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From Frank Portman, author of the cult classic King Dork that John Green says "will rock your world", comes a novel about Andromeda Klein, who has a few problems of her own.

Her hair is kind of horrible.

Her partner-in-occultism, Daisy, is dead.

Her secret, estranged, much older and forbidden boyfriend-in-theory, has gone AWOL.

And her mother has learned how to text.

In short, things couldn't get much worse. Until they do. Daisy seems to be attempting to make contact from beyond, books are starting to disappear from the library, and then, strangely and suddenly, Andromeda's tarot readings are beginning to predict events with bizarrely literal accuracy.

Omens are everywhere. Dreams; swords; fires; hidden cards; lost, broken, and dead cell phones . . . and what is Daisy trying to tell her?

In the ensuing struggle of neutral versus evil, it's Andromeda Klein against the world, modern society, demonic forces, and the "friends" of the library.


From the Hardcover edition.
Published: Random House Kids an imprint of Random House Publishing Group on
ISBN: 9780375890956
List price: $9.99
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Andromeda Klein is a witch, er, occultist, with a hearing problem, quarreling parents, a long-gone boyfriend and a dead best friend. She seeks guidance/solace in her Tarot cards but begins to get messages from her friend Daisy and "synchs" (sychronizations) begin to occur with increasing frequency. Like King Dork, where the author's asides and digressions are as interesting as the story, this novel takes its time getting where it's going. The occult references are numbing and without any grounding. The book succeeds most when it focuses on Andromeda and her struggles as an outsider trying to find a place in high school society. The book has a surprisingly happy, satisfying ending. The reader who perseveres will find a real treat.more
Loved King Dork, just couldn't embrace this one as much. Took me awhile to finish this one. I'll be eagerly waiting for his next book still.more
Slow read - often muddied. Wade away from the banks of the first 50 pages and the waters start to clear -- but there is no current that takes you away. Dealing with the occult - one gets the impression the author busied himself so much with reading up on the complexities of the subject that he never got the chance to unstring the tangled points of light into a cohesive plot.more
Andromeda Klein feels like an outcast. Her belief in the occult, hearing impairment, weird family and the death of her best friend have all put her on the outskirts of school society. But when the library begins to discard its very complete collection of occult literature, Andromeda begins a campaign to save the books and finds herself a disciple.more
Okay, let me start by saying that I truly enjoyed this book. It was engaging, interesting and kept my attention.It follows the adventures of Andromeda Klein, a quirky, independent loner who is interested in ceremonial magic, knows how to properly pronounce Crowley's name and has a crush on A.E. Waite. She dabbles in Tarot on the side and is determined to save the occult book collection in her local library. She also has a hearing disorder which leads to hearing things such as "some extra hours" as "Sylvester Mouse" and "pagans" as "bacon" She also has a mother who is enraptured by an online game and a father who suffers from paranoia that the world is full of government conspiracies.Add to this the fact that her friend and occult partner has recently died, her mysterious, secret boyfriend has disappeared and her "friends" are determined to fix her up with someone and things get interesting.I wish I could meet and talk to a teen like Andromeda. Of course the irony is that teens really don't want to talk to adults - we just don't understand.more
I couldn't even finish this book. It has some wonderful moments, but for the most part I found it pretty boring. There are too many long passages explaining Tarot and other occult practices, and not enough time concentrating on the plot. I loved the character of Andromeda, and think there was a lot of potential here, it was just too strange for me.more
Andromeda Klein is a strange girl with a strange life. She’s into magic and tarot and reads obsessively on the subject. Her best friend has recently died, her much older boyfriend has disappeared and her parents are as kooky as she is. But things get really complicated when she discovers the “friends of the library” plot to rid her local library of all the best books.Ok…first what I liked about this novel: Andromeda is a well-drawn and fascinating specimen. Her interactions with people are often unintentionally hilarious or even borderline dangerous because her hearing problem (something to do with brittle bones) means she mishears about 68% of what is said. There are many scenes where you just have to shake your head in wonder at the twisted imagination necessary to think up such absurdities and such wacky characters (I particularly liked the paranoid dad and the hyper-texting mom).And of course I loved the bits about coincidence, being that it is the subject of my imaginary thesis. Apparently, “the universe chooses to show itself in tiny flashes, revealing connections amongst its diverse elements at odd moments. Coincidence, say the unobservant or the spiritually obtuse, when they notice them at all. But educated people […] know them as synchs, since the common understanding of coincidence implies something accidental, and there are no accidents.” (p. 2 ARC version. May vary from the final printed version.)As Andromeda tells her “disciple” (a guy who for some reason would prefer to be her boyfriend), “A synch would be like: [….] you know, the Universe is nudging you a little there. […] Maybe it’s telling you something that’s going to happen, or maybe it’s showing something about what is happening. Or maybe it just wants you to wake up a little.” (p. 328, ARC)But….because there is so little actually going on (the “friends of the library” plot notwithstanding), the book feels overlong and the constant references to obscure occult literature become tiresome very quickly. I have to admit that my eyes glazed over at times, and I resorted to skimming through some sections.This will be a tough sell for the pink and glitter crowd, but I am sure there are some which will think it’s utterly brilliant.more
Andromeda is a self-taught occult and tarot expert. I’ll offer fair warning here: those uncomfortable with details of the occult and magick with a “k” are not going to like this book and probably shouldn’t read it. I was surprised by how much, and how deep, the details of Andromeda’s occult practices and knowledge went. There are passages about demons, conjuring, body modification, ghosts, and spirit-world communication.That said, I found this a fascinating book. Portman presents Andromeda’s studies in a fair, informative way. It’s not devil worship, or (intentional) demon conjuring. Rather, it’s an ancient and varied tradition that seeks knowledge and understanding of the self and the universe–rather like religion. If you feel there’s more than one path up the mountain, and are interested in tarot as well as a good young adult mystery novel, I think you’ll really enjoy Andromeda Klein, the book and the character.Life is complicated enough because Andromeda has something called “disorganized collagen”. It makes her body and especially her hearing out of whack. (It does, though, make for an entertaining lexicon of misheard phrases, such as bacon for pagan, vacuum for bathroom, and spinach U-turn for Finnish Lutheran.) Further, her friend and occult “sister” Daisy recently passed away, and her friend Rosalie is a bundle of bad news: steals a car that can only be driven in reverse, schedules drinking parties for her friends when parents are away, and tries to set up Andromeda with weird guys. Andromeda’s mother is controlling and intrusive; her father is depressive. And she’s recently broken up with someone she calls “St. Steve” and feels really bad about it.This book was often sad, but also funny and singular. Andromeda has a strong, unique and humorous character voice. It’s easy to feel for Andromeda, and hope things turn out well for her. There’s no neat and tidy happy ending, but there’s a satisfyingly complex one that gives a lot of credit to its readers by leaving some things to the imagination. I was completely involved in this book till I put it down; it’s an involving and engaging character and story.more
I was hesitant to read a teen novel at first, but it looked so interesting that I took it home anyway. Honestly, I couldn't put it down. Andromeda Klein is a junior in high school, with bad hair, a dead best friend, a failed romance with an older man, and an all-encompassing passion for magic and occultism. This novel is about her trying to make sense of the magic clues around her, seemingly left by her dead friend. In the meantime, she must also save the local library's collection of occult books.more
Read all 10 reviews

Reviews

Andromeda Klein is a witch, er, occultist, with a hearing problem, quarreling parents, a long-gone boyfriend and a dead best friend. She seeks guidance/solace in her Tarot cards but begins to get messages from her friend Daisy and "synchs" (sychronizations) begin to occur with increasing frequency. Like King Dork, where the author's asides and digressions are as interesting as the story, this novel takes its time getting where it's going. The occult references are numbing and without any grounding. The book succeeds most when it focuses on Andromeda and her struggles as an outsider trying to find a place in high school society. The book has a surprisingly happy, satisfying ending. The reader who perseveres will find a real treat.more
Loved King Dork, just couldn't embrace this one as much. Took me awhile to finish this one. I'll be eagerly waiting for his next book still.more
Slow read - often muddied. Wade away from the banks of the first 50 pages and the waters start to clear -- but there is no current that takes you away. Dealing with the occult - one gets the impression the author busied himself so much with reading up on the complexities of the subject that he never got the chance to unstring the tangled points of light into a cohesive plot.more
Andromeda Klein feels like an outcast. Her belief in the occult, hearing impairment, weird family and the death of her best friend have all put her on the outskirts of school society. But when the library begins to discard its very complete collection of occult literature, Andromeda begins a campaign to save the books and finds herself a disciple.more
Okay, let me start by saying that I truly enjoyed this book. It was engaging, interesting and kept my attention.It follows the adventures of Andromeda Klein, a quirky, independent loner who is interested in ceremonial magic, knows how to properly pronounce Crowley's name and has a crush on A.E. Waite. She dabbles in Tarot on the side and is determined to save the occult book collection in her local library. She also has a hearing disorder which leads to hearing things such as "some extra hours" as "Sylvester Mouse" and "pagans" as "bacon" She also has a mother who is enraptured by an online game and a father who suffers from paranoia that the world is full of government conspiracies.Add to this the fact that her friend and occult partner has recently died, her mysterious, secret boyfriend has disappeared and her "friends" are determined to fix her up with someone and things get interesting.I wish I could meet and talk to a teen like Andromeda. Of course the irony is that teens really don't want to talk to adults - we just don't understand.more
I couldn't even finish this book. It has some wonderful moments, but for the most part I found it pretty boring. There are too many long passages explaining Tarot and other occult practices, and not enough time concentrating on the plot. I loved the character of Andromeda, and think there was a lot of potential here, it was just too strange for me.more
Andromeda Klein is a strange girl with a strange life. She’s into magic and tarot and reads obsessively on the subject. Her best friend has recently died, her much older boyfriend has disappeared and her parents are as kooky as she is. But things get really complicated when she discovers the “friends of the library” plot to rid her local library of all the best books.Ok…first what I liked about this novel: Andromeda is a well-drawn and fascinating specimen. Her interactions with people are often unintentionally hilarious or even borderline dangerous because her hearing problem (something to do with brittle bones) means she mishears about 68% of what is said. There are many scenes where you just have to shake your head in wonder at the twisted imagination necessary to think up such absurdities and such wacky characters (I particularly liked the paranoid dad and the hyper-texting mom).And of course I loved the bits about coincidence, being that it is the subject of my imaginary thesis. Apparently, “the universe chooses to show itself in tiny flashes, revealing connections amongst its diverse elements at odd moments. Coincidence, say the unobservant or the spiritually obtuse, when they notice them at all. But educated people […] know them as synchs, since the common understanding of coincidence implies something accidental, and there are no accidents.” (p. 2 ARC version. May vary from the final printed version.)As Andromeda tells her “disciple” (a guy who for some reason would prefer to be her boyfriend), “A synch would be like: [….] you know, the Universe is nudging you a little there. […] Maybe it’s telling you something that’s going to happen, or maybe it’s showing something about what is happening. Or maybe it just wants you to wake up a little.” (p. 328, ARC)But….because there is so little actually going on (the “friends of the library” plot notwithstanding), the book feels overlong and the constant references to obscure occult literature become tiresome very quickly. I have to admit that my eyes glazed over at times, and I resorted to skimming through some sections.This will be a tough sell for the pink and glitter crowd, but I am sure there are some which will think it’s utterly brilliant.more
Andromeda is a self-taught occult and tarot expert. I’ll offer fair warning here: those uncomfortable with details of the occult and magick with a “k” are not going to like this book and probably shouldn’t read it. I was surprised by how much, and how deep, the details of Andromeda’s occult practices and knowledge went. There are passages about demons, conjuring, body modification, ghosts, and spirit-world communication.That said, I found this a fascinating book. Portman presents Andromeda’s studies in a fair, informative way. It’s not devil worship, or (intentional) demon conjuring. Rather, it’s an ancient and varied tradition that seeks knowledge and understanding of the self and the universe–rather like religion. If you feel there’s more than one path up the mountain, and are interested in tarot as well as a good young adult mystery novel, I think you’ll really enjoy Andromeda Klein, the book and the character.Life is complicated enough because Andromeda has something called “disorganized collagen”. It makes her body and especially her hearing out of whack. (It does, though, make for an entertaining lexicon of misheard phrases, such as bacon for pagan, vacuum for bathroom, and spinach U-turn for Finnish Lutheran.) Further, her friend and occult “sister” Daisy recently passed away, and her friend Rosalie is a bundle of bad news: steals a car that can only be driven in reverse, schedules drinking parties for her friends when parents are away, and tries to set up Andromeda with weird guys. Andromeda’s mother is controlling and intrusive; her father is depressive. And she’s recently broken up with someone she calls “St. Steve” and feels really bad about it.This book was often sad, but also funny and singular. Andromeda has a strong, unique and humorous character voice. It’s easy to feel for Andromeda, and hope things turn out well for her. There’s no neat and tidy happy ending, but there’s a satisfyingly complex one that gives a lot of credit to its readers by leaving some things to the imagination. I was completely involved in this book till I put it down; it’s an involving and engaging character and story.more
I was hesitant to read a teen novel at first, but it looked so interesting that I took it home anyway. Honestly, I couldn't put it down. Andromeda Klein is a junior in high school, with bad hair, a dead best friend, a failed romance with an older man, and an all-encompassing passion for magic and occultism. This novel is about her trying to make sense of the magic clues around her, seemingly left by her dead friend. In the meantime, she must also save the local library's collection of occult books.more
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