humans. And yes, that is a back-handed compliment.) I'm a little peeved that my favorite Aesir, Heimdall, lasts for about 20 seconds, but at least he plays a decisive role.Jesus makes an appearance, as do the Jewish Kaballists from Hexed. Again, Hearne is doing a great job of piling on the problems, setting up scenaria for future volumes, and writing a pulled together series rather than just a bunch of stories. I see from his website that he has this planned as a nine-volume work (the Norse would approve), and I actually believe that he has it planned out and he's not just playing it by ear. (This is a very large and sincere compliment!)There is a really interesting section in the middle, where the adventurers sit around telling their personal stories of why they hate Thor. It's interesting both for it's comments on the role of stories in building community, and for the stories. Hearne has made a real effort here to use voices that aren't clones of Atticus's shallow "frat boy" diction, and it shows. Considered for writing alone, this is the best part of the book.Setting us up for further adventures, Jesus and The Morrigan both tell Atticus in no uncertain terms that going to Asgard and taking on Thor is a huge mistake. He basically ignores them. Naturally, things spiral out of control pretty quickly, and he does a lot more damage to a lot more people/gods/beings than he ever intended. If the ending is any indication, he's in for big trouble from another source as well.I'll keep reading.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
I loved the first two books in the series, so I was surprised that this one bogged down just a little. Perhaps it the hard core male bonding thing going on in this one. I've ordered the audio versions of all three, and I'll report on the audio version. I expect it'll help. The reader has been excellent thus far.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Another good entry in this enjoyable series with Thor the target this time.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Atticus makes good on his promise to Lief Helgarson, his lawyer who happens to be a vampire and former Viking, to take him a several other people to fight Thor in Asgard. I enjoyed this as I did the previous two books, I particularly liked the storytelling aspect of the story.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Bought for myselfOverall Rating 4.50Audio Rating 4.50Story Rating 4.75Humor Rating 4.25NOTE: Hammered is the 3rd book in the Iron Druid Chronicles. This is definitely the most emotional of the 3 books with the humor taking a slight back seat. I highly recommend the audio version as Luke Daniels does a great job with the narration.What I Loved: Hammered is a hard story to review without giving away spoilers, which I refuse to do. Where Hounded and Hexed were very fun almost light reads, Hammered packed a wallop of an emotional punch. It is my favorite entry in this series. The introduction of some new characters and the journey of some of the old characters were so well done that I was on the edge waiting to see what is going to happen to next. My favorite part was learning about everyone's back stories through their own words. The camp fire bro-bonding was just by far the best emotional storytelling that Kevin Hearne has written. That being said, Jesus probably had my favorite moment in the book!What I Liked: I really like how Kevin Hearne is able to balance humor and emotional wallops in Hammered. Plus, I know I have said this before but could he have gotten a better narrarator for the audio book than Luke Daniels? I think not! He really did manage to pull off all the many voices needed for Hammered.Complaints: Not enough Oberon and a small cliffhanger! Both of those are just because I love Oberon and I have zero waiting patience!Why I gave it a 4.50: This has been my favorite book in the series to date! Overall this is a series I didn't expect to like and yet I fell in love with! Now if I could just get my hands on book 4: Tricked
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
This one was an interesting installment in the series. In Hexed, Atticus gets quite a bit of help fighting off evil German witches and in return he trades off and makes promises that now must be fulfilled. The time has come in Hammered and now things are starting to get serious.

This one starts a little different than the other ones because we start off with one heck of an action scene and then progress on from there. Again, we have the mixing of different mythologies with this time Norse mythology getting a clear shout out. The journey is concentrated on getting into Asgard to settle several vendettas against Thor. Apparently, he’s not the hero humans believe him to be and is instead a conniving evil bastard with many dangerous enemies. In addition to this dangerous journey things are becoming unsettled in Tempe. New vampires are sniffing about, the Hammers of God are back and the witches still need to watch their backs.

As usual we have some of our regular side characters like Granuaile, the widow and Oberon. We also meet new characters like Jesus and Perun. Lief and Gunnar take center stage in this book, which is alright by me because the interaction between those two and Atticus is pretty hilarious.

Overall the tone of this book is serious due to the mission that needs to be completed. However, there were some hilarious moments and Hearne manages to insert them at much needed times. I mad at Hearne for that one hell of cliff hanger though. *waves fist*
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