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Jane Austen's novella Lady Susan was written during the same period as another novella called Elinor and Marianne–which was later revised and expanded to become Sense and Sensibility. Unfortunately for readers, Lady Susan did not enjoy the same treatment by its author and was left abandoned and forgotten by all but the most diligent Austen scholars. Until now.

In Lady Vernon and Her Daughter, Jane Rubino and Caitlen Rubino-Bradway have taken Austen's original novella and transformed it into a vivid and richly developed novel of love lost and found–and the complex relationships between women, men, and money in Regency England.

Lady Vernon and her daughter, Frederica, are left penniless and without a home after the death of Sir Frederick Vernon, Susan's husband. Frederick' s brother and heir, Charles Vernon, like so many others of his time, has forgotten his promises to look after the women, and despite their fervent hopes to the contrary, does nothing to financially support Lady Vernon and Frederica.

When the ladies, left without another option, bravely arrive at Charles's home to confront him about his treatment of his family, they are faced with Charles's indifference, his wife Catherine's distrustful animosity, and a flood of rumors that threaten to undo them all. Will Lady Vernon and Frederica find love and happiness–and financial security– or will their hopes be dashed with their lost fortune?

With wit and warmth reminiscent of Austen's greatest works, Lady Vernon and Her Daughter brings to vivid life a time and place where a woman's security is at the mercy of an entail, where love is hindered by misunderstanding, where marriage can never be entirely isolated from money, yet where romance somehow carries the day.


From the Hardcover edition.
Published: Crown Publishing Group an imprint of Random House Publishing Group on Oct 6, 2009
ISBN: 9780307461681
List price: $11.99
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A mother/daughter writing team have taken Jane Austen's epistolary novella, Lady Susan, filled in a back story, and turned it into a novel worthy of Jane Austen herself. It's not like some Austen-inspired fiction, where Austen's beloved characters speak and behave according to 21st century standards. I didn't notice any anachronisms in the story. The authors do engage in a bit of name-dropping. Sir Walter Elliot's family is mentioned a couple of times, including his middle daughter. Mrs. Ferrars also gets a shout-out. Although I have a print copy, I ended up listening to the audio download from the public library. The narrator is outstanding. The only thing missing from the audio version is the genealogical table at the front of the book. My only quibble with the story is that it changes Susan Vernon's character from one that readers love to hate to one that readers will root for. Highly recommended for fans of regency novels.read more
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I am obliged to admit that I was thoroughly entertained by Lady Vernon and Her Daughter. There are some who might say that to rework a novella of letters by such an esteemed author far too an ambitious undertaking. And yet there are some who are so bewitched with the Austenesque style that to have too long a period go by without some sort of Austen inspired release to be too cruel a fortune to bear. Lady Vernon and Her Daughter boasts wit and pleasant diversion, and gives Austen's admires something fresh to consume. And I'd daresay that this novel's gentlemen are as dashing and noble as any that Austen herself has conceived. Though at times the effort on the part of the authors is plainly obvious, and Lady Vernon is inhumanely charming and clever whilst her enemies are inconceivably daft, I still have the pleasure of saying Lady Vernon and Her Daughter is the most delightful Austen novel since Pride and Prejudice and Vampires. It would be to the credit of Austen fans to read it.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
I am honestly surprised how much I enjoyed this book. I usually stay off the spin-offs/continuations of classic books, but I think one of the things that made this book good was that it wasn't a spin-off/continuation of a major word. Lady Vernon and Her Daughter expands the story of Jane Austen's Lady Susan.In Lady Susan we see her as a selfish, conniving widow. In Lady Vernon and Her Daughter we see that might not be the case. It goes to show how gossip and biasness plays into people's opinions of others.The writing is incredibility crisp and the dialogue witty and refreshing. I just loved everything that came out of Sir James' mouth.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
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Reviews

A mother/daughter writing team have taken Jane Austen's epistolary novella, Lady Susan, filled in a back story, and turned it into a novel worthy of Jane Austen herself. It's not like some Austen-inspired fiction, where Austen's beloved characters speak and behave according to 21st century standards. I didn't notice any anachronisms in the story. The authors do engage in a bit of name-dropping. Sir Walter Elliot's family is mentioned a couple of times, including his middle daughter. Mrs. Ferrars also gets a shout-out. Although I have a print copy, I ended up listening to the audio download from the public library. The narrator is outstanding. The only thing missing from the audio version is the genealogical table at the front of the book. My only quibble with the story is that it changes Susan Vernon's character from one that readers love to hate to one that readers will root for. Highly recommended for fans of regency novels.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
I am obliged to admit that I was thoroughly entertained by Lady Vernon and Her Daughter. There are some who might say that to rework a novella of letters by such an esteemed author far too an ambitious undertaking. And yet there are some who are so bewitched with the Austenesque style that to have too long a period go by without some sort of Austen inspired release to be too cruel a fortune to bear. Lady Vernon and Her Daughter boasts wit and pleasant diversion, and gives Austen's admires something fresh to consume. And I'd daresay that this novel's gentlemen are as dashing and noble as any that Austen herself has conceived. Though at times the effort on the part of the authors is plainly obvious, and Lady Vernon is inhumanely charming and clever whilst her enemies are inconceivably daft, I still have the pleasure of saying Lady Vernon and Her Daughter is the most delightful Austen novel since Pride and Prejudice and Vampires. It would be to the credit of Austen fans to read it.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
I am honestly surprised how much I enjoyed this book. I usually stay off the spin-offs/continuations of classic books, but I think one of the things that made this book good was that it wasn't a spin-off/continuation of a major word. Lady Vernon and Her Daughter expands the story of Jane Austen's Lady Susan.In Lady Susan we see her as a selfish, conniving widow. In Lady Vernon and Her Daughter we see that might not be the case. It goes to show how gossip and biasness plays into people's opinions of others.The writing is incredibility crisp and the dialogue witty and refreshing. I just loved everything that came out of Sir James' mouth.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Lady Vernon and Her Daughter is an adaptation of an early Jane Austen work called Lady Susan (actually the work had no title when Austen wrote it - years later it was given the title of the main character). Written by a mother and daughter (one was a mystery writer and i hear that the other is a literary agent!) this is by far the best of the recent works that evolved from Jane Austen literature. In the original work Lady Susan Vernon is a beautiful and conniving recent widow with a 16-year-old daughter she keeps under her thumb while trying to force her to marry a wealthy man. In this book, the writers - Jane Rubino and Caiten Rubino-Bradway - flesh out Lady Vernon and her daughter and their motives that come off in a very authentic Austen fashion. Making a good match and having money to live on if you are an unmarried woman are at the center of all of Austen fiction and they pull the story closer to these themes. Lady Susan Vernon does not lose any of her cleverness for being more like a real Austen character than a character of some 18th century gothic novel - and it makes the finale more of a triumph when she wins out over the brother-in-law who inherits the family estate and cheats her out of her intended fortune. All of the characters appear or are talked about in the original except for the mother of Sir James Martin and the brother of Sir Reginald deCourcy (and a brief appearance of Lady Vernons parents) - but it is with Sir James that there is a real triumph - he is a witty and chivalrous delight - there is a touch of Henry Tilney about him but I think I like Sir James even better, and his banter with Lady Susan and with his mother had the true Austen spirit.
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I love Jane Austen novels, but am often disappointed with adaptations. Lady Vernon and Her Daughter was somewhat difficult to finish. Rubino never completely drew me into the characters' lives. It took me two months to finish the book. Work was very demanding at the time I was reading this book, so I was hoping for a welcome relief. Instead, I could only keep my eyes open for about 20 pages a night. Maybe I should have chosen a thriller or mystery. It was hundreds and hundreds of drawn-out storyline to come to an ending that was pretty much a given from the first third of the book. Austen's descriptions of clothing and events put me at an English ball, Rubino's descriptions put me to sleep.
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