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An exciting new edition of the complete works of Shakespeare with these features:  Illustrated with photographs from New York Shakespeare Festival productions, vivid readable readable introductions for each play by noted scholar David Bevington, a lively personal foreword by Joseph Papp, an insightful essay on the play in performance, modern spelling and pronunciation, up-to-date annotated bibliographies, and convenient listing of key passages.
Published: Random House Publishing Group an imprint of Random House Publishing Group on
ISBN: 9780307808011
List price: $6.99
Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
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I guess my love for this play was cemented back in the day before I could grow old enough to balk at the love in it based on nothing but physical appearance, when I was Juliet's age actually. I just listened to the dramatized audiobook tonight, and it still pulls at my heartstrings. One thing hasn't changed; I still love tragedy and the over-dramatic. No surprise that I went on to become a doom metal lover. This is the kind of stuff that musical genre is made out of...well it's actually a wide genre, so it's at least true of a lot of the bands I listen to, like My Dying Bride :) Actually, listening to the song, "For My Fallen Angel" (lyrics below) while reading the last part of this play would be awesome. I need to pair up music and reading more often.

As I draw up my breath,
And silver fills my eyes.
I kiss her still,
For she will never rise.

On my weak body,
Lays her dying hand.
Through those meadows of Heaven,
Where we ran.

Like a thief in the night,
The wind blows so light.
It wars with my tears,
That won't dry for many years.

"Loves golden arrow
At her should have fled,
And not Death's ebon dart
To strike her dead."more
I guess my love for this play was cemented back in the day before I could grow old enough to balk at the love in it based on nothing but physical appearance, when I was Juliet's age actually. I just listened to the dramatized audiobook tonight, and it still pulls at my heartstrings. One thing hasn't changed; I still love tragedy and the over-dramatic. No surprise that I went on to become a doom metal lover. This is the kind of stuff that musical genre is made out of...well it's actually a wide genre, so it's at least true of a lot of the bands I listen to, like My Dying Bride :) Actually, listening to the song, "For My Fallen Angel" (lyrics below) while reading the last part of this play would be awesome. I need to pair up music and reading more often.

As I draw up my breath,
And silver fills my eyes.
I kiss her still,
For she will never rise.

On my weak body,
Lays her dying hand.
Through those meadows of Heaven,
Where we ran.

Like a thief in the night,
The wind blows so light.
It wars with my tears,
That won't dry for many years.

"Loves golden arrow
At her should have fled,
And not Death's ebon dart
To strike her dead."more
I listened to an audiobook version by the BBC. It was very well done and a pleasure to listen to. It was also very short, only about 3 hours long. I enjoyed the story and am glad that I have finally experienced it. Would like to see the play performed live some day.more
I listened to an audiobook version by the BBC. It was very well done and a pleasure to listen to. It was also very short, only about 3 hours long. I enjoyed the story and am glad that I have finally experienced it. Would like to see the play performed live some day.more
I love Shakespeare. I simply detest this play.more
I love Shakespeare. I simply detest this play.more
"Romeo, Romeo, where for art thou, Romeo?"

*rolls eyes*

I've seen way too many skits/parodies for this, and I perfected the plot even before I read the unabridged manuscript. The 1968 movie version (which we were all forced to watch for English Class *cringe*) did feature two very good-looking leads, but basically, I didn't have any respect for two shockingly young idiots who killed themselves for [puppy] love.

Until...

We were forced to make a play for this. I wasn't a happy camper, especially since I was pushed into making our script. Why should we make a play for this, when we already know what's going to happen? Talk about milking it. I don’t think there’s a person who has never heard of Romeo and Juliet. Granted, we were given freedom to change the ending, but aside from that, there is no element of surprise.

What I didn't count on was that the element of surprise, was my new-found respect for Will Shakespeare.

I have to hand it to Shakespeare: he’s a brilliant writer, not only because of the things he writes of, but because of the way he writes them. The words flow wonderfully. It was then that I understood why we had to learn Shakespeare in school: reading his works is a celebration of words.

Taken out of context, Romeo falling in love with Juliet just after he was dumped by Rosaline, induces one to roll one’s eyes. But damn, did you read what Romeo says about Juliet?
“Did my heart love till now? forswear it, sight! For I ne'er saw true beauty till this night.”

A lot of people dissent: This is a romantic story; No, it is not. Whatever it may be, I do believe that Romeo and Juliet’s passion is touching, and in the first few acts, enviable. There are way too many lines between them that I love!

I also believe that it is a cautionary tale. That it was intended to be a tragedy, for R & J to act stupidly because we act stupidly in love, too. And so enter Friar Lawrence to deliver us a most important speech:
These violent delights have violent ends
And in their triumph die, like fire and powder,
Which, as they kiss, consume. The sweetest honey
Is loathsome in his own deliciousness
And in the taste confounds the appetite.
Therefore love moderately. Long love doth so.
Too swift arrives as tardy as too slow.

Thank God for sparknotes, seriously, for this interpretation: These sudden joys have sudden endings. They burn up in victory like fire and gunpowder. When they meet, as in a kiss, they explode. Too much honey is delicious, but it makes you sick to your stomach. Therefore, love each other in moderation. That is the key to long-lasting love. Too fast is as bad as too slow.


Romeo and Juliet made me look at Shakespeare in a whole new light. It made me realize that Shakespeare really is a writing genius. I have a long way into fully appreciating him, since R & J is the only play I’ve read. I do think there will come a time when I will finally muster up the motivation to read through another Shakespeare again.
more
"Romeo, Romeo, where for art thou, Romeo?"

*rolls eyes*

I've seen way too many skits/parodies for this, and I perfected the plot even before I read the unabridged manuscript. The 1968 movie version (which we were all forced to watch for English Class *cringe*) did feature two very good-looking leads, but basically, I didn't have any respect for two shockingly young idiots who killed themselves for [puppy] love.

Until...

We were forced to make a play for this. I wasn't a happy camper, especially since I was pushed into making our script. Why should we make a play for this, when we already know what's going to happen? Talk about milking it. I don’t think there’s a person who has never heard of Romeo and Juliet. Granted, we were given freedom to change the ending, but aside from that, there is no element of surprise.

What I didn't count on was that the element of surprise, was my new-found respect for Will Shakespeare.

I have to hand it to Shakespeare: he’s a brilliant writer, not only because of the things he writes of, but because of the way he writes them. The words flow wonderfully. It was then that I understood why we had to learn Shakespeare in school: reading his works is a celebration of words.

Taken out of context, Romeo falling in love with Juliet just after he was dumped by Rosaline, induces one to roll one’s eyes. But damn, did you read what Romeo says about Juliet?
“Did my heart love till now? forswear it, sight! For I ne'er saw true beauty till this night.”

A lot of people dissent: This is a romantic story; No, it is not. Whatever it may be, I do believe that Romeo and Juliet’s passion is touching, and in the first few acts, enviable. There are way too many lines between them that I love!

I also believe that it is a cautionary tale. That it was intended to be a tragedy, for R & J to act stupidly because we act stupidly in love, too. And so enter Friar Lawrence to deliver us a most important speech:
These violent delights have violent ends
And in their triumph die, like fire and powder,
Which, as they kiss, consume. The sweetest honey
Is loathsome in his own deliciousness
And in the taste confounds the appetite.
Therefore love moderately. Long love doth so.
Too swift arrives as tardy as too slow.

Thank God for sparknotes, seriously, for this interpretation: These sudden joys have sudden endings. They burn up in victory like fire and gunpowder. When they meet, as in a kiss, they explode. Too much honey is delicious, but it makes you sick to your stomach. Therefore, love each other in moderation. That is the key to long-lasting love. Too fast is as bad as too slow.


Romeo and Juliet made me look at Shakespeare in a whole new light. It made me realize that Shakespeare really is a writing genius. I have a long way into fully appreciating him, since R & J is the only play I’ve read. I do think there will come a time when I will finally muster up the motivation to read through another Shakespeare again.
more
Classic story of love and loss. ;) It's Shakespeare, and it's beautiful.more
Classic story of love and loss. ;) It's Shakespeare, and it's beautiful.more
Found this very easy to use and understand. I think my family is tired of me quoting the play then explaining it according to the book. As a theater major I found this book fascinating.more
Found this very easy to use and understand. I think my family is tired of me quoting the play then explaining it according to the book. As a theater major I found this book fascinating.more
This review is for the Frankly Annotated First Folio Edition, with annotations by Demitra Papadinis.The layout of the book is fantastic, making it easy to keep your place in the play when checking on the notes. The notes themselves are fantastic, going in depth and not leaving out the dirty jokes. A thoroughly enjoyable and educational edition!more
This review is for the Frankly Annotated First Folio Edition, with annotations by Demitra Papadinis.The layout of the book is fantastic, making it easy to keep your place in the play when checking on the notes. The notes themselves are fantastic, going in depth and not leaving out the dirty jokes. A thoroughly enjoyable and educational edition!more
Easily one of my least favorite of The Bard's works. Reading this in high school very nearly put me off Shakespeare for good. One of the first books I ever remember reading that made me want to smack both main characters upside the head and ask them "What the heck are you thinking?!"more
Easily one of my least favorite of The Bard's works. Reading this in high school very nearly put me off Shakespeare for good. One of the first books I ever remember reading that made me want to smack both main characters upside the head and ask them "What the heck are you thinking?!"more
For never was a story of more woe
Than this of Juliet and her Romeo.Reading a Shakespeare-play and seeing one is two entirely different things. Having been to the Globe in London and experienced the magic of an evening with Shakespeare it seems a dry thing to "just" read the play. Still, reading it offers time to stop and contemplate and enjoy and savour all the famous quotes and lines of poetry.In this romantic tragedy there's plenty of over-the-top emotions, frantic pace, overwhelming love-songs and declarations of eternal bliss or eternal sorrow - it's just a thing you accept coming to Shakespeare. This is his world and it's just for us to drink it in.And although it's exaggerated the theme is eternal and universal - love - mixed with infatuation and madness - it's a force too powerful to be kept down - and it's explosive in the midst of a feud between two families. This emotional tour de force between Romeo and Juliet is something to be appraised and lamented at the same time. I'm not sure what Shakespeare does most. But both things are there. The admiration of such head-over-the-heels love and the warning against it's power to overwhelm and blinding the persons involved. Good Night, Good night! Parting is such sweet sorrowmore
For never was a story of more woe
Than this of Juliet and her Romeo.Reading a Shakespeare-play and seeing one is two entirely different things. Having been to the Globe in London and experienced the magic of an evening with Shakespeare it seems a dry thing to "just" read the play. Still, reading it offers time to stop and contemplate and enjoy and savour all the famous quotes and lines of poetry.In this romantic tragedy there's plenty of over-the-top emotions, frantic pace, overwhelming love-songs and declarations of eternal bliss or eternal sorrow - it's just a thing you accept coming to Shakespeare. This is his world and it's just for us to drink it in.And although it's exaggerated the theme is eternal and universal - love - mixed with infatuation and madness - it's a force too powerful to be kept down - and it's explosive in the midst of a feud between two families. This emotional tour de force between Romeo and Juliet is something to be appraised and lamented at the same time. I'm not sure what Shakespeare does most. But both things are there. The admiration of such head-over-the-heels love and the warning against it's power to overwhelm and blinding the persons involved. Good Night, Good night! Parting is such sweet sorrowmore
What can I say about Romeo and Juliet that hasn't already been said? Nothing...but I'll still tell you what you've already heard. Romeo and Juliet is one of the most tragic love stories ever written. The love between Romeo and Juliet is so beautiful because it is immediate and forbidden. Isn't that intriguing? Yes. We all want what is forbidden and we all want a love that doesn't ask why, it just is. Unfortunately, the tragic part must be there too because if this love were to last longer than it had, those questions why would have popped up and ended this great love affair. Romeo and Juliet is the classic love story because its timing is right on mark. The love is immediate in two young characters, that love is only experienced for a short period of time and the death comes before any one or any thing can make them no longer be in love.more
What can I say about Romeo and Juliet that hasn't already been said? Nothing...but I'll still tell you what you've already heard. Romeo and Juliet is one of the most tragic love stories ever written. The love between Romeo and Juliet is so beautiful because it is immediate and forbidden. Isn't that intriguing? Yes. We all want what is forbidden and we all want a love that doesn't ask why, it just is. Unfortunately, the tragic part must be there too because if this love were to last longer than it had, those questions why would have popped up and ended this great love affair. Romeo and Juliet is the classic love story because its timing is right on mark. The love is immediate in two young characters, that love is only experienced for a short period of time and the death comes before any one or any thing can make them no longer be in love.more
Interest/Reading Level: Ages 12 and upSynopsis: Romeo and Juliet is the quintessential tragic romance. While written over 500 years ago, the story of passionate love between two teenagers remains a current theme today. Juliet Capulet’s father has told Count Paris, a suitor, that Juliet is too young to marry and he must wait two years. Paris is very in love with Juliet, but Juliet does not love him. Romeo Montague is in love with Rosaline but his love is not returned. The Capulet’s have a party and Romeo with his cousins, crash the event. Romeo sees Juliet and Juliet sees Romeo and it is love at first sight. However, their families have had a long feud and it is unlikely they would ever be able to marry. Juliet wants to marry in secret. Romero, needing some counsel, seeks Friar Laurence for advice. Within a day of the party, Friar Laurence marries the young couple in secret hoping that the marriage will heal the feud between the families. Friar Laurence warns the couple that their love is intense and cannot last long. Benvolio (related to the Prince) and Mercutio (Romeo’s cousin) meet Tybalt (Juliet’s cousin) and other Capulets. Tybalt wants to fight Romeo. Romeo refuses to fight and Mercutio takes up Tybalt’s challenge. When Romeo steps between them, Tybalt kills Mercutio with his sword. In turn, Romeo kills Tybalt. When the Prince hears of the deaths, he does not order Romeo’s execution but banishes him from Verona. Juliet hears the news of her cousin’s death and Romeo’s banishment. Romeo cannot bear leaving his new wife and goes to Friar Laurence for more advice. Friar Laurence tells Romeo he must leave before dawn and tells him to go to Mantua. Friar Laurence is in hopes that he can convince both families to reconcile with the news of their children marrying. Paris still wants to marry Juliet and as her parents have no knowledge of her marriage to Romeo, set a wedding date to be in three days. Juliet’s mother tells her of the wedding and Juliet says no to the marriage. Juliet goes to Friar Laurence for help. Friar Laurence gives her a potion to simulate her death to avoid marrying Paris. He assures her that he will give Romeo the information and Romeo will return to rescue her from the tomb. She drinks the poison, her family believes she is dead, and they bury her in the family tomb. Friar Laurence sends Friar John to Romeo with a letter explaining all the details. But the city officials in Mantua believe he is carrying the plague and refuse to let him enter the city. Romeo returns to Verona upon hearing of Juliet’s death. Romeo starts to open Juliet’s tomb when Paris appears. Paris and Romeo fight and Paris is killed. Romeo says goodbye to Juliet and drinks poison, falling dead at Juliet’s side. Juliet wakes up and sees Romeo is dead. She takes Romeo’s dagger and kills herself. When the families find out, they are bound by shared grief and agree to end the feud.Review: Without a doubt, this is one of my all time favorite love stories. I first read it in high school when my English teacher provided each act on mimeographed paper. She had made a class set and we read the play in class. This was back in the day when class sets of books were unheard of. This particular book is well thought out providing a couple of pages of Shakespeare’s original copy written 1599 as samples of plays written in his time period. The book has footnotes the text references written in bold and the annotations written in standard type. The cover of the book has a dark-haired young man with a blonde young women looking into his eyes. The young people are dressed in current clothing, not period clothing. This is from Penguin Group (Puffin) and they are marketing the teen population by making the illustrations enticing. Other titles they have done like this include Hamlet, Pride and Prejudice, Jane Eyre, and Dracula. Once inside the cover, the play is classic Shakespeare. The old English is a bit difficult to read, but with so many versions of the movie available, most students have a good idea of the story line. The task for the teacher is to cut through the language and work through the words to understand the meaning of the dialogue. Act 5, Scene 3, Line 29 begins Friar Laurence’s explanation of the events surrounding the deaths of Romeo and Juliet. He claims it is his fault that they are dead and offers his life in sacrifice. This is my favorite monologue of the play. Shakespeare captures all the events and outcome is the simple friar’s speech. It is as beautiful as is the last line of the time-honored tragedy. “For never was a story of more woe than this of Juliet and her Romeo.”more
This is proof that Shakespeare plays should be experienced not read. As a piece of literature, this does not work. As a drama, this is exceptional. Conclusion...watch the movie.more
Romeo and Juliet has got to be one of my favorite stories. Even though i don't understand most of the language since it is hundreds of years old. It really makes me think about what they're trying to say in the sonnets and other poetry Shakespeare had put in this story. Other than the word choice the author uses, the plot catches my attention almost every scene. It's like there's one problem right after the other. But not of the small conflicts in the story could compare to what happened to the end. Even though i never like stories with bad endings, this has got to be my favorite.more
Setting: The play is set in Verona; its main theme is true love.Plot: Romeo and Juliet, members of feuding families meet and fall in love. They get married but Romeo is banished and the play ends with their deaths.Characters: Romeo (protagonist)- moony, passionate; Juliet (protagonist) loving, shrewd; Firar Lawrence- fatherly, helpful; Tybalt (antagonist) hates peace; Mercutio- playful, fun loving; Benvolio- peacemaker; Montague- Romeo's father; Capulet- Juliet's fatherSymbols: love, pilot of life allusionsCharacteristics: play, Romeo and Juliet's sonnet, famous quotes such as "a thousand times good night"My Response: I think this story is too well known to make a lasting impression on me.more
When two star-crossed lovers meet, it's love at first sight. Despite being from rival families, Romeo and Juliet forsake their own families and risk everything to be together, which ends in tragedy.more
Read all 83 reviews

Reviews

I guess my love for this play was cemented back in the day before I could grow old enough to balk at the love in it based on nothing but physical appearance, when I was Juliet's age actually. I just listened to the dramatized audiobook tonight, and it still pulls at my heartstrings. One thing hasn't changed; I still love tragedy and the over-dramatic. No surprise that I went on to become a doom metal lover. This is the kind of stuff that musical genre is made out of...well it's actually a wide genre, so it's at least true of a lot of the bands I listen to, like My Dying Bride :) Actually, listening to the song, "For My Fallen Angel" (lyrics below) while reading the last part of this play would be awesome. I need to pair up music and reading more often.

As I draw up my breath,
And silver fills my eyes.
I kiss her still,
For she will never rise.

On my weak body,
Lays her dying hand.
Through those meadows of Heaven,
Where we ran.

Like a thief in the night,
The wind blows so light.
It wars with my tears,
That won't dry for many years.

"Loves golden arrow
At her should have fled,
And not Death's ebon dart
To strike her dead."more
I guess my love for this play was cemented back in the day before I could grow old enough to balk at the love in it based on nothing but physical appearance, when I was Juliet's age actually. I just listened to the dramatized audiobook tonight, and it still pulls at my heartstrings. One thing hasn't changed; I still love tragedy and the over-dramatic. No surprise that I went on to become a doom metal lover. This is the kind of stuff that musical genre is made out of...well it's actually a wide genre, so it's at least true of a lot of the bands I listen to, like My Dying Bride :) Actually, listening to the song, "For My Fallen Angel" (lyrics below) while reading the last part of this play would be awesome. I need to pair up music and reading more often.

As I draw up my breath,
And silver fills my eyes.
I kiss her still,
For she will never rise.

On my weak body,
Lays her dying hand.
Through those meadows of Heaven,
Where we ran.

Like a thief in the night,
The wind blows so light.
It wars with my tears,
That won't dry for many years.

"Loves golden arrow
At her should have fled,
And not Death's ebon dart
To strike her dead."more
I listened to an audiobook version by the BBC. It was very well done and a pleasure to listen to. It was also very short, only about 3 hours long. I enjoyed the story and am glad that I have finally experienced it. Would like to see the play performed live some day.more
I listened to an audiobook version by the BBC. It was very well done and a pleasure to listen to. It was also very short, only about 3 hours long. I enjoyed the story and am glad that I have finally experienced it. Would like to see the play performed live some day.more
I love Shakespeare. I simply detest this play.more
I love Shakespeare. I simply detest this play.more
"Romeo, Romeo, where for art thou, Romeo?"

*rolls eyes*

I've seen way too many skits/parodies for this, and I perfected the plot even before I read the unabridged manuscript. The 1968 movie version (which we were all forced to watch for English Class *cringe*) did feature two very good-looking leads, but basically, I didn't have any respect for two shockingly young idiots who killed themselves for [puppy] love.

Until...

We were forced to make a play for this. I wasn't a happy camper, especially since I was pushed into making our script. Why should we make a play for this, when we already know what's going to happen? Talk about milking it. I don’t think there’s a person who has never heard of Romeo and Juliet. Granted, we were given freedom to change the ending, but aside from that, there is no element of surprise.

What I didn't count on was that the element of surprise, was my new-found respect for Will Shakespeare.

I have to hand it to Shakespeare: he’s a brilliant writer, not only because of the things he writes of, but because of the way he writes them. The words flow wonderfully. It was then that I understood why we had to learn Shakespeare in school: reading his works is a celebration of words.

Taken out of context, Romeo falling in love with Juliet just after he was dumped by Rosaline, induces one to roll one’s eyes. But damn, did you read what Romeo says about Juliet?
“Did my heart love till now? forswear it, sight! For I ne'er saw true beauty till this night.”

A lot of people dissent: This is a romantic story; No, it is not. Whatever it may be, I do believe that Romeo and Juliet’s passion is touching, and in the first few acts, enviable. There are way too many lines between them that I love!

I also believe that it is a cautionary tale. That it was intended to be a tragedy, for R & J to act stupidly because we act stupidly in love, too. And so enter Friar Lawrence to deliver us a most important speech:
These violent delights have violent ends
And in their triumph die, like fire and powder,
Which, as they kiss, consume. The sweetest honey
Is loathsome in his own deliciousness
And in the taste confounds the appetite.
Therefore love moderately. Long love doth so.
Too swift arrives as tardy as too slow.

Thank God for sparknotes, seriously, for this interpretation: These sudden joys have sudden endings. They burn up in victory like fire and gunpowder. When they meet, as in a kiss, they explode. Too much honey is delicious, but it makes you sick to your stomach. Therefore, love each other in moderation. That is the key to long-lasting love. Too fast is as bad as too slow.


Romeo and Juliet made me look at Shakespeare in a whole new light. It made me realize that Shakespeare really is a writing genius. I have a long way into fully appreciating him, since R & J is the only play I’ve read. I do think there will come a time when I will finally muster up the motivation to read through another Shakespeare again.
more
"Romeo, Romeo, where for art thou, Romeo?"

*rolls eyes*

I've seen way too many skits/parodies for this, and I perfected the plot even before I read the unabridged manuscript. The 1968 movie version (which we were all forced to watch for English Class *cringe*) did feature two very good-looking leads, but basically, I didn't have any respect for two shockingly young idiots who killed themselves for [puppy] love.

Until...

We were forced to make a play for this. I wasn't a happy camper, especially since I was pushed into making our script. Why should we make a play for this, when we already know what's going to happen? Talk about milking it. I don’t think there’s a person who has never heard of Romeo and Juliet. Granted, we were given freedom to change the ending, but aside from that, there is no element of surprise.

What I didn't count on was that the element of surprise, was my new-found respect for Will Shakespeare.

I have to hand it to Shakespeare: he’s a brilliant writer, not only because of the things he writes of, but because of the way he writes them. The words flow wonderfully. It was then that I understood why we had to learn Shakespeare in school: reading his works is a celebration of words.

Taken out of context, Romeo falling in love with Juliet just after he was dumped by Rosaline, induces one to roll one’s eyes. But damn, did you read what Romeo says about Juliet?
“Did my heart love till now? forswear it, sight! For I ne'er saw true beauty till this night.”

A lot of people dissent: This is a romantic story; No, it is not. Whatever it may be, I do believe that Romeo and Juliet’s passion is touching, and in the first few acts, enviable. There are way too many lines between them that I love!

I also believe that it is a cautionary tale. That it was intended to be a tragedy, for R & J to act stupidly because we act stupidly in love, too. And so enter Friar Lawrence to deliver us a most important speech:
These violent delights have violent ends
And in their triumph die, like fire and powder,
Which, as they kiss, consume. The sweetest honey
Is loathsome in his own deliciousness
And in the taste confounds the appetite.
Therefore love moderately. Long love doth so.
Too swift arrives as tardy as too slow.

Thank God for sparknotes, seriously, for this interpretation: These sudden joys have sudden endings. They burn up in victory like fire and gunpowder. When they meet, as in a kiss, they explode. Too much honey is delicious, but it makes you sick to your stomach. Therefore, love each other in moderation. That is the key to long-lasting love. Too fast is as bad as too slow.


Romeo and Juliet made me look at Shakespeare in a whole new light. It made me realize that Shakespeare really is a writing genius. I have a long way into fully appreciating him, since R & J is the only play I’ve read. I do think there will come a time when I will finally muster up the motivation to read through another Shakespeare again.
more
Classic story of love and loss. ;) It's Shakespeare, and it's beautiful.more
Classic story of love and loss. ;) It's Shakespeare, and it's beautiful.more
Found this very easy to use and understand. I think my family is tired of me quoting the play then explaining it according to the book. As a theater major I found this book fascinating.more
Found this very easy to use and understand. I think my family is tired of me quoting the play then explaining it according to the book. As a theater major I found this book fascinating.more
This review is for the Frankly Annotated First Folio Edition, with annotations by Demitra Papadinis.The layout of the book is fantastic, making it easy to keep your place in the play when checking on the notes. The notes themselves are fantastic, going in depth and not leaving out the dirty jokes. A thoroughly enjoyable and educational edition!more
This review is for the Frankly Annotated First Folio Edition, with annotations by Demitra Papadinis.The layout of the book is fantastic, making it easy to keep your place in the play when checking on the notes. The notes themselves are fantastic, going in depth and not leaving out the dirty jokes. A thoroughly enjoyable and educational edition!more
Easily one of my least favorite of The Bard's works. Reading this in high school very nearly put me off Shakespeare for good. One of the first books I ever remember reading that made me want to smack both main characters upside the head and ask them "What the heck are you thinking?!"more
Easily one of my least favorite of The Bard's works. Reading this in high school very nearly put me off Shakespeare for good. One of the first books I ever remember reading that made me want to smack both main characters upside the head and ask them "What the heck are you thinking?!"more
For never was a story of more woe
Than this of Juliet and her Romeo.Reading a Shakespeare-play and seeing one is two entirely different things. Having been to the Globe in London and experienced the magic of an evening with Shakespeare it seems a dry thing to "just" read the play. Still, reading it offers time to stop and contemplate and enjoy and savour all the famous quotes and lines of poetry.In this romantic tragedy there's plenty of over-the-top emotions, frantic pace, overwhelming love-songs and declarations of eternal bliss or eternal sorrow - it's just a thing you accept coming to Shakespeare. This is his world and it's just for us to drink it in.And although it's exaggerated the theme is eternal and universal - love - mixed with infatuation and madness - it's a force too powerful to be kept down - and it's explosive in the midst of a feud between two families. This emotional tour de force between Romeo and Juliet is something to be appraised and lamented at the same time. I'm not sure what Shakespeare does most. But both things are there. The admiration of such head-over-the-heels love and the warning against it's power to overwhelm and blinding the persons involved. Good Night, Good night! Parting is such sweet sorrowmore
For never was a story of more woe
Than this of Juliet and her Romeo.Reading a Shakespeare-play and seeing one is two entirely different things. Having been to the Globe in London and experienced the magic of an evening with Shakespeare it seems a dry thing to "just" read the play. Still, reading it offers time to stop and contemplate and enjoy and savour all the famous quotes and lines of poetry.In this romantic tragedy there's plenty of over-the-top emotions, frantic pace, overwhelming love-songs and declarations of eternal bliss or eternal sorrow - it's just a thing you accept coming to Shakespeare. This is his world and it's just for us to drink it in.And although it's exaggerated the theme is eternal and universal - love - mixed with infatuation and madness - it's a force too powerful to be kept down - and it's explosive in the midst of a feud between two families. This emotional tour de force between Romeo and Juliet is something to be appraised and lamented at the same time. I'm not sure what Shakespeare does most. But both things are there. The admiration of such head-over-the-heels love and the warning against it's power to overwhelm and blinding the persons involved. Good Night, Good night! Parting is such sweet sorrowmore
What can I say about Romeo and Juliet that hasn't already been said? Nothing...but I'll still tell you what you've already heard. Romeo and Juliet is one of the most tragic love stories ever written. The love between Romeo and Juliet is so beautiful because it is immediate and forbidden. Isn't that intriguing? Yes. We all want what is forbidden and we all want a love that doesn't ask why, it just is. Unfortunately, the tragic part must be there too because if this love were to last longer than it had, those questions why would have popped up and ended this great love affair. Romeo and Juliet is the classic love story because its timing is right on mark. The love is immediate in two young characters, that love is only experienced for a short period of time and the death comes before any one or any thing can make them no longer be in love.more
What can I say about Romeo and Juliet that hasn't already been said? Nothing...but I'll still tell you what you've already heard. Romeo and Juliet is one of the most tragic love stories ever written. The love between Romeo and Juliet is so beautiful because it is immediate and forbidden. Isn't that intriguing? Yes. We all want what is forbidden and we all want a love that doesn't ask why, it just is. Unfortunately, the tragic part must be there too because if this love were to last longer than it had, those questions why would have popped up and ended this great love affair. Romeo and Juliet is the classic love story because its timing is right on mark. The love is immediate in two young characters, that love is only experienced for a short period of time and the death comes before any one or any thing can make them no longer be in love.more
Interest/Reading Level: Ages 12 and upSynopsis: Romeo and Juliet is the quintessential tragic romance. While written over 500 years ago, the story of passionate love between two teenagers remains a current theme today. Juliet Capulet’s father has told Count Paris, a suitor, that Juliet is too young to marry and he must wait two years. Paris is very in love with Juliet, but Juliet does not love him. Romeo Montague is in love with Rosaline but his love is not returned. The Capulet’s have a party and Romeo with his cousins, crash the event. Romeo sees Juliet and Juliet sees Romeo and it is love at first sight. However, their families have had a long feud and it is unlikely they would ever be able to marry. Juliet wants to marry in secret. Romero, needing some counsel, seeks Friar Laurence for advice. Within a day of the party, Friar Laurence marries the young couple in secret hoping that the marriage will heal the feud between the families. Friar Laurence warns the couple that their love is intense and cannot last long. Benvolio (related to the Prince) and Mercutio (Romeo’s cousin) meet Tybalt (Juliet’s cousin) and other Capulets. Tybalt wants to fight Romeo. Romeo refuses to fight and Mercutio takes up Tybalt’s challenge. When Romeo steps between them, Tybalt kills Mercutio with his sword. In turn, Romeo kills Tybalt. When the Prince hears of the deaths, he does not order Romeo’s execution but banishes him from Verona. Juliet hears the news of her cousin’s death and Romeo’s banishment. Romeo cannot bear leaving his new wife and goes to Friar Laurence for more advice. Friar Laurence tells Romeo he must leave before dawn and tells him to go to Mantua. Friar Laurence is in hopes that he can convince both families to reconcile with the news of their children marrying. Paris still wants to marry Juliet and as her parents have no knowledge of her marriage to Romeo, set a wedding date to be in three days. Juliet’s mother tells her of the wedding and Juliet says no to the marriage. Juliet goes to Friar Laurence for help. Friar Laurence gives her a potion to simulate her death to avoid marrying Paris. He assures her that he will give Romeo the information and Romeo will return to rescue her from the tomb. She drinks the poison, her family believes she is dead, and they bury her in the family tomb. Friar Laurence sends Friar John to Romeo with a letter explaining all the details. But the city officials in Mantua believe he is carrying the plague and refuse to let him enter the city. Romeo returns to Verona upon hearing of Juliet’s death. Romeo starts to open Juliet’s tomb when Paris appears. Paris and Romeo fight and Paris is killed. Romeo says goodbye to Juliet and drinks poison, falling dead at Juliet’s side. Juliet wakes up and sees Romeo is dead. She takes Romeo’s dagger and kills herself. When the families find out, they are bound by shared grief and agree to end the feud.Review: Without a doubt, this is one of my all time favorite love stories. I first read it in high school when my English teacher provided each act on mimeographed paper. She had made a class set and we read the play in class. This was back in the day when class sets of books were unheard of. This particular book is well thought out providing a couple of pages of Shakespeare’s original copy written 1599 as samples of plays written in his time period. The book has footnotes the text references written in bold and the annotations written in standard type. The cover of the book has a dark-haired young man with a blonde young women looking into his eyes. The young people are dressed in current clothing, not period clothing. This is from Penguin Group (Puffin) and they are marketing the teen population by making the illustrations enticing. Other titles they have done like this include Hamlet, Pride and Prejudice, Jane Eyre, and Dracula. Once inside the cover, the play is classic Shakespeare. The old English is a bit difficult to read, but with so many versions of the movie available, most students have a good idea of the story line. The task for the teacher is to cut through the language and work through the words to understand the meaning of the dialogue. Act 5, Scene 3, Line 29 begins Friar Laurence’s explanation of the events surrounding the deaths of Romeo and Juliet. He claims it is his fault that they are dead and offers his life in sacrifice. This is my favorite monologue of the play. Shakespeare captures all the events and outcome is the simple friar’s speech. It is as beautiful as is the last line of the time-honored tragedy. “For never was a story of more woe than this of Juliet and her Romeo.”more
This is proof that Shakespeare plays should be experienced not read. As a piece of literature, this does not work. As a drama, this is exceptional. Conclusion...watch the movie.more
Romeo and Juliet has got to be one of my favorite stories. Even though i don't understand most of the language since it is hundreds of years old. It really makes me think about what they're trying to say in the sonnets and other poetry Shakespeare had put in this story. Other than the word choice the author uses, the plot catches my attention almost every scene. It's like there's one problem right after the other. But not of the small conflicts in the story could compare to what happened to the end. Even though i never like stories with bad endings, this has got to be my favorite.more
Setting: The play is set in Verona; its main theme is true love.Plot: Romeo and Juliet, members of feuding families meet and fall in love. They get married but Romeo is banished and the play ends with their deaths.Characters: Romeo (protagonist)- moony, passionate; Juliet (protagonist) loving, shrewd; Firar Lawrence- fatherly, helpful; Tybalt (antagonist) hates peace; Mercutio- playful, fun loving; Benvolio- peacemaker; Montague- Romeo's father; Capulet- Juliet's fatherSymbols: love, pilot of life allusionsCharacteristics: play, Romeo and Juliet's sonnet, famous quotes such as "a thousand times good night"My Response: I think this story is too well known to make a lasting impression on me.more
When two star-crossed lovers meet, it's love at first sight. Despite being from rival families, Romeo and Juliet forsake their own families and risk everything to be together, which ends in tragedy.more
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